Back Cover: Chemotactic Behavior of Catalytic Motors in Microfluidic Channels (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 21/2013)

Authors

  • Dr. Larysa Baraban,

    1. Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)
    2. Current address: Dresden University of Technology, Budapesterstrasse 27, 01069 Dresden (Germany)
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  • Dr. Stefan M. Harazim,

    1. Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)
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  • Dr. Samuel Sanchez,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)
    • Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

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  • Prof. Dr. Oliver G. Schmidt

    1. Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)
    2. Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Strasse 70, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)
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Abstract

original image

When man-made self-powered micromotors swim in a gradient of chemical fuel, they experience a chemical attraction towards the fuel and deviate from their otherwise random motion. As S. Sanchez et al. describe in their Communication on page 5552 ff., self-propelled microjets and microparticles change their trajectory when hydrogen peroxide fuel is added to the solution in which they navigate, a response similar to the chemotactic behavior of some living organisms. (The authors thank Dr. Träger for designing the image.)

Cartoon 1.

Ancillary