Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 27 Issue 10

October 1988

Volume 27, Issue 10

Pages 1227–1416

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 10/1988)

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198812271

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The title picture shows the luminescence of a Ni(CO)4 molecular beam after excitation with a xenon chloride UV laser. The pulsed molecular beam emerges from a nozzle (above in the picture, diameter ca. 50 μm) and expands conically. Interaction with the laser pulse leads to photolysis and formation of excited Ni(CO)3, which is responsible for the luminescence. In the center of the picture is the cone of a skimmer, the function of which is to admit only the core of the molecular beam through an opening (diameter < 1 mm) and thus collimate the beam. Such molecular beam experiments make it possible to investigate the physical-chemical basis of laser-activated gas-phase deposition of solids. Further, high-purity nickel films can be deposited on substrates in this way. More details on gas-phase deposition of thin metal and semiconductor films, as well as on high-quality powders for ceramics and on etching reactions for surface microstructuring, are reported by K. L. Kompa in a review article on p. 1314ff.

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Reviews
    6. Conference Report
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Conference Calendar
    1. Electron Transfer and Charge Transfer: Twin Themes in Unifying the Mechanisms of Organic and Organometallic Reactions (pages 1227–1266)

      Prof. Jay K. Kochi

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198812273

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      One mechanism is sufficient to describe numerous organic and organometallic reactions if the nucleophiles and electrophiles are also regarded as electron donors and electron acceptors, respectively. The resulting free energy relationship for electron transfer (FERET) makes it possible, for example, to describe such different reactions of TCNE as the cycloaddition to anthracene (equation image) and the insertion into M-X bonds (⊙) by a common linear free energy relationship.

    2. Tumor Lectinology: At the Intersection of Carbohydrate Chemistry, Biochemistry, Cell Biology, and Oncology (pages 1267–1276)

      Dr. Hans-Joachim Gabius

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198812671

      Lectins are sugar-binding proteins but neither sugar-specific enzymes nor antibodies. The natural targets of lectins are the sugar moieties of cellular glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans; such structural elements might be involved in information transfer and storage. Tumors offer a model system with which to study lectins, especially in connection with neoglycoproteins. The latter are proteins that are coupled chemically with (in part quite complex) sugar derivatives. An additional advantage of the tumor model is its use to test diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

    3. New Transition Metal Clusters with Ligands from Main Groups Five and Six (pages 1277–1296)

      Prof. Dr. Dieter Fenske, Dr. Johannes Ohmer, Dr. Johannes Hachgenei and Dr. Kurt Merzweiler

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198812771

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      Low- and high-molecular-weight clusters having unusual structures and valence-electron concentrations are accessible by reactions between halide complexes and silylated chalcogen and pnictogen compounds. One example of the many clusters described is 1, in which sulfur displays three types of coordination. Such compounds provide information of importance to both solid-state and complex chemistry.

    4. High Oxidation State Organometallic Chemistry, A Challenge—the Example of Rhenium (pages 1297–1313)

      Prof. Dr. Wolfgang A. Herrmann

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198812971

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      “By no means is it of merit to make an accidental discovery. Much more important is the recognition of possible consequences that might result from serendipity.” Trioxo(η5-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)rhenium(VII) 1, prepared by chance several years ago, has proved to be a versatile compound, the methyl analogue of which, 2, has also borne fruit. These compounds have enhanced our understanding of olefin metathesis, the oxidative coupling of alkynes, and the oxidation of olefins. Perhaps it will soon be possible to synthesize the WO3 and OsO3 relatives, 3 and 4, respectively.

    5. Laser Photochemistry at Surfaces—Laser-Induced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Related Phenomena (pages 1314–1325)

      Prof. Dr. Karl L. Kompa

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813141

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      Laser chemistry can be employed in thin film deposition as well as in (structuring) ablation and etching. In general, reactions at surfaces can be initiated or assisted with lasers, as shown by the diverse examples in this article. One such possibility is the surface deposition of highly disperse powders, for example, silicon carbide, from the gas phase. Such powders are starting materials for high-performance ceramics.

  2. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Reviews
    6. Conference Report
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Conference Calendar
    1. [Au2Ag4L4]2⊖, [Au2Cu4L4]2⊖, [Au3Cu3L4]2⊖, [Cu4L3]2⊖, and [Ag9L6]3⊖ (L = ethane-1,2-dithiolate)—Novel Homoleptic Complexes of the Coinage Metals, including the First Heteronuclear Metal Thiolates (pages 1326–1329)

      Priv.-Doz. Dr. Gerald Henkel, Prof. Dr. Bernt Krebs, Dr. Peter Betz, Heidrun Fietz and Dr. Karlheinz Saatkamp

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The heteronuclear M6S8 cages A describe the structures of 1 and 2, which are formed from AgNO3 and CuCl2 or CuCl, respectively, ethanedithiolate (L), and [AuBr2]. A homonuclear analogue of A is still unknown, since the combination of linear and trigonal-planar coordination is difficult to attain with a heavy element. The structure 3 can be regarded as a distorted sulfur icosahedron enclosing a likewise distorted silver cube with a further silver atom at the center.

      • equation image
    2. Is the Molecule BOK Quasi-Linear? (pages 1329–1330)

      Priv.-Doz. Dr. Pavel Rosmus

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813291

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Most likely, yes—at least, that is the answer based on the results of SCF calculations. The interconversion of the two equivalent bent equilibrium structures via the linear structure BOK requires an activation energy of only 2 kJ mol−1, which is probably supplied by the zero-point vibrational energy.

    3. Triazatrimetallabenzenes, a New Class of Inorganic Heterocycles; Synthesis and Structure of [Cp*TaN(Cl)]3 (pages 1330–1331)

      Dipl.-Chem. Herbert Plenio, Prof. Dr. Herbert W. Roesky, Dr. Mathias Noltemeyer and Prof. Dr. George M. Sheldrick

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813301

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Compound 1 may be viewed as a cyclic trimer of a tantalum nitride and provides support for the postulated stability of benzene-like metal nitride trimers. Compound 1 was obtained in 67% yield from [Cp*TaCl4] and N(SnMe3)3 and displays a six-membered ring, which, however, is not fully planar.

    4. π Complexes of an Amino-9-fluorenylideneborane (pages 1331–1337)

      Scott Helm and Prof. Dr. Heinrich Nöth

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813311

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The amino(methylene)borane 1 can be complexed as an η2 and as an η5 ligand. Whereas TiCl4 coordinates in an η5 fashion to the five-membered ring (2) with transfer of a Cl atom to the B atom, reaction of 1 and Fe2(CO)9 gives compound 3 containing an Fe[BOND]B[BOND]C ring; in 3, Fe is coordinated in a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal fashion.

    5. Ethylenedithione (C2S2): Generation and Characterization by Neutralization-Reionization Mass Spectrometry (pages 1337–1339)

      Dipl.-Chem. Detlev Sülzle and Prof. Dr. Helmut Schwarz

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813371

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dissociative ionization of the tetrathiapentalenedione 1 and the dithiodiamide 2 affords the radical cation of ethylenedithione 3. C2Smath image can be neutralized in a collision experiment to give 3, whose existence has been predicted theoretically.

    6. The Structures of Perchloric Acid, HClO4, and Its Anhydride, Cl2O7 (pages 1339–1341)

      Prof. Dr. Arndt Simon and Horst Borrmann

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813391

      Crystals of the title compounds contain practically isolated HClO4 molecules and Cl2O7 molecules best described as (ClOmath image)2O2⊖. Solid perchloric acid can be described as rods of H-bridged molecules forming a closest rod packing (O-HċO: 82 and 203 pm, respectively), solid dichlorine heptoxide as cubic close-packed oxygen atoms, the neighboring tetrahedral gaps being occupied by chlorine atoms.

    7. A New Approach to Ionic Ozonides (pages 1341–1342)

      Dipl.-Chem. Werner Hesse and Prof. Dr. Martin Jansen

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813411

      Tetramethylammonium ozonide, N(CH3)4O3, is surprisingly stable! It forms red, transparent crystals, which only decompose above 75 °C. Till now, the thermally very labile alkali-metal ozonides were thought to be the most stable ionic ozonides. The possibility of developing a preparative chemistry involving ionic ozonides was therefore viewed with pessimism. N(CH3)4O3 was synthesized by double reaction of KO3 with N(CH3)4O2 in NH3. This route to ionic ozonides should prove to be general.

    8. 3- and 3,6-Silylated 2-Pyridinethiols: New Hindered Bidentate Ligands and Their Novel Silver and Copper Clusters (pages 1342–1344)

      Prof. Eric Block, Michael Gernon, Hyunkyu Kang and Prof. Jon Zubieta

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813421

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      Analogous hexanuclear, paddlewheel complexes are formed by reaction of AgI and CuI precursors with the new ligand 3-tri-methylsilyl-2-pyridinethiol. MS2N coordination has thus been achieved for the first time (see right, • = metal). The large Me3Si group of the ligand prevents polymerization, which is observed for complexes of the parent compound. The ligand is accessible by silylation of 2-pyridinethiol.

    9. Reactions of Pentacarbonyl(trichloromethyl isocyanide)chromium (pages 1344–1347)

      Dr. Gerhard Beck and Prof. Dr. Wolf P. Fehlhammer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813441

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      A broad palette of organometallic compounds can be synthesized from the readily accessible 1, which exhibits two mutually reinforcing electrophilic centers, the isocyano unit and the halogenated α-C atom. The high synthetic potential of 1, as well as its 2-azaalleniumylidene and dichlorocarbene nature, are exemplified by preparation of 2–4.

    10. Tentacled Iron Sandwiches (pages 1347–1349)

      Ing. Françoise Moulines and Prof. Didier Astruc

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813471

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      A sixfold alkyl chain extension, the reaction of 1 with tBuOK and H2C[DOUBLE BOND]CH[BOND]CH2Br in THF to give 2, was achieved in one step in quantitative yield. The FeII center of 2 can be completely and reversibly reduced but not oxidized (with Br2). Instead, bromine adds in a 1,3 fashion to all terminal C[DOUBLE BOND]C bonds. The hexaalkylbenzene ligand can be released from 2 by irradiation. [Fe] = [(η5-C5H5)Fe].

    11. Phosphane-Stabilized CuI and AgI Silanes (pages 1349–1350)

      Prof. Alan H. Cowley, Tammy M. Elkins, Prof. Richard A. Jones and Dr. Christine M. Nunn

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813491

      The Cu[BOND]Si bond in 1a is 2.34 Å long; 1a is the first neutral compound containing this structural element. Compound 1a is formed in 65% yield by reaction of CuCl with Ph3SiLi and Me3P (1:1:3) in THF. Compound 1b, the first compound with an Ag[BOND]Si bond, can be prepared in a similar way.

      • equation image
    12. First Direct Evidence for Nitrile Imine-Diazo Isomerization. Synthesis of Relatively Stable N-Silylated Nitrile Imines (pages 1350–1351)

      Michel Granier, Dr. Antoine Baceiredo and Dr. Guy Bertrand

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813501

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The title reaction 1a [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] 1b takes place between −78 and +55 °C, the rearrangement temperature depending on the substituents. The nitrile imines 1a can be characterized in solution by NMR and IR spectroscopy. Compounds 1a, E = SiMe3 and SiPh3, have also been trapped with methanol and with methyl acrylate (cycloaddition).

    13. Reactivity of (R)-2-tert-Butyldihydrooxazole Derivatives Prepared from Serine and Threonine: Novel, Versatile Chiral Building Blocks (pages 1351–1353)

      Prof. Dr. Dieter Seebach and Dipl.-Chem. Gerhard Stucky

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813511

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      The unsaturated cyclic N,O-acetals 1 and 2 are promising starting materials for the synthesis of further valuable chiral intermediates. They were prepared from serine and threonine, respectively, by electrochemical decarboxylation. Acylation and addition reactions as well as catalytic hydrogenation were used to convert 1 and 2 into the mono-, bi-, and tricyclic compounds of type 3, in a regio- and stereoselective fashion.

    14. A New Cubane Cluster with the [MoFe3S4]0 Core and Possible Relevance to the Fe3-Centers in Ferredoxins. The Synthesis, Structure and Properties of the [Fe3S4(SEt)3Mo(CO)3]3⊖ Anion (pages 1353–1355)

      Prof. Dr. Dimitri Coucouvanis, Saleem Al-Ahmad, Athanasios Salifoglou, W. Richard Dunham and Richard H. Sands

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813531

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      The cluster anion 1 may be described as a weak complex of the fragment Mo(CO)3 and [Fe3S4(SEt)3]3⊖. An Fe oxidation state of + 2.67 was determined for 1 from the isomer shift in the Mössbauer spectrum. This finding indicates the presence of Mo0 in 1. In agreement with this conclusion are the positions of the CO stretching frequencies in the IR spectrum of 1.

    15. Convenient Routes to Di-tert-butylsilanediyl: Chemical, Thermal and Photochemical Generation (pages 1355–1356)

      Prof. Dr. Philip Boudjouk, Upasiri Samaraweera, Dr. Ratnasabapathy Sooriyakumaran, Dr. Jerzy Chrusciel and Kevin R. Anderson

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813551

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      α-Elimination from 1 and thermal or photochemical cleavages of 2 produce tBu2Si:, the trapping or subsequent products of which can be isolated in good to very good yields. The silanediyl generated from 1a by α-elimination does not dimerize to tBu4Si2, but instead produces the four-membered ring compound 3 in 15% yield.

    16. The Microwave Spectrum and Structure of the Ethylene–Sulfur Dioxide Complex (pages 1356–1358)

      Marabeth S. LaBarge, Kurt W. Hillig II and Prof. Dr. Robert L. Kuczkowski

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813561

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      The simplest π complex of SO2 with an organic molecule—C2H4 · SO2—was formed by ultrasonic expansion of a C2H4[BOND]SO2[BOND]Ne gas mixture. The structure derived from the microwave spectrum reveals that the SO2 and C2H4 planes are nearly parallel (Cs symmetry) and separated by 3.509 Å. The splitting pattern in the spectrum indicates the existence of a tunneling process between equivalent structures.

    17. Solubilization of Elemental Sulfur in Water by Cationic and Anionic Surfactants (pages 1358–1359)

      Prof. Dr. Ralf Steudel and Gabriele Holdt

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813581

      The solubility of S8 in water is increased by a factor of 5000 when surfactants are added. This is surprising since elemental sulfur is especially hydrophobic and is neither wetted nor dissolved by water. The solubilization of S8 in aqueous surfactant solutions explains, for example, how sulfur bacteria are able to transport S8 into the cell, where it is oxidized to sulfate: the bacteria secrete surfactant molecules.

    18. 1,4-Diphosphabutatriene (pages 1360–1361)

      Prof. Dr. Gottfried Märkl and Dipl.-Chem. Peter Kreitmeier

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813601

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The first species having a

      partial structure, the E/Z-isomeric diphosphabutatriene derivatives 1, were prepared according to a synthetic principle similar to the Wittig-Peterson condensation. Compound 1 is a stable, yellow, crystalline compound.

    19. Novel Layer Structure of Sodium Calix[4]arenesulfonate Complexes—a Class of Organic Clay Mimics? (pages 1361–1362)

      Dr. Anthony W. Coleman, Dr. Simon G. Bott, S. David Morley, Dr. C. Mitchell Means, Kerry D. Robinson, Dr. Hongming Zhang and Prof. Jerry L. Atwood

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813611

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The crystalline sodium salt of calix[4]arene-sulfonate 1 consists of alternating organic and inorganic layers. Double layers of the basketlike pentaanions alternate with layers of sodium ions and water molecules; the similarity with the structures of clays is readily apparent. Acetone is bound in the cavity of 1, the O atom projecting into the hydrophilic layer (see right).

      • equation image
    20. A Photolytic Entry into Oxepane Systems (pages 1362–1364)

      Prof. K. C. Nicolaou, Dr. C.-K. Hwang and D. A. Nugiel

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813621

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      Saturated seven-membered rings containing an O atom—oxepanes— are found increasingly in nature. A new, highly promising strategy for the synthesis of oxepanes 3 starts from the dithionoesters 1, which, upon irradiation, cyclize with loss of S2 to give the olefins 2. Regioselective hydrolysis with tautomerization leads finally to the oxepanes 3.

    21. Cs2Bi10Ca6Cl12O16: A New Type of Catalyst for Selective Oxidation Derived from Bismuth Oxychloride (pages 1364–1365)

      Kenneth D. M. Harris, Dr. Wataru Ueda, Prof. Dr. John M. Thomas and Dr. Gallienus W. Smith

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813641

      The title compound 1 is suitable for catalytic oxidative coupling of methane to give ethylene and ethane and for structural comparison with high-temperature superconductors. Compound 1 was obtained, as shown below, in an open crucible at 800°C. As catalyst, it leads to 40% ethylene and 12% ethane for 21% conversion. Compound 1 has an interesting layer structure. The Bi3⊕ and Ca2⊕ ions can occupy the same positions, but are not randomly distributed. Similar structures have been postulated for high-temperature super-conductors.

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    22. Solid-Phase Synthesis of O-Glycopeptide Sequences (pages 1365–1367)

      Prof. Dr. Hans Paulsen, Dipl.-Chem. Gunnar Merz and Dipl.-Chem. Udo Weichert

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813651

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      4-Alkoxybenzyl alcohol resins are suitable supports for the solid-phase synthesis of O-glycopeptides. This was shown by the syntheses of the hexapeptides 1 and 2 in 55 and 48% yield, respectively, based on the first amino acid to be coupled. β-Elimination, racemization, or glycoside cleavage were not observed.

    23. Does a 1,1′-Diazaferrocene Exist? (pages 1368–1369)

      Prof. Dr. Norbert Kuhn, Dipl.-Chem. Eva-Maria Horn, Dr. Roland Boese and Dipl.-Chem. Norbert Augart

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813681

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      Yes and no could be the answer to the question posed in the title. Although it was not possible to detect the diazaferrocene 1, the complex 1 · 2 C4Me4NH was in fact isolated and characterized. It was formed according to reaction sequence (a).

    24. Tricyclo[3.1.0.02,6]hexanedione (the Valene of o-Benzoquinone), Bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane-2,3-dione, and Valenes of a Quinoxaline, of Phenazine, and of a Benzophenazine (pages 1369–1370)

      Prof. Dr. Manfred Christl and Dipl.-Chem. Arno Kraft

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813691

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Swern oxidation is ideal for the transformation of strainedcis-1,2-cyclo-pentanediols such as 1 to α-diketones such as 2. Compound 2, the valene of o-benzoquinone, is thus readily accessible. Its synthetic potential is demonstrated by the construction of other valenes, such as 3 (reaction of 2 with diaminomaleonitrile).

    25. A Monomeric Diboryldilithiomethane with a 1,3-Diborataallene Structure (pages 1370–1372)

      Monika Pilz, Jürgen Allwohn, Dr. Ralf Hunold, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Werner Massa and Prof. Dr. Armin Berndt

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813701

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      The title compound 2 is characterized by many interesting features: 2 is the first dilithiomethane stabilized by two boryl substituents; NMR and X-ray data establish its 1,3-diborataallene structure. In contrast to known dilithio-methane derivatives, which are aggregated, 2 is monomeric (R = 2,4,6-Me3C6H2).

    26. Catalytic Syntheses of Functionalized Nitrogen Heterocycles from Cyanogen (pages 1372–1373)

      Dipl.-Chem. Jörg Sundermeyer and Prof. Dr. Herbert W. Roesky

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813721

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      The synthesis of nitrogen heterocycles such as 1 and 2 from cyanogen and oxalyl halides is possible in one step and in yields of 60–70% with the catalyst system NRmath imageX/HX, X = Cl, Br. Compound 1 can be easily cleaved to give functionalized imidazoles, and 2 is of interest owing to its bactericidal activity as well as its possible use as a synthetic building block.

    27. Metal-free Carbanion Salts as Initiators for the Anionic Polymerization of Acrylic and Methacrylic Acid Esters (pages 1373–1374)

      Prof. Dr. Manfred T. Reetz, Dr. Thomas Knauf, Dipl.-Chem. Ulrich Minet and Carsten Bingel

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813731

      Molecular weights of up to 20 000 are attained in the polymerization of butyl acrylates with the malonates 1; the ratio of weight average molecular weight to number average molecular weight is ≤ 1.3. The likewise metal-free salts 2 and 3 also smoothly polymerize acrylic esters in THF or toluene at room temperature. The explanation for this behavior, which differs from that of the corresponding sodium or potassium salts, could be that metal ions are necessary as activators for the typical terminating reactions of anionic polymerization. Compounds 1–3 are readily accessible and may be stored for months at 0 °C.

      • equation image
    28. 5-Isopropyliden-1,2-oxathiole 2-Oxide by Photoisomerization of 2,2-Dimethyl-3(2H)-thiophenone 1-Oxide (pages 1374–1375)

      Dipl.-Chem. Ronald Kowalewski and Prof. Dr. Paul Margaretha

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813741

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      The cyclic s-trans-1,3-dienes 3 are novel, highly promising synthetic intermediates. They may be obtained easily and selectively from the cyclic ketovinyl sulfoxides 2. This photoreaction is surprising, for the compounds 1 react completely differently upon irradiation. The photoisomerization of 2 presumably occurs via the diradical 4 as intermediate.

    29. The p-Nitrocinnamyloxycarbonyl (Noc) Moiety—an Acid-stable Amino-protecting Group Removable under Neutral Conditions for Peptide and Glycopeptide Synthesis (pages 1375–1377)

      Prof. Dr. Horst Kunz and Dipl.-Chem. Joachim März

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813751

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      The bond between the new protecting group 1 and the amino groups of amino acids is very acid stable. However, it can be easily and quantitatively cleaved under almost neutral conditions by Pd0 catalysis. Further advantages of the protecting group 1 are its strong UV absorption and its stability in the RhI-catalyzed cleavage of “normal” allyl protecting groups; in addition, the amino acids containing these protecting groups are almost always crystalline.

    30. A Donor Cage with Bent Tetrathiafulvalene Moiety (pages 1377–1379)

      Dipl.-Chem. Jorg Röhrich, Dipl.-Chem. Peter Wolf, Dr. Volker Enkelmann and Prof. Dr. Klaus Müllen

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813771

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The chemical and electronic properties of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) change appreciably when the molecule is bent. In the title compounds 1, R = OPr or OHex, such a structure is present. The cage compound 1 is readily accessible and the (solubility-improving) substituents R may be varied.

    31. Paraformaldehyde as Possible Chirality Amplifier (pages 1379–1381)

      Univ.-Doz. Dr. Christian R. Noe, Prof. Dr. Max Knollmüller and Dipl.-Ing. Peter Ettmayer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813791

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      Can enantiomerically pure oligooxymethylene helices induce chirality by means of stereoelectronic effects? This question was investigated by use of the model compounds 1, n = 1–4. The asymmetric induction—determined by nucleophilic methylation—occurred in the same direction in all cases. This finding indicates that paraformaldehyde may have been involved in the amplification of chirality during the course of chemical evolution.

    32. Solid State Structure of a Lithium Triorganostannate (pages 1381–1382)

      Prof. Dr. Michael Veith, Dipl.-Chem. Cornelius Ruloff, Dr. Volker Huch and Dr. Fritz Töllner

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813811

      The first details of the coordination sphere of lithium triorganostannates have been obtained with lithium tris(α-furyl)stannate 1. The compound may be formulated as an ion pair. In the anion, the lithium ion exhibits an unusual, distorted octahedral oxygen coordination. The tin atoms are, as expected, coordinated in a pyramidal fashion.

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    33. A Novel Entry to the PC-Double Bond: the “Phospha-Wittig” Reaction (pages 1382–1384)

      Dr. Angela Marinetti and Prof. Dr. François Mathey

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813821

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Phosphorylphosphane complexes 1 are the ideal starting compounds for the preparation of “phospha-Wittig” reagents 2, which react with aldehydes and ketones to give the corresponding phosphaalkene complexes 3. These can be isolated directly or after trapping with, for example, MeOH or cyclopentadiene. Liberation of the phosphaalkene from 3 should also be possible. R = Me, Ph.

  3. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Reviews
    6. Conference Report
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Conference Calendar
    1. Book Review: Multinuclear NMR. Edited by J. Mason (pages 1386–1387)

      Bernd Wrackmeyer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813861

  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Reviews
    6. Conference Report
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Conference Calendar
    1. Intelligent Materials—A New Frontier (pages 1389–1392)

      Prof. Hiroaki Yanagida

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198813891

  5. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Reviews
    6. Conference Report
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Conference Calendar
    1. Better High-Tech Ceramics by Improved Processing (pages 1401–1403)

      Wolfgang A. Kaysser

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198814011

    2. Advanced Concepts for Ceramic Toughening (pages 1403–1404)

      H. Schubert and R. Brook

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198814031

    3. Polymer Crystals (page 1405)

      I. G. Voigt-Martin

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198814051

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Reviews
    6. Conference Report
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Conference Calendar
    1. NMR Imaging of Materials (pages 1406–1407)

      Bernhard Blümich

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198814061

  7. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Reviews
    6. Conference Report
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Conference Calendar
    1. Book Review: Physics at Surfaces. By A. Zangwill (pages 1409–1410)

      Cynthia M. Friend

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198814092

  8. Conference Calendar

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Reviews
    6. Conference Report
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Conference Calendar
    1. Conference Calender (pages 1412–1416)

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198814121

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