DNA Origami Gatekeepers for Solid-State Nanopores

Authors

  • Ruoshan Wei,

    1. Walter Schottky Institute, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching near Munich (Germany)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Thomas G. Martin,

    1. Center for Integrated Protein Science München & Institute for Advanced Study, Physics Department, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching near Munich (Germany)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Ulrich Rant,

    Corresponding author
    1. Walter Schottky Institute, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching near Munich (Germany)
    • Walter Schottky Institute, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching near Munich (Germany)
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  • Hendrik Dietz

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Integrated Protein Science München & Institute for Advanced Study, Physics Department, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching near Munich (Germany)
    • Center for Integrated Protein Science München & Institute for Advanced Study, Physics Department, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching near Munich (Germany)
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  • This work was supported by the German Excellence Initiative through grants from the Nano Initiative Munich and from the Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich, by the Collaborative Research Center SFB 863 of the German Research Society (DFG), the TUM Institute for Advanced Study, and a European Research Council Starting Grant to HD. R.W. was supported by the TUM Graduate School’s Faculty Graduate Center of Physics. Discussions with Friedrich Simmel, Michael Mayer, Daniel Branton, and George Church are gratefully acknowledged.

Abstract

original image

DNA has it covered: DNA origami gatekeeper nanoplates convert nanopores in solid-state membranes into versatile devices for label-free macromolecular sensing applications. The custom apertures in the nanoplates can be chemically addressed for sequence-specific detection of DNA.

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