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Water-Splitting Catalysis and Solar Fuel Devices: Artificial Leaves on the Move

Authors

  • Dr. Khurram Saleem Joya,

    Corresponding author
    1. Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (The Netherlands)
    2. Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Stiftstrasse 34–36, 45470/Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)
    3. Department of Chemistry, University of Engineering and Technology, GT Road, Lahore, Punjab 54890 (Pakistan)
    • Khurram Saleem Joya, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (The Netherlands)

      Roel van de Krol, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

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  • Dr. Yasir F. Joya,

    1. Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23640, Khyber Pakhtunkhaw (Pakistan)
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  • Prof. Kasim Ocakoglu,

    1. Advanced Technology Research & Application Center, Mersin University, Yenisehir, Mersin (Turkey)
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  • Prof. Roel van de Krol

    Corresponding author
    1. Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 14109 Berlin (Germany)
    • Khurram Saleem Joya, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (The Netherlands)

      Roel van de Krol, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

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Abstract

The development of new energy materials that can be utilized to make renewable and clean fuels from abundant and easily accessible resources is among the most challenging and demanding tasks in science today. Solar-powered catalytic water-splitting processes can be exploited as a source of electrons and protons to make clean renewable fuels, such as hydrogen, and in the sequestration of CO2 and its conversion into low-carbon energy carriers. Recently, there have been tremendous efforts to build up a stand-alone solar-to-fuel conversion device, the “artificial leaf”, using light and water as raw materials. An overview of the recent progress in electrochemical and photo-electrocatalytic water splitting devices is presented, using both molecular water oxidation complexes (WOCs) and nano-structured assemblies to develop an artificial photosynthetic system.

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