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Self-Assembly of Thermally Responsive Nanoparticles of a Genetically Encoded Peptide Polymer by Drug Conjugation

Authors

  • Jonathan R. McDaniel,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 136 Hudson Hall, Box 90281, Durham, NC 27708-0281 (USA)
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    • These authors contributed equally.

  • Dr. Jayanta Bhattacharyya,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 136 Hudson Hall, Box 90281, Durham, NC 27708-0281 (USA)
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    • These authors contributed equally.

  • Kevin B. Vargo,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (USA)
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  • Wafa Hassouneh,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 136 Hudson Hall, Box 90281, Durham, NC 27708-0281 (USA)
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  • Prof. Daniel A. Hammer,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (USA)
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  • Prof. Ashutosh Chilkoti

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 136 Hudson Hall, Box 90281, Durham, NC 27708-0281 (USA)
    • Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 136 Hudson Hall, Box 90281, Durham, NC 27708-0281 (USA)
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  • This research was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (R01 EB000188) to A.C. and by the Research Triangle MRSEC of the NSF (DMR-1121107). J.R.M. acknowledges the financial support of a NIH Biotechnology Predoctoral Fellowship (T32 GM 8555).

Abstract

original image

Nanoparticles on demand: Upon the site-specific covalent attachment of hydrophobic molecules to one end of the biopolymer backbone, chimeric polypeptides (derived from elastin-like polypeptides) can self-assemble to form thermoresponsive nanoparticles suitable for drug delivery. Molecules with a distribution coefficient greater than 1.5 imparted sufficient amphiphilicity to drive self-assembly into sub-100 nm nanoparticles (see picture).

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