Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 27 Issue 12

December 1988

Volume 27, Issue 12

Pages 1593–1785

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 12/1988)

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198815931

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      The cover picture shows a two-dimensional 13C-NMR spectrum of solid polyoxymethylene. The polymer chains in the crystalline regions of polyoxymethylene are arranged helically. With the help of 2D-NMR spectra the mechanisms of extremely slow molecular motions, which have a decisive influence on the mechanical properties of the polymers, can be interpreted. In the present case the 2D-NMR spectrum images the rotation of the polymer chains about the axis of the helix. It consists of a diagonal part, which resembles a conventional spectrum along a frequency axis and comes from chain molecules which have still not rotated at the measuring temperature of 90°C even after an observation time of two seconds. In addition, an exchange figure extending far into the two-dimensional frequency plane can be recognized; it resembles an ellipse, and is generated by such chain molecules which have rotated exactly once during the same period of time. This provides an example demonstrating that completely new information about molecular structure, order and dynamics in solid polymers is accessible with newly developed 2D-NMR spectroscopic methods. B. Blümich and H. W. Spiess describe how such spectra are obtained and interpreted in a review article on page 1655 ff.

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Conference Calendar
    10. Author Index
    11. Subject Index
    1. Under the Surface of the Chemical Article (pages 1593–1602)

      Prof. Roald Hoffmann

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198815933

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      Science depends on argument. This is one of eight theses in which the author summarizes his personal view of chemistry and which the cartoon on the right illustrates. In his essay, which is based on a lecture presented at the Chemiedozententagung held in Mainz on March 14, 1988 and at a special session of which the 100th anniversary of Angewandte Chemie was celebrated, Roald Hoffmann pleads for a revival of the personal, emotional style when describing the efforts made to discover and creatively extend the world of molecules.

    2. The Chemistry of Amino Imino Boranes (pages 1603–1623)

      Prof. Dr. Heinrich Nöth

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198816031

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      Dicoordinated boron compounds no longer count among the “exotic” species in boron chemistry. A special position is taken by the title compounds 1. The amino group enhances the reactivity of imino boranes on the one hand and increases their kinetic stability on the other. Thus the typical amino imino boranes 1a add carbonylmetal compounds to form complexes 2. Cycloaddition reactions using amino imino boranes open up a new heterocyclic chemistry of boron; an example is the formation of 3 from 1a and tetracyanoethylene.

    3. Structure and Reactivity of Lithium Enolates. From Pinacolone to Selective C-Alkylations of Peptides. Difficulties and Opportunities Afforded by Complex Structures (pages 1624–1654)

      Prof. Dr. Dieter Seebach

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198816241

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      “Supramolecules”–complex aggregates held together by noncovalent bonds– may dramatically influence the result of seemingly simple standard reactions of organic synthesis. This can be demonstrated by the chemistry of lithium enolates. Crystallographic investigations have provided a wealth of detailed information. The most remarkable features of these structures are aggregation to give dimers etc. and complexation of the metal centers by solvent molecules and chelating ligands. The presence in nonpolar solvents of the same supramolecules has been established NMR spectroscopically. Consideration of these findings improves our understanding of the reactivity of lithium enolates. The route from the deprotonated ketone via enolate and metal enolate to the solvated supramolecule is outlined below.

    4. Two-Dimensional Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: New Possibilities for the Investigation of the Structure and Dynamics of Solid Polymers [New Analytical Methods (38)] (pages 1655–1672)

      Priv. Doz. Dr. Bernhard Blümich and Prof. Dr. Hans Wolfgang Spiess

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198816551

      With 2D solid-state NMR spectroscopy it is possible to determine the orientional distribution functions of molecular segments in drawn polymers and to distinguish different mechanisms of complex molecular motions. The strength of the orientation-dependent spin interactions in the solid and the resulting breadth of the spectra require a very efficient apparatus and involved methods. This review shows, however, what in the meanwhile is possible in 2D-solid-state NMR spectroscopy and with which methods it has been achieved.

    5. Uniform Heterogeneous Catalysts: The Role of Solid-State Chemistry in their Development and Design (pages 1673–1691)

      Prof. Dr. John M. Thomas

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198816731

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      What have zeolites, Ba2Bi2−xLaxO6−y and enzymes in common? All three are uniform heterogeneous catalysts, i.e., they are monophasic solids in which the activity centers are envisaged as being dispersed in a spatially uniform fashion throughout their bulk. This description naturally holds true for enzymes only when they are present in crystalline form, they also fulfill their function as individual molecules in homogeneous solution; however, as demonstrated in this article much can be learned from a comparison of heterogeneous catalysts with enzymes. The picture on the right shows (above) the structure of the important zeolite catalyst ZSM-5 with 5.5 Å-channels and (below) an electron micrograph.

  2. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Conference Calendar
    10. Author Index
    11. Subject Index
    1. 1,6-Methano[10]annulene Dianion, a Paratropic 12π-Electron Dianion with a C10 Perimeter (pages 1692–1693)

      Dipl.-Chem. Dietmar Schmalz and Prof. Dr. Harald Günther

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198816921

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      A ca. 12 ppm downfield shift of the NMR signal of the methano protons and 4–6 ppm upfield shift of the signals of the perimeter protons are observed upon reduction of 1 to the dianion 12⊖ with lithium sand in THF at −80°C. This confirms that 12⊖ is a strongly paratropic 12 π-electron system. The electronic structure of 12⊖, which gives 1 again with O2, very closely resembles that of the naphthalene dianion.

    2. Titanium(0) Arene Complexes: Synthesis and X-ray Crystal Structure of [η6-C10H8Ti{tBuSi(CH2PMe2)3}] (pages 1693–1695)

      Thomas G. Gardner and Prof. Dr. Gregory S. Girolami

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198816931

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An unusually strong metal-arene back-bonding characterizes the bonding in the title complex 1, which is obtained in the form of deep purple-red, air-stable crystals on reduction of [TiCl3(trimpsi)(thf)], trimpsi = tBuSi(CH2PMe2)3, with naphthalenesodium in THF. This 16e-complex has an overall three-legged piano-stool geometry, and the π-bonded naphthalenring has partial dienediyl character.

    3. Metal-Ion-Selective Exchange Resins by Matrix Imprint with Methacrylates (pages 1695–1697)

      Prof. Dr. Wilhelm Kuchen and Dr. Jürgen Schram

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198816951

      Cu2⊕ ions could be removed form waste water selectively and down to levels below the limit of detection with ion-exchange resins in whcih copper(II) methacrylates had been used for their synthesis. This shows that the metal complexes present during the polymerization imprint the cavity structure of the resin such that ions of the same element are preferably taken up in the cavities after the elution of these metal ions.

    4. Protecting-Group-Dependent Stability of Intersaccharide Bonds—Synthesis of a Fucosyl-Chitobiose Glycopeptide (pages 1697–1699)

      Prof. Dr. Horst Kunz and Dr. Carlo Unverzagt

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198816971

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      Acetyl-protecting groups in the Fucose moiety stabilize the intersaccharide bonds of 1 such that they are not ruptured during the cleavage of the C-terminal tert-butyl protecting groups with trifluoroacetic acid. Benzyl-protecting groups do not bring about such a stabilization. This effect, which is important for planning and carrying out the synthesis of complex glycopeptides, enables the construction from 1 of a trisaccharide hexapeptide which corresponds to a partial structure of the linking region of the envelop protein of a leukemia virus.

    5. Synthesis and Structure of [MeAlN(2,6-iPr2C6H3)]3: An Aluminum-Nitrogen Analogue of Borazine (pages 1699–1700)

      Krista M. Waggoner, Prof. Håkon Hope and Prof. Philip P. Power

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198816991

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A predominantly plannar Al3N3C6 core characterizes the structure of 1, the first trimeric iminoalane. The bond length equalization suggests a delocalization of the π-electrons and thus an analogy to borazoles. 1 is formed in a two-step reaction from AlMe3 and 2,6-diisopropylaniline with cleavage of methane. Aryl = 2,6-iPr2C6H3.

    6. Novel Anionic Aryl Complexes of RhIII: [Rh(C6F5)5]2⊖ and [Rh(C6F5)4(CO)2] (pages 1700–1702)

      Dr. María P. García, Prof. Dr. Luis A. Oro and Dr. Fernando J. Lahoz

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817001

      The RhIII complexes 2 and 3 are very stable, both in the solid state as well as in solution. The square-pyramidal complex 2 is formed on reaction of 1 with LiC6F5, and can be carbonylated with CO to the octahedral complex 3, which is also accessible by reaction of the Rh1 complex [RhCl(CO)2]2 with LiC6F5 + BrC6F5. 2 and 3 should be suitable starting compounds for the synthesis of homo- and heteronuclear metal clusters.

      • equation image
    7. Soluble Chromium Selenides and Tellurides: Preparation and Structures of [(C6H5)4P]3[Cr3Te24] and [C6H54P]3[Cr3Se24] (pages 1702–1703)

      Walter A. Flomer, Samuel C. O'Neal, William T. Pennington, David Jeter, Prof. A. Wallace Cordes and Prof. Joseph W. Kolis

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Anhydrous CrCl3 reacts with DMF solutions of polyselenides and polytellurides to give the cluster anions [Cr3E24]3⊖, E = Se, Te. The anions each consist of a linear array of chromium atoms which are linked by six Emath image chains. Both cluster anions are the largest transition-metal chalcogenides reported so far, and the first soluble selenido- and telluridochromates. A view along the Cr3 axis is shown on the right.

    8. Acyl–Alkylidyne Coupling in the Synthesis of Dinuclear Complexes (pages 1703–1705)

      Ian J. Hart, Dr. John C. Jeffery, Rachel M. Lowry and Prof. Dr. F. Gordon A. Stone

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817031

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      The novel complexes 1 and 2 have model character for intermediates of the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. They can be prepared from [Mn(Me)(CO)5] and [M(Me)(CO)3(η-C5H5)], M [DOUBLE BOND] Mo, W, respectively, and alkylidynetungsten complexes. 1 has an unusually short W[BOND]Mn bond (2.696(1) Å), probably as a result of the bridging by the RC[BOND]C(O)Me ligands.

    9. 2,2′,7,7′-Tetrahydroxy-1,1′-binaphthyl: a Versatile Chiral Spacer for Novel Mono- and Ditopic Cyclophane Hosts with Apolar Binding Sites (pages 1705–1711)

      Prof. Dr. Frančois Diederich, Matthew R. Hester and Mike A. Uyeki

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817051

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      The simultaneous binding of K ions and neutral naphthalene derivatives can be achieved with the novel host compound 1. As expected, a marked difference in the solvent-dependence of the two binding processes could be demonstrated 1H-NMR spectroscopically. Both the small as well as the large grooves of the central 2,2′,7,7′-tetrahydroxy-1,1′-binaphthyl moiety in 1 are utilized.

    10. A Donor-Acceptor Substituted Quinoid Pentalene (pages 1711–1713)

      Dr. Toyonari Sugimoto, Akihiko Sakai, Toshiki Takahashi, Hiroshi Ando, Tatsushi Okuda, Prof. Dr. Zen-ichi Yoshida, Prof. Dr. Yasushi Kai, Nobuko Kanehisa and Prof. Dr. Nobutami Kasai

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817111

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      The title compound is not a Do/A-pentalene but a Do/A-“pentalenequinone”, as has been shown by an X-ray structure analysis and the 1H-NMR spectrum. Apparently, the formation of this structure is a possibility to circumvent antiaromatic destabilization by the eight π-electrons of the pentalene. 1 forms stable, blue-violet crystals of m.p. 220°C.

    11. Synthesis, Structure and Bonding in the Donor-Acceptor Complex [tBu2PSe2]ṁ[PNAryl]: En Route to the P[TRIPLE BOND]N Bond (pages 1713–1714)

      Prof. Dr. Edgar Niecke, Martin Nieger, Dipl.-Chem. Franz Reichert and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang W. Schoeller

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817131

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      An iminophosphenium (monophoshadiazonium) ion is present in the adduct 3, which is formed upon reaction of the iminophosphane 1 with selenium in the ratio 1:2. The P-N distance (ca. 150 pm) in 3 is markedly shorter than in iminophosphanes. This and the valence angle at the N atom (ca. 170°) suggest a high proportion of triple bonding in the PN aryl moiety 3. The structure of this adduct can also be regarded as a “frozen-in transition state” of an intramolecular selenium exchange reaction.

    12. Arylmino(halogeno)phosphanes XP[DOUBLE BOND]NC6H2tBu3 (X [DOUBLE BOND] Cl, Br, I) and the Iminophosphenium Tetrachloroaluminate [P[TRIPLE BOND]NC6H2tBu3][AlCl4]: the First Stable Compound with a PN Triple Bond (pages 1715–1716)

      Prof. Dr. Edgar Niecke, Martin Nieger and Dipl.-Chem. Franz Reichert

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817151

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      The cation 4 can be obtained in an amazingly simple raction sequence from phosphorus trichloride 1 and the arylamine 2 via the iminophosphane 3. Spectroscopic findings—δ(31P) = 79.3—and structural data—PNC angle = 177°, PN distance = 147.5 pm—suggest the presence of a triple bond, whereby 4 is isoelectronic with :Si[TRIPLE BOND]N–aryl.

    13. Electrocatalytic Haloform Reaction: Transformation of Methyl Ketones into Methyl Esters (pages 1716–1717)

      Prof. Dr. Gennady I. Nikishin, Dr. Michail N. Elinson and Dr. Irina V. Makhova

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817161

      Neither free halogen nor halogenite has to be used for the haloform reaction if it is carried out electrocatalytically. Reduction of 1 (R = Ph, 1-naphthyl, Me(CH2)5, iPr, PhCH[DOUBLE BOND]CH) in MeOH in the presence of NaBr at 30 °C and a constant current density of 220 mA cm−2 suffices in order to obtain the methyl ester 2 in 61–68% yield. Under the same conditions ketones such as Ph[BOND]CO[BOND]Et afford α-hydroxyacetals, in the case of 1, R = PhCH2, on the other hand, predominantly the Favorski rearrangement product methyl 3-phenylpropionate is formed.

      • equation image
    14. The First Transition Metal Complex of a Thiepin; Synthesis of the Thermally Labile 1-Benzothiepin 1-Oxide from 1-Benzothiepin(tricarbonyl)iron (pages 1717–1718)

      Keitaro Nishino, Sumiko Ishigami, Yutaka Tamura, Kazuko Imagawa, Prof. Yoshikazu Ikutani and Prof. Dr. Ichiro Murata

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817171

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      The thermally labile benzothiepin 1-oxide 4 could be synthesized from benzothiepin 1 via intermediates which had been stabilized by complexation. The η4-coordination of Fe(CO)3 in 2 was confirmed NMR spectroscopically. The photolytic decomplexation of 3 afforded exclusively 4, which is completely transformed into naphthalene within 1 h at about 13 °C.

    15. Direct Michael Additions of Silyl Groups to α,β-Unsaturated β-Arylketones and an α-Benzylidenelactone with Mixtures Obtained from Copper(I) Cyanide, Butyllithium and Chlorosilanes (pages 1718–1719)

      Dipl.-Chem. Willi Amberg and Prof. Dr. Dieter Seebach

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817181

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      A considerable simplification of the Michael addition of silyl groups to enones of type 1 was accomplished with the quoted mixture of reagents. The products of type 2 were formed in good yields. 5-Benzylidene-2-tert-butyl-6-methyl-1,3-dioxan-4-one or open-chain enones with R1 = H, R2 = alkyl or aryl have thus far been employed as 1.

    16. [V19O41(OH)9]8⊖, An Ellipsoid-Shaped Cluster Anion Belonging to the Unusual Family of VIV/VV Oxygen Clusters (pages 1719–1721)

      Prof. Dr. Achim Müller, Michael Penk, Erich Krickemeyer, Dr. Hartmut Bögge and Heinz-Jürgen Walberg

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817191

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      Clearly distinguishable are the VIV and VV centers of the “outer shell” of the title anion 1, whose center forms a VO4 tetrahedron and a μ3-O atom. The nine μ2-O bridges between VIV centers (black) are protonated, the six between VIV and VV centers (hatched), on the other hand, are not. The formation of 1 confirms the unusual behavior of vanadium in polycondensation. The cross-hatched atom shows the second disordered position of the central V atom.

    17. A Novel Heterocluster with D3-Symmetry Containing Twenty-One Core Atoms: [Asmath imageVmath imageO42(H2O)]6⊖ (page 1721)

      Prof. Dr. Achim Müller and Joachim Döring

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817211

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      The vanadium atoms in the title anion form a spherical shell— “bulged” by As2O5 groups —around an enclosed H2O molecule. This was revealed by an X-ray structure analysis of the salt K6[As6V15O42(H2O)]ṁ8 H2O. The compound is very readily formed and crystallizes in the form of very large, brown rhombohedra.

    18. Rapid Detection of Manganese Deficiency in Conifer Needles by Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy (pages 1722–1724)

      Prof. Dr. Peter Laggner, Dr. Ruth Mandl, Annemarie Schuster, Monika Zechner and Prof. Dr. Dieter Grill

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817221

      ESR spectroscopic findings on spruce trees could form the basis of a rapid method for the detection of damage to conifers. The correlation between forrest damage and manganese deficiency in the case of conifers has already been reported. Three types of spectra (A, B, C) have now been distinguished. Types A and B are very similar to each other. They contain only weak signals; in the needles investigated, Mn contents of 20–90 and 6–30 ppm respectively were determined. Type C is the six-line spectrum of MnII (>50 ppm Mn). Only the needles of healthy trees gave ESR spectra of type C. Manganese deficiency, as demonstrated by the absence of type C spectra, is thus a good indicator for the recognition of damage to conifers.

    19. Formation of an Oxalate-filled Cavity in a Reduced Cyclic Octanuclear Polyoxomolybdate [(n-C4H9)4N]2[Mo8O16(OCH3)8(C2O4)] formed from α-[(n-C4H9)4N]4[Mo8O26] and Rhodizonic Acid (pages 1724–1725)

      Qin Chen, Shuncheng Liu and Prof. Dr. Jon Zubieta

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817241

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      An unusual complex with planar Mo8 eight-membered ring, the title compound 1, is formed by insertion of the CO groups of rhodizonic acid (cyclo-C6(O)4(OH)2) into Mn[BOND]O bonds. The acid is subsequently degraded to oxalate (C atoms white), which remains in the cavity (the eight terminal CH3 groups are not shown).

    20. Reductive Oligomerization of 1,2-Di-tert-butyl-1,1,2,2-tetrachlorodisilane: The Tricyclo[2.2.0.02,5]hexasilane and Tetracyclo[3.3.0.02,7.03,6]octasilane Systems (pages 1725–1727)

      Dr. Yoshio Kabe, Mutsumi Kuroda, Dr. Yoshihiro Honda, Dr. Osamu Yamashita, Dr. Takeshi Kawase and Prof. Dr. Satoru Masamune

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817251

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly strained polycyclic silanes such as the tetracyclooctasilane derivative 1 were obtained in a unique and somewhat unexpected way. Besides 1, mono- and tricyclic compounds were formed, but no compounds with cubane or prismane skeleton. To all appearances the carbon analogue of 1 still does not exist.

    21. 29Si-29Si Long Range Couplings in Strained Cyclic Polysilanes (pages 1727–1730)

      Mutsumi Kuroda, Dr. Yoshio Kabe, Dr. Masayuki Hashimoto and Prof. Dr. Satoru Masamune

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817271

      Unusually large coupling constants nJ(29Si,29Si) can occur in polycyclosilanes highly strained cyclic polysilanes, e.g. in the title compounds of the above communication. 2J can even be larger than 1J! On reducing the ring size of monocyclosilanes (from six to three) 1J becomes smaller and 2J larger, as is also the case with the 13C-13C coupling constants of analogous carbocycles; in the case of cyclic polysilanes, however, 1J and 3J or 4J can have the same order of magnitude.

    22. Linkage of Alkylidyne, Carbonyl, and Alkyne Ligands at a Tungsten Center to Form a Metallacyclopentadienone and an η3-Oxocyclobutenyl Complex (pages 1730–1731)

      Prof. Andreas Mayr, Ken S. Lee and Bart Kahr

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817301

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The conversion of alkylidyne into alkylidene complexes, which is of interest in connection with the catalysis of acetylene polymerization, is demonstrated by the reaction of 1 with PhC[TRIPLE BOND]CH. The localized double bonds in 2 lend support to this complex being regarded as an alkylidene complex. The complex 3, which is isomeric with 2 and obtained likewise, is not formed from the five-membered ring of 2 by reductive elimination of the tungsten center but via an independent route.

    23. Structure, Magnetochemistry and Biological Relevance of [Mn4O3Cl4(OAc)3(py)3], a Complex with S = 9/2 Ground State (pages 1731–1733)

      Qiaoying Li, John B. Vincent, Eduardo Libby, Hsiu-Rong Chang, Dr. John C. Huffman, Dr. Peter D. W. Boyd, Prof. Dr. George Christou and Prof. Dr. David N. Hendrickson

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817311

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The title compound 1 is a model for the Mnmath imageMnIV center near the photosystem II. It follows from the dependence of the susceptibility of 1 on temperature and field strength that its magnetic properties are determined both by ferromagnetic as well as antiferromagnetic interactions and that the ground state has a spin of 9/2. The first excited states should be more than 200 cm−1 energy-richer than the ground state.

    24. Chlorotetain from Bacillus subtilis, an Antifungal Dipeptide with an Unusual Chlorine-containing Amino Acid (pages 1733–1734)

      Dipl.-Chem. Claudius Rapp, Prof. Dr. Günther Jung, Dipl.-Biol. Werner Katzer and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Loeffler

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817331

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      A chlorocyclohexenone system as substituent in the side chain characterizes the antifungal dipeptide 1 (Ala-CCAla). Due to this reactive substituent CCAla is degraded to L-tyrosine upon acid hydrolysis of 1. This property could also render the chemical synthesis of CCAlA difficult.

    25. Oxidative Addition of Water to the RuII Catalyst K[RuII(Hedta)(CO)]: Homogeneous Catalysis of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction under Ambient Conditions (pages 1735–1736)

      Prof. Mirza M. Taqui Khan, Dr. Shivappa B. Halligudi and Sumita Shukla

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817351

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      A 75% CO conversion is obtained after four hours at 20 °C and 1 atm CO for the water-gas reaction when the RuII complex 1 is used as homogeneous catalyst. The optimum reaction conditions were found to be 50 °C and 15 atm CO; the turnover number is then 350 mol CO2/H2 per mole of catalyst per hour. 1 is by far the most effective homogeneous catalyst for the water-gas reaction; the heterogeneously catalyzed reaction is usually carried out at 400–460°C and 200 atm CO.

  3. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Conference Calendar
    10. Author Index
    11. Subject Index
  4. Editorial Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Conference Calendar
    10. Author Index
    11. Subject Index
    1. Chemistry of Materials (pages 1741–1743)

      Prof. Dr. Leonard V. Interrante

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817411

  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Conference Calendar
    10. Author Index
    11. Subject Index
    1. New Organic Superconductors (pages 1747–1751)

      Prof. Dr. Hiroo Inokuchi

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817471

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Conference Calendar
    10. Author Index
    11. Subject Index
  7. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Conference Calendar
    10. Author Index
    11. Subject Index
    1. Advanced Materials—R & D Efforts in Germany (pages 1754–1756)

      Wolfgang Faul

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817541

    2. Speciality Polymer (pages 1757–1758)

      Wolfgang H. Meyer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817571

  8. Conference Calendar

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Conference Calendar
    10. Author Index
    11. Subject Index
    1. Conference Calender (pages 1759–1764)

      Wolfgang H. Meyer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817591

  9. Author Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Conference Calendar
    10. Author Index
    11. Subject Index
    1. Author Index (pages 1765–1770)

      Wolfgang H. Meyer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817651

  10. Subject Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Conference Calendar
    10. Author Index
    11. Subject Index
    1. Subject Index (pages 1771–1785)

      Wolfgang H. Meyer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198817711

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