Cover Picture: Evidence for Low-Temperature Melting of Mercury owing to Relativity (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 29/2013)

Authors

  • Dr. Florent Calvo,

    Corresponding author
    1. ILM, Université de Lyon and CNRS UMR 5306, 43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)
    • ILM, Université de Lyon and CNRS UMR 5306, 43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)
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  • Dr. Elke Pahl,

    1. Center of Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Auckland, Private Bag 102904, North Shore City, 0745 Auckland (New Zealand)
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  • Dr. Michael Wormit,

    1. Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)
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  • Prof. Dr. Peter Schwerdtfeger

    Corresponding author
    1. Center of Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Auckland, Private Bag 102904, North Shore City, 0745 Auckland (New Zealand)
    2. Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, 35032 Marburg (Germany)
    • Center of Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Auckland, Private Bag 102904, North Shore City, 0745 Auckland (New Zealand)
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Abstract

original image

The generalized theory of relativity gives a correct explanation of the residual motion of the perihelion of planet mercury. As F. Calvo, P. Schwerdtfeger, et al. show in their Communication on page 7583 ff., the special theory of relativity has furnished an even more remarkable result. It gives the correct explanation as to why mercury is the only liquid metal at room temperature, as demonstrated by parallel-tempering Monte Carlo simulations (Picture: Cameron Smorenburg).

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