Get access

Mechanical Drawing of Gas Sensors on Paper

Authors

  • Dr. Katherine A. Mirica,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jonathan G. Weis,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Jan M. Schnorr,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Birgit Esser,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Dr. Timothy M. Swager

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This work was supported by the Army Research Office through the Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (W911NF-07-D-004), the National Institute of Health and the National Cancer Institute (postdoctoral fellowship to K.A.M.; grant number F32A1571997), and the German Academy of Sciences (postdoctoral fellowship to B.E.; LPDS 2009-8).

Abstract

original image

Pencil it in: Mechanical abrasion of compressed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on the surface of paper produces sensors capable of detecting NH3 gas at sub-ppm concentrations. This method of fabrication is simple, inexpensive, and entirely solvent-free, and avoids difficulties arising from the inherent instability of many SWCNT dispersions.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary