Monovalent Streptavidin that Senses Oligonucleotides

Authors

  • Dr. Steven K. Taylor,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Columbia University, 630 W. 168th St., Box 84, New York, NY 10032 (USA)
    • Department of Medicine, Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Columbia University, 630 W. 168th St., Box 84, New York, NY 10032 (USA)

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jingxian Wang,

    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Columbia University, 630 W. 168th St., Box 84, New York, NY 10032 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Natasa Kostic,

    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Columbia University, 630 W. 168th St., Box 84, New York, NY 10032 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Dr. Milan N. Stojanovic

    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Columbia University, 630 W. 168th St., Box 84, New York, NY 10032 (USA)
    2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This work was supported by NSF (CBET-1033288 and 1026592) and NIH (RGM-104960). We thank Dr. Francine Katz for expert advice, and Prof. Henry Hess for advice in writing this paper.

Abstract

original image

Only one place available: Monovalent streptavidin is prepared in a one-step process based on a trisbiotinylated oligonucleotide that blocks three of streptavidin's four biotin-binding sites. The complex is highly sensitive to single-base differences: perfectly matched oligonucleotides trigger dissociation of the biotin–streptavidin interaction at higher rates than strands with single-base mismatches.

Ancillary