Cover Picture: An Efficient and Modular Route to Sequence-Defined Polymers Appended to DNA (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 18/2014)

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Abstract

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Sequence-controlled polymers attached to DNA can be prepared by solid-phase phosphoramidite coupling, as H. F. Sleiman, C. J. Serpell, and co-workers report in their Communication on page 4567 ff. Polymers with the same molecular composition but different monomer patterns exhibit different amphiphilic self-assembly. As the DNA component still retains base-pairing fidelity, these novel conjugates encode information in two distinct, and orthogonal, assembly languages.

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Sequence-controlled polymers attached to DNA can be prepared by solid-phase phosphoramidite coupling, as H. F. Sleiman, C. J. Serpell, and co-workers report in their Communication on page 4567 ff. Polymers with the same molecular composition but different monomer patterns exhibit different amphiphilic self-assembly. As the DNA component still retains base-pairing fidelity, these novel conjugates encode information in two distinct, and orthogonal, assembly languages.

Artificial Fingerprints

D. Liu and D. J. Broer show in their Communication on page 4542 ff. that artificial fingerprints can be switched between a flat state and a protruding state. The resulting friction changes allow use in a robot-like gripper.

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Bifunctional Nanopeapods

In their Communication on page 4614 ff., J. B. Wiley et al. report the synthesis and characterization of both gold and gold–Fe3O4 hexaniobate nanopeapods, which show variation in their optical and magnetic properties as a function of composition.

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Bismuth Polyanions

S. Dehnen and co-workers show in their Communication on page 4704 ff. that the [Bi11]3− ion, the first polycyclic bismuth polyanion, is formed in a surprisingly simple reaction of [K([2.2.2]crypt)]2(GaBi3) with the pyridine solvent.

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Ancillary