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One Molecule, Two Atoms, Three Views, Four Bonds?

Authors

  • Prof. Dr. Sason Shaik,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Chemistry and The Lise Meitner-Minerva Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904, Jerusalem (Israel)
    • Institute of Chemistry and The Lise Meitner-Minerva Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904, Jerusalem (Israel)
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  • Prof. Dr. Henry S. Rzepa,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ (UK)
    • Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ (UK)
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  • Prof. Dr. Roald Hoffmann

    Corresponding author
    1. Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301 (USA)
    • Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301 (USA)
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  • We are grateful to Don Truhlar, Eugen Schwarz, Phil Shevlin, Philippe Hiberty, David Danovich, and Dasari Prasad for their comments, and to Catherine Kempf for help in preparing this manuscript.

Abstract

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What could be simpler than C2, a diatomic molecule that has the second strongest homonuclear bond? This molecule turns out to be a microcosm of the bonding issues that bother chemists, as is shown in this trialogue. Join the three authors in their lively debate, light a candle, as Faraday did, and see the excited states of C2!

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