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[BH3C(NO2)3]: The First Room-Temperature Stable (Trinitromethyl)borate

Authors

  • Guillaume Bélanger-Chabot,

    1. Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661 (USA)
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  • Dr. Martin Rahm,

    1. Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661 (USA)
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  • Prof. Ralf Haiges,

    1. Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661 (USA)
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  • Prof. Karl O. Christe

    Corresponding author
    1. Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661 (USA)
    • Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661 (USA)

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  • This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The X-ray diffractometer was supported by NSF CRIF grant 1048807. Guillaume Bélanger-Chabot acknowledges support from the Fonds de recherche du Québec-Nature et technologies (FQRNT) and from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

Abstract

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The marriage of fire and water: The strongly oxidizing trinitromethyl and strongly reducing BH3 groups were successfully combined for the first time in the novel [BH3C(NO2)3] ion. The stability at room temperature of the new (trinitromethyl)borate is in sharp contrast to the behavior of [BCl3C(NO2)3], which already decomposes at −20 °C.

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