Oxygen Electrochemistry as a Cornerstone for Sustainable Energy Conversion

Authors

  • Dr. Ioannis Katsounaros,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany) www.mpie.de/ecat
    • Department of Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany) www.mpie.de/ecat

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  • Dr. Serhiy Cherevko,

    1. Department of Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany) www.mpie.de/ecat
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  • Dr. Aleksandar R. Zeradjanin,

    1. Department of Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany) www.mpie.de/ecat
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  • Dr. Karl J. J. Mayrhofer

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany) www.mpie.de/ecat
    • Department of Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany) www.mpie.de/ecat

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Abstract

Electrochemistry will play a vital role in creating sustainable energy solutions in the future, particularly for the conversion and storage of electrical into chemical energy in electrolysis cells, and the reverse conversion and utilization of the stored energy in galvanic cells. The common challenge in both processes is the development of—preferably abundant—nanostructured materials that can catalyze the electrochemical reactions of interest with a high rate over a sufficiently long period of time. An overall understanding of the related processes and mechanisms occurring under the operation conditions is a necessity for the rational design of materials that meet these requirements. A promising strategy to develop such an understanding is the investigation of the impact of material properties on reaction activity/selectivity and on catalyst stability under the conditions of operation, as well as the application of complementary in situ techniques for the investigation of catalyst structure and composition.

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