Photoredox Transformations with Dimeric Gold Complexes

Authors

  • Dr. Guillaume Revol,

    1. Centre For Catalysis, Research and Innovation, Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, On, K1N 6N5 (Canada)
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  • Terry McCallum,

    1. Centre For Catalysis, Research and Innovation, Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, On, K1N 6N5 (Canada)
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  • Mathieu Morin,

    1. Centre For Catalysis, Research and Innovation, Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, On, K1N 6N5 (Canada)
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  • Dr. Fabien Gagosz,

    1. Département de Chimie, UMR 7652, CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)
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  • Prof. Louis Barriault

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre For Catalysis, Research and Innovation, Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, On, K1N 6N5 (Canada)
    • Centre For Catalysis, Research and Innovation, Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, On, K1N 6N5 (Canada)===

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  • We thank the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (for Accelerator and Discovery grants to L.B.) and the University of Ottawa (for a University Research Chair to L.B.) for support of this research. We also thank Prof. Derek Pratt (University of Ottawa) for insightful discussions.

Abstract

original image

Let the sunshine in! Unactivated alkyl and aryl bromides underwent a light-enabled reductive radical cyclization in the presence of a dimeric phosphine–gold complex as a photocatalyst (see scheme; X=C(CO2Et)2, NR, O). Sunlight can be used as the energy source for this simple and efficient radical reaction, which does not require potentially hazardous and toxic chemical reagents, such as organostannanes and chemical initiators.

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