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New Members of the Editorial Board and International Advisory Board Editorial Board

The Editorial Board advises the editorial team on all important issues and are selected by the Board of the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh; German Chemical Society) upon recommendation by the Editorial Board and the editorial team. After 19 years on the Editorial Board (and 10 years as its Chairman) François Diederich will now join the International Advisory Board (see below). Hartmut Michel, Walter Thiel, and Otto Wolfbeis have completed two terms and will now leave the Editorial Board, and we thank them all for their commitment to the journal. Matthias Beller, Stefan Buchholz, Claus Feldmann, Martin Suhm, and Herbert Waldmann have all been elected to another term. Alois Fürstner (Max Planck Institute for Coal Research, Mülheim) is the new Chairman of the Editorial Board, having been a member since 2011, when he was introduced in this section.1a In his Editorial published in this issue, Fürstner discusses the importance of organic synthesis, among other topics.1b

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Annette G. Beck-Sickinger (University of Leipzig) studied at the University of Tübingen, where she worked with Günther Jung for her PhD (awarded in 1989). After postdoctoral work with Ernesto Carafoli at the ETH Zurich (1990–1991) and completing her habilitation at the University of Tübingen (1995), she joined the faculty of the ETH Zurich in 1997. She was made Professor of Biochemistry and Bioorganic Chemistry at the University of Leipzig in 1999. Beck-Sickinger’s research interests include ligand–receptor interactions, signal transduction, and protein expression and modification.2 She is also on the International Advisory Board of ChemMedChem.

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Thomas Carell (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU), Munich) studied at the Universities of Münster and Heidelberg, and worked with Heinz A. Staab at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, for his PhD (awarded in 1993). From 1993–1995, he carried out postdoctoral research with Julius Rebek, Jr. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and he subsequently moved to the ETH Zurich, where he carried out independent research in the group of François Diederich and completed his habilitation in 1999. He was appointed Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Marburg in 2000, and moved to the LMU in 2004. Carell’s research interests include DNA hybrid materials, DNA damage and repair, tRNA modifications, and click chemistry on biomolecules.3 Carell is also Co-Chair of the Editorial Advisory Board of ChemBioChem and is on the International Advisory Board of the Israel Journal of Chemistry.

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Stefan Grimme (University of Bonn) studied at the Technische Universität Braunschweig, where he was awarded his PhD in 1991 for work supervised by Herbert Dreeskamp. He completed his habilitation 1997 in the group of Sigrid Peyerimoff at the University of Bonn, and in 2000, he was made Chair of Theoretical Organic Chemistry at the University of Münster. He moved to the Chair of Theoretical Chemistry at the University of Bonn in 2011. Grimme’s research involves quantum-chemical methods, density functional theory and electronic structure, and theoretical electronic spectroscopy and thermochemistry.4 Grimme is also on the Editorial Advisory Board of ChemistryOpen.

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Hansjörg Grützmacher (ETH Zurich) studied at the University of Göttingen, where he completed his PhD (supervised by Herbert W. Roesky) in 1986. From 1986–1987, he was a chargé de recherche with Guy Bertrand at the CNRS Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination, and from 1987–1992 he carried out his habilitation and was lecturer at the University of Heidelberg. In 1992, he was made Professor of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry at the University of Freiburg, and in 1995, he moved to the ETH Zurich, where he is Professor of Inorganic Chemistry. Grützmacher’s research interests involve main-group chemistry and organometallic chemistry.5

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Wolfgang J. Parak (University of Marburg) studied at the Technische Universität München and carried out his PhD with Hermann Gaub at the LMU. He carried out postdoctoral research with Paul Alivisatos at the University of California (UC), Berkeley, and was subsequently a junior research group leader at the LMU (2003–2006). He was appointed Professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Marburg in 2007, and was also made Head of the Biofunctional Nanomaterials Unit at CIC biomaGUNE in San Sebastian in 2013. Parak’s research interests are in the synthesis, characterization, and biological and bioanalytical applications of nanoparticles.6 Parak is also on the Editorial Advisory Board of Particle & Particle Systems Characterization.

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Ferdi Schüth (Max Planck Institute for Coal Research) studied chemistry and law at the University of Münster and received his PhD (supervised by Ewald Wicke) in 1988. After postdoctoral work with Lanny D. Schmidt at the University of Minnesota (1989), he completed his habilitation in the group of Klaus Unger at the University of Mainz (1989–1995). From 1995–1998, he was professor at the University of Frankfurt, and in 1998, he was made director at the Max Planck Institute for Coal Research. Schüth’s research in focused on inorganic materials for heterogeneous catalysis.7 Schüth is also on the Advisory Boards of Advanced Materials, ChemCatChem, and ChemSusChem.

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International Advisory Board

The members of the International Advisory Board support the work of the editorial team and the Editorial Board and act as “ambassadors” for the journal. We welcome 16 new members to the International Advisory Board, and thank Lia Addadi, Chunli Bai, Scott Biller, Alan R. Fersht, Andrew B. Holmes, Shengming Ma, Bernard Meunier, Chad A. Mirkin, K. C. Nicolaou, Luis Oro, and J. Fraser Stoddart, whose terms on the board finished in 2013.

Phil S. Baran (The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla) studied at New York University, and carried out his PhD (awarded in 2001) with K. C. Nicolaou at The Scripps Research Institute. After postdoctoral research with Elias J. Corey at Harvard University (2001–2003), he joined the faculty at The Scripps Research Institute, where he is currently Darlene Shiley Chair in Chemistry. Baran’s research is focused on the total synthesis of natural products.8

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Hagan Bayley (University of Oxford) studied at the University of Oxford, and worked with Jeremy R. Knowles at Harvard University for his PhD, which was awarded in 1979. From 1979–1981, he was a postdoctoral researcher with Har Gobind Khorana at MIT, and from 1981–1984, he was on the faculty at Columbia University. After a year as lecturer at the University of Oxford, he rejoined Columbia University, before moving to the Worcester Foundation (1988–1996) with posts at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center and Clark University. In 1997, he joined Texas A&M University, and in 2003, he was made Professor of Chemical Biology at the University of Oxford. Bayley’s research interests include the study of covalent chemistry at the single-molecule level, ultrarapid DNA sequencing, and the synthetic biology of minimal tissues.9 Bayley is also on the Editorial Advisory Board of ChemBioChem.

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Frank Caruso (The University of Melbourne) studied at the University of Melbourne, where he received his PhD in 1993 for work supervised by Franz Grieser and Peter Thistlethwaite. From 1994–1996, he was a postdoctoral fellow with D. Neil Furlong at the CSIRO Division of Chemicals and Polymers, and from 1997–1998, he was an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow with Helmuth Möhwald at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam, where he remained until 2002 as group leader and research scientist. He subsequently returned to The University of Melbourne, where he is currently professor and ARC Australian Laureate Fellow. Caruso’s research interests include polymers at interfaces, colloidal systems, biomaterials, and nanocomposite thin films.10 He is also on the Editorial Advisory Boards of Advanced Functional Materials and Advanced Healthcare Materials.

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Avelino Corma (Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, UPV) studied at the Universitat de València and received his PhD (supervised by Antonio Cortés) from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 1976. After postdoctoral work with Bohdan Wojciechowski at Queen’s University, Kingston, he joined the CSIC, and in 1990, he moved to the UPV, where he founded the Instituto de Tecnología Química. Corma’s research is focused in heterogeneous catalysis, including solids with well-defined active sites.11 Corma is also on the Editorial or Advisory Boards of ChemCatChem, ChemPlusChem, ChemPhysChem, ChemSusChem, and The Chemical Record.

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Joseph M. DeSimone (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; UNC) studied at Ursinus College and worked under the supervision of James E. McGrath at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for his PhD (awarded in 1990). He subsequently joined the faculties at the UNC (1990) and North Carolina State University (NCSU), and is currently Director of the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry at UNC, and William R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at NCSU and of Chemistry at UNC. DeSimone is interested in topics such as using lithographic fabrication technology for the synthesis of medicines and vaccines.12 DeSimone is also on the Editorial Advisory Board of Small.

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François Diederich (ETH Zurich) was on the Editorial Board from 1994–2013, and was its Chairman for the last ten years. His Review on “125 Years of Chemistry in the Mirror of ‘Angewandte’” was published in Issue 10/2013.13 Diederich studied at the University of Heidelberg, where he carried out his PhD (awarded in 1979) with Heinz A. Staab. From 1979–1981, he was a postdoctoral researcher with Orville L. Chapman at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and from 1981–1985, he carried out his habilitation at the Max Planck Institute for Medicinal Research in Heidelberg. He subsequently joined the faculty at the UCLA, and in 1992, he was appointed Professor of Organic Chemistry at the ETH Zurich. Diederich’s research interests include molecular recognition, medicinal chemistry, and supramolecular nanomaterials. Diederich is also on the Editorial or Advisory Boards of Chemistry—An Asian Journal, Chemistry—A European Journal, and ChemMedChem.

Kuiling Ding (Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry (SIOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences) studied at Zhengzhou University and completed his PhD (supervised by Yangjie Wu) at Nanjing University in 1990. He was subsequently made assistant professor at Zhengzhou University, and spent periods as a research fellow with Teruo Matsuura at Ryukoku University (1993–1994) and with Koichi Mikami at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (1997–1998). He was made Professor of Chemistry at the SIOC in 1999, and has been Director of the Institute since 2009. Themes of Ding’s research include an organometallic approach to the development of new methods and catalysts for organic synthesis.14 Ding is also on the Editorial or Advisory Boards of Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis, the Asian Journal of Organic Chemistry, Chemistry—A European Journal, ChemPlusChem, and the Chinese Journal of Chemistry.

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Marc Fontecave (Collège de France) studied at the École Normale Supérieure de l’Enseignement Technique, Cachan, and worked with Daniel Mansuy at the École Normale Supérieure, Paris, for his PhD (awarded in 1984). He subsequently joined the CNRS as a chargé de recherche, and from 1985–1986, he was a postdoctoral researcher with Peter Reichard at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm. He was made professor at the Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, in 1989, and in 2008, he was made professor at the Collège de France. Topics of Fontecave’s research program include the structure and reactivity of redox enzymes, the assembly of biological metal sites, and catalysts for artificial photosynthesis.15 Fontecave is also on the Editorial Advisory Board of ChemBioChem.

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John F. Hartwig (UC Berkeley) studied at Princeton University, and carried out his PhD (awarded in 1990) with Robert G. Bergman at the UC Berkeley. From 1990–1992, he was a postdoctoral researcher with Stephen J. Lippard at MIT, and in 1992, he started his independent career at Yale University. He moved to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2006, and was made Henry Rapoport Professor of Chemistry at the UC Berkeley in 2011. Hartwig is interested in organic synthesis, organometallic synthesis, and mechanistic analysis of catalytic systems using transition-metal complexes.16 Hartwig is also on the International Advisory Board of ChemCatChem.

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Eric N. Jacobsen (Harvard University) studied at New York University and worked with Robert G. Berman at the UC Berkeley for his PhD (awarded in 1986). From 1986–1988, he was a postdoctoral fellow with K. Barry Sharpless at the MIT, and in 1988, he joined the faculty at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In 1993, he moved to Harvard University, where he is currently Sheldon Emerey Professor of Chemistry. Jacobsen’s research involves the development of new synthetic methods, with particular emphasis on stereoselective synthesis.17 He is also on the Editorial or Advisory Boards of Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis, the Asian Journal of Organic Chemistry, and Chemistry—An Asian Journal.

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David A. Leigh (University of Manchester) studied at the University of Sheffield, where he was awarded his PhD in 1987 for work supervised by J. Fraser Stoddart. After postdoctoral work with David Bundle at the National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, he was made lecturer at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology. He moved to the University of Warwick in 1998, and to the University of Edinburgh in 2001. He was made Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Manchester in 2012. Leigh’s research interests include the development of new strategies for the synthesis of interlocked molecules, and the design and construction of artificial molecular motors and machines. His Review on this topic that was published in Angewandte Chemie in 200618 has been cited more than 1000 times.

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Ilan Marek (Technion–Israel Institute of Technology) worked with Jean Normant at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, for his PhD (awarded in 1988), and subsequently carried out postdoctoral research with Leon Ghosez at the Université catholique de Louvain. In 1990, he returned to the Université Pierre et Marie Curie as a CNRS researcher, and in 1997, he moved to the Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, where he is currently professor at the Schulich Faculty of Chemistry and Sir Michael and Lady Sobell Academic Chair. Marek’s research interests are focused on the design and development of new and efficient stereo- and enantioselective strategies for the synthesis of complex molecular structures.19 Marek is also on the Editorial or Advisory Boards of Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis, Chemistry—A European Journal, the European Journal of Organic Chemistry, the Israel Journal of Chemistry, and The Chemical Record.

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Kyoko Nozaki (University of Tokyo) studied at Kyoto University, where she completed her PhD (supervised by Kiitiro Utimoto) in 1991. She remained in Kyoto as an instructor in the group of Hidemasa Takaya, and subsequently as associate professor. In 2002, she joined the faculty at the University of Tokyo, where she was made professor in 2003. Nozaki’s research interests include homogeneous catalysis, and the synthesis and properties of π-conjugated compounds and organometallic compounds.20 Nozaki is also on the Editorial Board of ChemCatChem.

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Li-Jun Wan (Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences) studied at Dalian University of Technology. From 1987–1992, he was lecturer at the Dalian Maritime University, and from 1992–1993, he was a visiting scholar at Tohoku University, where he completed his PhD (supervised by Kingo Itaya) in 1996. After periods at the Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology/Japan Science and Technology Corporation (ERATO/JST) and Hokkaido University, he was made professor at the Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1999. He has also been professor at the Advanced Institute for Materials Research at Tohoku University since 2007. Wan’s research interests are in molecular assembly, scanning probe microscopy, and nanomaterials for energy and environmental applications.21 Wan is also on the Advisory Boards of Advanced Materials, the Asian Journal of Organic Chemistry, and Chemistry—An Asian Journal.

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Ralph Weissleder (Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS)) studied at the Universities of Freiburg and Heidelberg, and received his PhD (supervised by M. Bauer) from the latter institution in 1985. From 1986–1989, he was a postdoctoral researcher with Joseph Ferrucci and Thomas Brady at the NMR Center at MGH and HMS, and he is currently professor and radiologist at HMS, and Director of the Center for Systems Biology and the Center for Molecular Imaging Research at MGH. Weissleder’s research interests include the development of novel approaches for in vivo imaging.22 Weissleder is also on the Editorial Advisory Board of ChemistryOpen.

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Qi-Lin Zhou (Nankai University) studied at Lanzhou University, and received his PhD in 1987 for work supervised by Yao-Zeng Huang at the SIOC. After postdoctoral work with Zheng-Hua Zhu at the East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST; 1988–1990), Klaus Müllen at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Science (1990–1992), Andreas Pfaltz at the University of Basel (1992–1994), and Michael P. Doyle at Trinity University, San Antonio (1994–1996), he joined the faculty at the Institute of Fine Chemicals, ECUST. He moved to Nankai University in 1999, and is currently Director of the Institute of Elemento-organic Chemistry and the State Key Laboratory of Elemento-organic Chemistry, and Dean of the College of Chemistry. Zhou’s research interests include chiral ligands and catalysts, asymmetric hydrogenation, and catalytic asymmetric synthesis.23 Zhou is also on the Editorial or Advisory Boards of Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis and the Asian Journal of Organic Chemistry.

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