Cover Picture: Protection and Deprotection of DNA—High-Temperature Stability of Nucleic Acid Barcodes for Polymer Labeling (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 15/2013)

Authors

  • M. Sc. Daniela Paunescu,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)
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  • Dr. Roland Fuhrer,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)
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  • Dr. Robert N. Grass

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)
    • Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)
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Abstract

original image

When DNA is encapsulated in a silica sphere, the encoded information can be protected for storage and distribution, much in the way a bottle protects the message inside from the rough sea. As R. N. Grass et al. describe in their Communication on page 4269 ff., a silica layer only 10 nm thick is sufficient to protect DNA from high temperatures and aggressive radical conditions. The glass can be broken by reaction with HF and the information recovered for biochemical analysis.

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