The Winding Pathway to Erythropoietin Along the Chemistry–Biology Frontier: A Success At Last

Authors

  • Rebecca M. Wilson,

    1. Laboratory for Bioorganic Chemistry, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA)
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  • Dr. Suwei Dong,

    1. Laboratory for Bioorganic Chemistry, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA)
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  • Dr. Ping Wang,

    1. Laboratory for Bioorganic Chemistry, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA)
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  • Prof. Samuel J. Danishefsky

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory for Bioorganic Chemistry, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA)
    2. Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, Havemeyer Hall, 3000 Broadway, New York, NY 10027 (USA)
    • Laboratory for Bioorganic Chemistry, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA)
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  • Dedicated to Stephen Kent and his associates for their discovery of native chemical ligation.

Abstract

The total synthesis of a homogeneous erythropoietin (EPO), possessing the native amino acid sequence and chitobiose glycans at each of the three wild-type sites of N glycosylation, has been accomplished in our laboratory. We provide herein an account of our decade-long research effort en route to this formidable target compound. The optimization of the synergy of the two bedrock sciences we now call biology and chemistry was central to the success of the synthesis of EPO.

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