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Cucurbit[7]uril Containers for Targeted Delivery of Oxaliplatin to Cancer Cells

Authors

  • Dr. Liping Cao,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Gaya Hettiarachchi,

    1. Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Prof. Dr. Volker Briken,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    • Volker Briken, Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)

      Lyle Isaacs, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)

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  • Prof. Dr. Lyle Isaacs

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    • Volker Briken, Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)

      Lyle Isaacs, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)

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  • L.I. thanks the National Science Foundation (CHE-1110911) and V.B. thanks the National Cancer Institute of the NIH (R01 CA168365) for financial support. G.H. thanks the University of Maryland for a Wylie Fellowship.

Abstract

original image

Stay on target: The cucurbit[7]uril derivative 1, which bears a covalently attached biotin targeting ligand allows for the efficient delivery of oxaliplatin as its 1⋅oxaliplatin complex to cancer cells resulting in enhanced cytotoxicity relative to oxaliplatin alone.

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