Inside Cover: Silver Nanocrystals with Concave Surfaces and Their Optical and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Properties (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52/2011)

Authors

  • Xiaohu Xia,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (USA)
    2. Engineering Research Center of Molecular Diagnostics, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (P.R. China)
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Dr. Jie Zeng,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Brenden McDearmon,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yiqun Zheng,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Qingge Li,

    1. Engineering Research Center of Molecular Diagnostics, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (P.R. China)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Younan Xia

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (USA)
    • Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

original image

A seed-mediated growth method has been used to synthesize silver nanocrystals enclosed by concave surfaces and thus high-index facets in aqueous solution. Y. Xia and co-workers report in their Communication on page 12 542 ff. that controlling the growth habit of silver cubic seeds leads to concave silver nanocrystals that act as surface-enhanced Raman-scattering substrates with stronger signal enhancements than conventional silver nanocrystals of a similar size but enclosed by flat faces.

Ancillary