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Electron-Beam-Induced Deposition of Bimetallic Nanostructures from Bulk Liquids

Authors

  • Dr. Matthew Bresin,

    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky, 453 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY (USA)
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  • Adam Chamberlain,

    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky, 453 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY (USA)
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  • Dr. Eugenii U. Donev,

    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky, 453 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY (USA)
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  • Dr. Chandan B. Samantaray,

    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky, 453 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY (USA)
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  • Gregory S. Schardien,

    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky, 453 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY (USA)
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  • Prof. Dr. J. Todd Hastings

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky, 453 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY (USA)
    • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky, 453 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY (USA)
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  • This material is partially based upon work supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) under award number N66001-09-1-2099. This material is also based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant number CMMI-1125998. The authors thank C. May, B. Wajdyk, and the University of Kentucky Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering as well as J. Ye, L. Rice, and the University of Kentucky Electron Microscopy Center for valuable technical support.

Abstract

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Bimetallic deposits: Liquid-phase electron-beam-induced deposition is shown to result in bimetallic deposits with predictable final compositions. The compositions were predicted by the first-order rates of the reaction between solvated electrons and metal ionic complexes. AuAg and AuPt nanoparticles are shown with diameters typically less than 100 nm and high purity.

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