Back Cover: Two Interconvertible Structures that Explain the Spectroscopic Properties of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II in the S2 State (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 39/2012)

Authors

  • Dr. Dimitrios A. Pantazis,

    Corresponding author
    1. Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Stiftstrasse 34–36, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)
    • Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Stiftstrasse 34–36, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)
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  • Dr. William Ames,

    1. Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Stiftstrasse 34–36, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)
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  • Dr. Nicholas Cox,

    1. Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Stiftstrasse 34–36, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)
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  • Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Lubitz,

    1. Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Stiftstrasse 34–36, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)
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  • Prof. Dr. Frank Neese

    Corresponding author
    1. Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Stiftstrasse 34–36, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)
    • Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Stiftstrasse 34–36, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)
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Abstract

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The structural flexibility of water oxidase is demonstrated by a combination of quantum chemistry and spectroscopy. In their Communication on page 9935 ff., D. A. Pantazis, F. Neese et al. show that the core of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex exists in two interconvertible structures with distinct spectroscopic properties. This solves the puzzle of the two interconvertible signals in the S2 oxidation state of the catalyst, and paves the way for a deeper understanding of its function.

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