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Plasmonic and Catalytic AuPd Nanowheels for the Efficient Conversion of Light into Chemical Energy

Authors

  • Xiaoqing Huang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA)
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  • Yongjia Li,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA)
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  • Yu Chen,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA)
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  • Hailong Zhou,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA)
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  • Prof. Xiangfeng Duan,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA)
    2. California Nanosystems Institute, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA)
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  • Prof. Yu Huang

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA)
    2. California Nanosystems Institute, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA)

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  • We acknowledge the support from ARO, Award 54709-MS-PCS and ONR Award N00014-08-1-0985. We thank EICN at CNSI for the TEM support. Y.H. acknowledges the support of a Sloan Research Fellowship.

Abstract

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Reinventing the wheel: Bimetallic AuPd nanowheels (see picture), a freestanding form of 2D AuPd nanostructures, were synthesized in a one-pot process. The well-defined and tunable surface plasmon resonance displayed by these nanowheels was exploited in a unique catalytic process in which light energy was used to drive catalytic reactions, such as the Suzuki coupling, with much higher efficiency than that of the conventional heating process.

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