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Molecular Characterization of DNA Double Strand Breaks with Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering

Authors

  • Ewelina Lipiec,

    1. The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)
    2. Centre for Biospectroscopy, School of Chemistry, Monash University, 3800, Victoria (Australia)
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  • Dr. Ryo Sekine,

    1. Centre for Biospectroscopy, School of Chemistry, Monash University, 3800, Victoria (Australia)
    2. Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, 5095 SA Adelaide (Australia)
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  • Dr. Jakub Bielecki,

    1. The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)
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  • Prof. Dr. Wojciech M. Kwiatek,

    1. The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)
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  • Assoc. Prof. Bayden R. Wood

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Biospectroscopy, School of Chemistry, Monash University, 3800, Victoria (Australia)
    • Centre for Biospectroscopy, School of Chemistry, Monash University, 3800, Victoria (Australia)

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  • This work was financially supported by an Australian Research Council future fellowship (grant number DP110104821). We would also like to acknowledge Prof. Małgorzata Lekka for advice on the preparation of the manuscript and Mr Finlay Shanks for instrumental support.

Abstract

DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are deadly lesions that can lead to genetic defects and cell apoptosis. Techniques that directly detect DNA DSBs include scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and fluorescence based approaches. While these techniques can be used to identify DSBs they provide no information on the molecular events occurring at the break. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) can provide molecular information from DNA at the nanoscale and in combination with AFM provides a new way to visualize and characterize the molecular structure of DSBs. DSBs result from cleavage at the 3’- and 5’-bonds of deoxyribose upon exposure to UVC radiation based on the observation of P[BOND]O[BOND]H and methyl/methylene deformation modes enhanced in the TERS spectra. It is hypothesized that strand fragments are hydrogen-terminated at the lesion, indicating the action of free radicals during photon exposure.

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