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A Magnetic Gram Stain for Bacterial Detection

Authors

  • Dr. Ghyslain Budin,

    1. Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114 (USA)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Dr. Hyun Jung Chung,

    1. Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114 (USA)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Prof. Hakho Lee,

    1. Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114 (USA)
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  • Prof. Ralph Weissleder

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114 (USA)
    2. Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (USA)
    • Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114 (USA)
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  • This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant number 2P50CA086355. We thank Yoshi Iwamoto and Alex Zaltsman for image processing.

Abstract

original image

Magnetizing: Bacteria are often classified into Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains by staining with crystal violet (CV). The described bioorthogonal modification of CV with trans-cyclooctene (TCO) can be used to render Gram-positive bacteria magnetic with tetrazine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNP-Tz). This method allows class-specific automated magnetic detection and magnetic separation.

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