A Supramolecular Complex in Small-Molecule Solar Cells based on Contorted Aromatic Molecules

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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Corrigendum: A Supramolecular Complex in Small-Molecule Solar Cells based on Contorted Aromatic Molecules Volume 52, Issue 28, 7063, Article first published online: 4 July 2013

  • This research was supported as part of the Center for Re-Defining Photovoltaic Efficiency Through Molecular-Scale Control, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under award number DE-SC0001085) and the FENA (Grant 2009-NT-2048). J.B.K., S.S.L., and Y.L.L. also acknowledge funding by the Photovoltaics Program at ONR (N00014-11-10328) and an NSF-sponsored MRSEC through the Princeton Center for Complex Materials (DMR-0819860). Portions of this research were carried out at beamline 11-3 at SSRL, a national user facility operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and at the Center for Functional Nano-materials, and beamline X-9 at BNL, which are supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886. We thank Chad Miller for assistance with data collection.

Abstract

original image

“Ball and socket” motif: The contorted dibenzotetrathienocoronene (6-DBTTC) forms a complex with the C70 fullerene PC70BM embedded in an amorphous phase of PC70BM. The materials are processable into organic solar cells in solution. The power conversion efficiency is maximal when there is a 1:2 molar ratio of 6-DBTTC to PC70BM. Formation of the supramolecular complex directly affects charge separation in the active layer.

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