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Aptamer-Based Origami Paper Analytical Device for Electrochemical Detection of Adenosine

Authors

  • Hong Liu,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Electrochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-0165 (USA)
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  • Dr. Yu Xiang,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Prof. Yi Lu,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Prof. Richard M. Crooks

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Electrochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-0165 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Electrochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-0165 (USA)
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  • We thank Dr. Bingling Li for DNA characterization. R.M.C. acknowledges sponsorship of this project by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Contract No. HR0011-12-2-0003) and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (Contract No. HDTRA1-11-1-0005). The content of the information does not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the US Government. No official endorsement should be inferred. Y.L. acknowledges support from the National Institutes of Health (ES16865). We also thank Dr. Antonio J. Ricco for providing several important technical suggestions.

Abstract

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Paper biosensors: An origami sensor is printed on a single piece of paper, folded into a three-dimensional fluidic device, and encapsulated by thermal lamination. Aptamer is trapped in the fluidic channel, where it binds to the target and releases an enzyme to generate a signal. The device is read out using a digital multimeter.

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