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Inside Back Cover: An Autonomous and Controllable Light-Driven DNA Walking Device (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2012)

Authors

  • Mingxu You,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Physiology and Functional Genomics, Center for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface, Shands Cancer Center, UF Genetics Institute and McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7200 (USA)
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  • Dr. Yan Chen,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Physiology and Functional Genomics, Center for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface, Shands Cancer Center, UF Genetics Institute and McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7200 (USA)
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  • Prof. Dr. Xiaobing Zhang,

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Biology and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (P.R. China)
    • State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Biology and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (P.R. China)
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  • Dr. Haipeng Liu,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Physiology and Functional Genomics, Center for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface, Shands Cancer Center, UF Genetics Institute and McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7200 (USA)
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  • Dr. Ruowen Wang,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Physiology and Functional Genomics, Center for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface, Shands Cancer Center, UF Genetics Institute and McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7200 (USA)
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  • Dr. Kelong Wang,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Physiology and Functional Genomics, Center for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface, Shands Cancer Center, UF Genetics Institute and McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7200 (USA)
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  • Dr. Kathryn R. Williams,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Physiology and Functional Genomics, Center for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface, Shands Cancer Center, UF Genetics Institute and McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7200 (USA)
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  • Prof. Dr. Weihong Tan

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Physiology and Functional Genomics, Center for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface, Shands Cancer Center, UF Genetics Institute and McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7200 (USA)
    2. State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Biology and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (P.R. China)
    • Department of Chemistry and Physiology and Functional Genomics, Center for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface, Shands Cancer Center, UF Genetics Institute and McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7200 (USA)
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Abstract

original image

A nanorobot is able to perform autonomous locomotion and control the initiation, termination, and velocity by light. In their Communication on page 2457 ff., X. Zhang, W. Tan, and co-workers report the design of a DNA walking device by incorporating photosensitive moieties within DNA enzyme analogue structures. Based on the phenomenon of pyrene-assisted photolysis of disulfide bonds, this nanorobot shows the operational freedom and mechanical speed reminiscent of protein motors.

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