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Physicochemical Properties of Protein-Coated Gold Nanoparticles in Biological Fluids and Cells before and after Proteolytic Digestion

Authors

  • Dr. Munish Chanana,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departamento de Química Física, Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain)
    • Departamento de Química Física, Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain)
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  • Dr. Pilar Rivera_Gil,

    1. Fachbereich Physik und Wissenschaftliches Zentrum für Material- wissenschaften (WZMW), Philipps-Universität Marburg, Renthof 7, 35037 Marburg (Germany)
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  • Prof. Dr. Miguel A. Correa-Duarte,

    1. Departamento de Química Física, Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain)
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  • Prof. Dr. Luis M. Liz-Marzán,

    1. Departamento de Química Física, Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain)
    2. CIC biomaGUNE, Paseo de Miramón 182, 20009 Donostia–San Sebastián (Spain)
    3. Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)
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  • Prof. Dr. Wolfgang J. Parak

    Corresponding author
    1. Fachbereich Physik und Wissenschaftliches Zentrum für Material- wissenschaften (WZMW), Philipps-Universität Marburg, Renthof 7, 35037 Marburg (Germany)
    • Fachbereich Physik und Wissenschaftliches Zentrum für Material- wissenschaften (WZMW), Philipps-Universität Marburg, Renthof 7, 35037 Marburg (Germany)
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  • This research was supported by the EU (METACHEM, grant number CP-FP 228762-2), the Spanish Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (MAT2010-15374), Fundación Ramón Areces and the DFG (PA794/11-1 to W.J.P.).

Abstract

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What's going on in there?! Little is known about the fate of nanoparticles (NPs) after their internalization by cells and organisms. Protein-coated gold NPs were used to study the physicochemical properties of NPs in extra- and intracellular fluids. These potential vehicles for enzymatic drug delivery were highly stable at pH 7.4 in the presence of salts and free proteins, but agglomerated reversibly under acidic conditions (see picture).

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