Dynamics of a Nanometer-Sized Uranyl Cluster in Solution

Authors

  • Rene L. Johnson,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616 (USA)
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  • Dr. C. André Ohlin,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)
    • School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)
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  • Kristi Pellegrini,

    1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame (USA)
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  • Prof. Peter C. Burns,

    1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame (USA)
    2. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame (USA)
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  • Prof. William H. Casey

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616 (USA)
    2. Department of Geology, University of California, Davis (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616 (USA)
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  • This work is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science of the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Materials Science of Actinides Energy Frontier Research Center (DE-SC0001089). Additional funding sources are listed in the Supporting Information.

Abstract

original image

A class of uranyl peroxide clusters was discovered before as nanometer-sized ions that form spontaneously in aqueous solutions. The uranyl(VI) cluster investigated here is approximately 2 nm in diameter, contains 24 uranyl moieties, and 12 pyrophosphate units. NMR spectroscopy shows that the ion has two distinct forms that interconvert in milliseconds to seconds depending on the temperature and the size of the counterions. P blue, O red, U yellow.

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