Get access

A Plasmonic DNAzyme Strategy for Point-of-Care Genetic Detection of Infectious Pathogens

Authors

  • Kyryl Zagorovsky,

    1. Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 160 College Street, Room 450, Toronto, ON, M5S3E1 (Canada)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Warren C. W. Chan

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 160 College Street, Room 450, Toronto, ON, M5S3E1 (Canada)
    • Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 160 College Street, Room 450, Toronto, ON, M5S3E1 (Canada)

    Search for more papers by this author

  • The authors acknowledge the Canadian Institute of Health Research (MOP93532) and Natural Science and Engineering Research Council (CRDPG411601) for funding through the CHRP program (CPG-112321), Canadian Foundation for Innovation, and Ministry of Research and Innovation. The authors thank Mr. Leo Chou for pertinent discussions, and Dr. Anu Rebbapragada and Mr. Stephen Perusini for designing the targets for N. gonorrhoeae detection.

Abstract

original image

Always use detection: Signal amplification from DNAzymes (see scheme) was combined with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to give a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay for various genetic targets. The assay has 50 pM sensitivity without the need for purification steps and can detect multiple targets in parallel. This was applied to rapidly detect gonorrhea, syphilis, malaria, and hepatitis B infections.

Ancillary