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A Molecular Cryptosystem for Images by DNA Computing

Authors

  • Sivan Shoshani,

    1. Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, Haifa 32000 (Israel)
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  • Dr. Ron Piran,

    1. Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, Haifa 32000 (Israel)
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  • Prof. Yoav Arava,

    1. Faculty of Biology, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)
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  • Prof. Ehud Keinan

    Corresponding author
    1. Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, Haifa 32000 (Israel)
    2. Department of Molecular Biology and the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (USA)
    • Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, Haifa 32000 (Israel)
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  • This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0523928 and the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute (RBNI). We also thank the Israel-US Binational Science Foundation and the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology. S.S. thanks the Irwin and Joan Jacobs Foundation, the Fine Foundation, the RBNI, and the Ministry of Science and Technology for graduate school fellowships. E.K. is incumbent of the Benno Gitter & Ilana Ben-Ami Chair of Biotechnology, Technion. We thank Dr. Miriam Kott-Gutkowski, Head of the MicroArray Service Laboratory in the Core Reasearch Facility at the Faculty of Medicine—Ein Karem, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Abstract

original image

Cracking the encryption: Parallel computing with molecular finite-state automata and fluorescently labeled DNA molecules has been used to decipher two different images encrypted onto a single DNA chip (see picture). The images were deciphered by a mixture of input molecules that were processed by biomolecular automata, a strategy that potentially offers a huge diversity of encrypted images.

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