Future of the Particle Replication in Nonwetting Templates (PRINT) Technology

Authors

  • Dr. Jing Xu,

    1. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (USA)
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  • Dominica H. C. Wong,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (USA)
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  • James D. Byrne,

    1. Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (USA)
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  • Kai Chen,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (USA)
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  • Dr. Charles Bowerman,

    1. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (USA)
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  • Prof. Joseph M. DeSimone

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (USA)
    2. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (USA)
    3. Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (USA)
    4. Department of Pharmacology, Carolina Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Institute for Advanced Materials, Institute for Nanomedicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (USA)
    5. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (USA)
    6. Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (USA)
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Abstract

Particle replication in nonwetting templates (PRINT) is a continuous, roll-to-roll, high-resolution molding technology which allows the design and synthesis of precisely defined micro- and nanoparticles. This technology adapts the lithographic techniques from the microelectronics industry and marries these with the roll-to-roll processes from the photographic film industry to enable researchers to have unprecedented control over particle size, shape, chemical composition, cargo, modulus, and surface properties. In addition, PRINT is a GMP-compliant (GMP=good manufacturing practice) platform amenable for particle fabrication on a large scale. Herein, we describe some of our most recent work involving the PRINT technology for application in the biomedical and material sciences.

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