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Surface-Immobilized Single-Site Iridium Complexes for Electrocatalytic Water Splitting

Authors

  • Dr. Khurram Saleem Joya,

    Corresponding author
    1. Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA, Leiden (The Netherlands)
    2. Department of Chemistry, University of Engineering and Technology (UET), GT Road, 54890, Lahore, Punjab (Pakistan)
    • Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA, Leiden (The Netherlands)
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  • Dr. Navaneetha K. Subbaiyan,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, #305070, Denton, TX 76203 (USA)
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  • Prof. Francis D'Souza,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, #305070, Denton, TX 76203 (USA)
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  • Prof. Huub J. M. de Groot

    Corresponding author
    1. Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA, Leiden (The Netherlands)
    • Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA, Leiden (The Netherlands)
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  • K.S.J. acknowledges the Higher Education Commission (HEC), Pakistan, for the research grant. We also thank Dr. Yasir Faheem for help in electrode surface preparation. This work is also partially supported by National Science Foundation (Grant No. 1110942 to F.D.) and by the BioSolar Cells open innovation program of the Netherlands Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation.

Abstract

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Water into oxygen: Mono-iridium complexes (see picture; L=PO3H2 or COOH) were immobilized on an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface to form a molecular electrocatalytic water oxidation assembly that mimics photosystem II in producing molecular oxygen with high turnover numbers (TONs). The catalyst shows TONs for O2 higher than 210 000 and turnover frequencies higher than 6.7 s−1 during electrochemical catalytic water splitting.

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