Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 28 Issue 1

January 1989

Volume 28, Issue 1

Pages 1–134

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 1/1989)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the structure of hexa[bis(trimethylsilyl)methyl]hexagermaprismane. The synthesis of this first hexagermaprismane was an outcome of the search for polyhedranes with skeletal frameworks of heavy main-group elements. Further surprises can also be expected in the near future in this branch of inorganic chemistry, which has been fluorishing for some years now. In the molecule illustrated, which has D3h symmetry, all the Ge-Ge bonds are much longer than those in other polygermanes. A further surprising feature is that—other than in the carbon analogues—the bonds in the triangular units are longer than in the rectangular units. Further details of this chemical filigree are reported by H. Sakurai et al. on p. 55f.

    2. Graphical Abstract (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 1/1989)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900012

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Advanced Materials
    6. Notice to Authors
    7. Reviews
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Chemical Aspects of Fusion Technology (pages 1–20)

      Prof. Dr. Hans J. Ache

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An important factor in the development of a fusion reactor is the minimization of the loss of tritium in the fuel cycle which is necessary for the fusion [reaction (a)] and can be generated from 7Li with the neutrons formed thereby according to reaction (b). The present review article describes the measures that have been taken to solve this and a series of other chemical problems encountered in fusion technology.

    2. Main-Chain Chirality and Optical Activity in Polymers Consisting of C[BOND]C Chains (pages 21–37)

      Prof. Dr. Günter Wulff

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900211

      Main-chain chirality is the chirality of a polymer resulting alone from the configurational or conformational arrangement in the main chain. Systematic symmetry considerations have led to a surprising result: Even in polymers derived from 1-substituted or nonsymmetric 1,1-disubstituted olefins—the technologically most important polymers—several types of chiral structures exist which are expected to result in optical activity if a particular enantiomer is favorably formed. By carrying out an asymmetric copolymerization it has been possible to obtain certain structural types in the form of optically active copolymers or homopolymers (e.g., copolymers of styrenemethyl methacrylate or even the homopolymer of polystyrene).

    3. Intramolecular, Stoichiometric (Li, Mg, Zn) and Catalytic (Ni, Pd, Pt) Metallo-Ene Reactions in Organic Synthesis [New Synthetic Methods (75)] (pages 38–52)

      Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Oppolzer

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900381

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hardly recognized until a few years ago, intramolecular variants of metalloene reactions have recently developed in a most impressive way. The two possible types of reaction are outlined below. The enophile is bound either to the terminal or the central C atom of the metallo-ene. The strategic employment of stereoselective magnesium-ene cyclizations has enabled the productive synthesis of numerous structurally diverse natural products (e.g. sesquiterpenes, alkaloids, olfactory substances, insect defense compounds, fungitoxins). A brilliant example is the synthesis of the elusive odorant (+) Khusiomone which outshines 20 years of work in the field of tricyclovetivane synthesis.

  2. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Advanced Materials
    6. Notice to Authors
    7. Reviews
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. A Stable Amino-Substituted Phosphaalkyne (pages 53–54)

      Prof. Dr. Rolf Appel and Michael Poppe

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900531

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Phosphaalkyne chemistry is thriving!N-isopropyl-N-trimethylsilylaminophosphaethyne 2 is the first amino-substituted phosphaalkyne stable at room temperature. It can be prepared by reaction of tris(trimethylsilyl)phosphane with isopropyl isocyanate—formation of 1a,b—and subsequent cleavage of hexamethyldisiloxane. Its structure is confirmed by NMR and IR spectroscopy and a Diels–Alder reaction.

    2. Synthesis of the Novel Ring Systems 1,2,3,4-Oxazadisiletidine and 1,3,4,2,5-Dioxazadisilolidine (pages 54–55)

      Dr. Gregory R. Gillette, Dr. Jim Maxka and Prof. Dr. Robert West

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900541

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The constitution of the two new heterocycles 2 and 3 could be elucidated by INEPT-INADEQUATE 29Si-NMR spectroscopy. 2 is formed by [2 + 2] cycloaddition of nitrosobenzene to tetramesityldisilene 1, while 3 is formed by reaction of nitrobenzene with 1.

    3. [(Me3Si)2CHGe]6, the First Hexagermaprismane (pages 55–56)

      Dr. Akira Sekiguchi, Dr. Chizuko Kabuto and Prof. Dr. Hideki Sakurai

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900551

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The first Ge6 prismane 2, which could be prepared in 12% yield as orange-yellow crystals by reduction of the germanium trichloride 1 with lithium powder [Eqn. (a)], has proved to be unexpectedly stable towards atmospheric oxygen, moisture, although it partially decomposes upon heating to 200°C.

    4. K4P3, a Compound Containing the Radical Anion Pmath image (pages 56–58)

      Prof. Dr. Hans Georg von Schnering, Dr. Martin Hartweg, Dips.-Chem. Ute Hartweg and Dr. Wolfgang Hönle

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900561

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The polyanion Pmath image in K4P3 is isoelectronic and isostructural with Omath image and ClO2; it is a radical anion with 19 valence electrons. The magnetism indicates presence of a system with three unpaired electrons. K4P3 is obtained in the form of bluish-black platelets having a metallic luster, which decompose explosively on rubbing. The structure of K4P3 is characterized by angular P3 chains and condensed trigonal K prisms (see figure on the right).

    5. NaxMg5−xGa9, a New Intermetallic Phase as a Link Between Zintl Phases and Metals (pages 58–59)

      Dr. Reinhard Nesper

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900581

      NaxMg5−xGa9 crystallizes in a new structure type in which the Ga atoms form a three-dimensional framework of linked icosahedra and Friauf polyhedra. These two types of polyhedra are typical for intermetallic phases. The compound shows a considerable phase width. The structure determination gives indications that, despite the metallic properties, variable electron numbers cause local changes of the chemical bonding which only take place at a single terminally bound Ga atom.

    6. Enantioselective Reduction of α,β-Unsaturated Carboxylates with NaBH4 and Catalytic Amounts of Chiral Cobalt Semicorrin Complexes (pages 60–61)

      Urs Leutenegger, Andrew Madin and Priv.-Doz. Dr. Andreas Pfaltz

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900601

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High enantioselectivities (up to 96% ee), almost quantitative chemical yields, and mild reaction conditions characterize the title reaction. It is suitable, for example, for the synthesis of isoprenoid chains as occur in the vitamins E and K1. An example is reaction (a), R [DOUBLE BOND] CH2OSiMe2tBu.

    7. Nickel Complexes Containing Sterically Demanding Thiolate Ligands: [Ni8S(SC4H9)9], a Mixed-Valence Nickel Sulfide Thiolate Cluster, and [Ni4(SC3H7)8], a Homoleptic Nickel Thiolate (pages 61–62)

      Dipl.-Chem. Thomas Krüger, Prof. Dr. Bernt Krebs and Prof. Dr. Gerald Henkel

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900611

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A sulfide ion at the center of an Ni6 prism capped by two additional Ni atoms, and the presence of nine μ2-StBu bridges are the characteristic features of the structure of 1. The mean oxidation state for nickel in diamagnetic 1 is + 1.25. The anion 1 is the first pure nickel–sulfur complex with nickel in an unusual oxidation state. With the sterically less demanding thiolato ligand iPrS, on the other hand, the neutral complex 2 containing Ni2⊕ is formed.

    8. Heterogeneous, Metathesis-active Schrock-type Carbene Complexes by Reaction of Carbyne Tungsten(VI) Complexes with Silica Gel (pages 62–64)

      Dr. Karin Weiss and Georg Lössel

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900621

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reaction of the surface SiOH groups of silica gel with [L3W[TRIPLE BOND]CtBu], L [DOUBLE BOND] tBuO, Cl, tBuCH2, at room temperature affords storable heterogeneous metathesis catalysts which can be used above 100°C. Reaction of the carbyne complex with the reduced Phillips catalyst does not yield any particularly metathesis-active products. The picture on the right shows concepts of the mechanism of the catalyst synthesis.

    9. A trans-Dimethyl Derivative of Octahedral TiIV: Alkylation and Arylation of TiIV-Schiff Base Complexes (pages 64–66)

      Prof. Dr. Carlo Floriani, Dr. Euro Solari, Dr. Fabio Corazza, Prof. Dr. Angiola Chiesi-Villa and Prof. Dr. Carlo Guastini

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900641

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The TiIV-complex [(Ti(salen)Cl2] 1 can be attacked by nucleophiles at both the ligand as well as at the central atom. For example, depending on the reagent and conditions, the organotitanium compounds 24 are formed (salen [DOUBLE BOND] N,N′-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato)).

    10. A Sensitive Spectroscopic Probe for Monitoring Changes in the Coordination Sphere of Titanium: Eight-Membered Dioxatitanacycles and Their Organometallic Derivatives (pages 66–67)

      Prof. Dr. Carlo Floriani, Dr. Fabio Corazza, Dipl.-Chem. William Lesueur, Prof. Dr. Angiola Chiesi-Villa and Prof. Dr. Carlo Guastini

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900661

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In view of the considerable importance of titanium compounds in organic synthesis model studies are especially advantageous. TiCl4 reacts with MBPH2 with evolution of HCl to give [(mbp)TiCl2], an eight-membered heterocycle containing an O[BOND]Ti[BOND]O unit and oppositely disposed CH2 groups. Its 1 H NMR signals respond sensitively to changes at the Ti atom which are caused, e.g., by alkylations and arylations and by increasing the coordination number.

    11. 3-Arylsulfonyloxazolidines as Chiral Templates; Asymmetric Synthesis of 2-Substituted 2-Hydroxycyclohexanecarbaldehydes from 2-Hydroxymethylenecyclohexanone (pages 67–69)

      Dr. Inga Hoppe, Prof. Dr. Dieter Hoppe, Dr. Christian Wolff, Prof. Dr. Ernst Egert and Regine Herbst

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900671

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two new stereogenic centers are formed upon condensation of the sulfamide 1 with the enol 2 to give the oxazolidine 3, which, in turn, adds carbanion derivatives MNu with high diastereofacial selectivity to give 4. Cleavage of the chiral auxiliary with 1,3-propanedithiol leads to diastereo- and enantiomerically pure aldehyde derivatives 5. All steps proceed practically stereo specifically.

    12. Asymmetric Homoaldol Reaction by Enantioselective Lithiation of a Prochiral 2-Butenyl Carbamate (pages 69–71)

      Prof. Dr. Dieter Hoppe and Dipl.-Chem. Oliver Zschage

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900691

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A second-order asymmetric conversion of the configurationally labile racemic lithium complex 2 initially formed from 1 enables the recovery of crystalline (R)-2.sparteine. This, and the transmetalation of (R)-2.sparteine (as solid) to the configurationally stable titanium derivative are decisive for the title reaction. (R)-2 is not only of interest as chiral homoenolate, but also as antiselective propanal enolate equivalent that adds with good reagent-controlled stereoselectivity; an example is the reaction leading to 3.

    13. Retention of Configuration in the Non-Darwinian Evolution of Cytochrome c (pages 71–72)

      Prof. Dr. Shosuke Kojo, Prof. Dr. Koushi Fukunishi and Prof. Dr. Ikuyo Tsukamoto

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900711

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Neutral (non-Darwinian) evolution also has certain requirements to fulfill. This is demonstrated by the fact that 1, the prosthetic group of eukaryotic cytochrome c, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tuna, chicken, and horse is always the same of the four possible diastereomers. This explains the necessary retention of molecular properties so that, for example, two cytochromes c differing in 45 of 110 amino acid residues can exhibit very similar reaction mechanisms.

    14. Model of a Solvent-Shared Ion Pair with N[BOND]H ⃛C Hydrogen Bonds between Amine and Carbanion—Crystal Structure of [Fluorenyllithium·2 Ethylenediamine] (pages 72–73)

      Dipl.-Chem. Stefan Buchholz, Dr. Klaus Harms, Michael Marsch, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Werner Massa and Prof. Dr. Gernot Boche

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900721

      Whereas organolithium compounds normally crystallize as contact ion pairs, in [fluorenyllithium·2 ethylenediamine] the cation and the anion are separated by solvent molecules. Especially noteworthy is the X-ray crystallographic detection of N[BOND]H ⃛C hydrogen bonds to a “naked” Carbanion. Since anion and cation interact with the same solvent molecules the solid-state structure of the title compound can serve as model for a solvent-shared ion pair.

    15. Hydrogen Bonds between an NHmath image Ion and a Carbanion—Crystal Structure of Ammonium 1,2,4-Tricyanocyclopentadienide (pages 73–75)

      Dipl.-Chem. Stefan Buchholz, Dr. Klaus Harms, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Werner Massa and Prof. Dr. Gernot Boche

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900731

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The H3N[BOND]H ⃛C hydrogen bond found for the first time in the crystalline state is consistent with concepts developed by Cram for the mechanism of the D/H exchange which proceeds with unusually high retention (kA/krac = 148) on reaction of a fluorenyl derivative with NH3. Each nitrile N atom of the title compound is bound via an H bond to an NHmath image ion, and each NHmath image ion forms three H bonds to nitrile N atoms and one hydrogen bond to a cyclopentadienide C atom. The picture on the right shows a section of the crystal structure (

      in hydrogen bond).

    16. A New Oxygen Sensor Based on the Thermoelectric Power of Solid Solutions of Nb2O5 and Bi2O3 (pages 75–76)

      A. V. Chadwick, W. Zhou and Prof. Dr. J. M. Thomas

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900751

      One part of Nb2O5 to 60 parts of Bi2O3 suffices in order to achieve a reaction of Bi2O3 of thermopower Θ sensitive to a change of oxygen pressure. The β-phase of the solid solution of Nb2O5 in Bi2O3, which is stable below 900 K, is a promising material for oxygen sensors which operate without the necessity of an oxygen reference pressure at relatively low temperatures. The reason for the rapid and reversible change of thermopower as a function of oxygen partial pressure is still unknown.

    17. Investigation of the Tautomerism of 15N-Labeled Hydroporphyrins by Dynamic NMR Spectroscopy (pages 76–79)

      Dipl.-Chem. Martin Schlabach, Dr. Helmut Rumpel and Prof. Dr. Hans-Heinrich Limbach

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900761

      The barrier height for tautomerism of the inner protons of porphyrin is significantly influenced by specific reduction of the pyrrole rings. In the tetraphenyl derivatives of chlorin and bacteriochlorin an aromatic ring current was established 1H NMR spectroscopically; in contrast, in the tetraphenyl derivative of isobacteriochlorin it is virtually absent. The activation barrier in the hydrogenation of a pyrrole ring is ca. 20 kJ mol −1 higher. In the hydrogenation of two adjacent rings a system is formed in which two symmetric double minimum potentials of differing barrier height have been demonstrated for the first time for an intramolecular proton transfer.

    18. Selective Molecular Recognition of Trihydroxybenzenes (pages 79–81)

      Dipl.-Chem. Frank Ebmeyer and Prof. Dr. Fritz Vögtle

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900791

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The host compound 1 with a conical cavity binds, like two related hosts, trihydroxybenzenes, which are thereby noticeably stabilized towards oxidation. The results suggest multiple hydrogen bonding between host and guest in the cavity.

    19. A Silicogermanate with a Si : Ge Ratio ≥ 2—an MFI Zeolite of Novel Composition (pages 81–83)

      Dr. Zelimir Gabelica and Dr. Jean-Louis Guth

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900811

      A pure Ge-MFI zeolite is expected to be difficult to synthesize. This is the conclusion drawn from a study on the possibilities and effects of Si/Ge exchange in Si-MFI zeolites. When for example, the mixture GeCl4[BOND]SiO2[BOND]HF0.5 Pr4NBr[BOND]8 CH3NH2[BOND]35 H2O is heated to 180°C for 15 h there results a solid with MFI structure, which, after calcination, has the composition Si63Ge33O192. The unusually high Ge content surpasses all previously observed degrees of substitution in MFI zeolites.

    20. Stable Open-Chain 1,3-Dilithium Compounds by Reaction of Methylenecyclopropanes with Lithium Powder: 2,4-Dilithio-1-butenes (pages 83–84)

      Prof. Dr. Adalbert Maercker and Dipl.-Chem. Klaus-Dieter Klein

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900831

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Even at room temperature 1 reacts smoothly with lithium powder with cleavage of a σ-bond to give the extraordinarily stable 2,4-dilithio-l-butene 2. In contrast to 1,3-dilithiopropane, 2 does not split off lithium hydride, so that it could be thoroughly investigated NMR spectroscopically and, inter alia, could be allowed to react in two steps with Me2S2 and Me3SiCl to give 3.

    21. Structures of Quino[7,8-h]quinoline and Quino[8,7-h]quinoline (pages 84–86)

      Claus Krieger, Dr. Ian Newsom, Dipl.-Chem. Michael A. Zirnstein and Prof. Dr. Heinz A. Staab

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900841

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The two title compounds 1 and 2 are almost planar in the crystalline state. The decades-old uncertainties concerning the synthesis and structural assignment have now been resolved by X-ray structure analyses of the two compounds. A striking feature in the case of the extremely strongly and also kinetically active base 1 is the large central external angle of the “naphthalene unit” (125.4°), which results in a relatively large N ⃛N distance of 272.8 pm.

    22. Benzo[1,2-h:4,3-h′]diquinoline (“1,14-Diaza[5]helicene”): Synthesis, Structure, and Properties (pages 86–88)

      Prof. Dr. Heinz A. Staab, Dipl.-Chem. Michael A. Zirnstein and Claus Krieger

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900861

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Despite almost equal N ⃛N distances in 1 and 2 (272.8 and 270.5 pm) the basicity constant of 2 is almost two powers of ten smaller than that of 1. The reason for this could be the helical structure of 2, which almost removes the destabilizing “lone-pair” interaction of the N atoms in the case of the free base and hinders an N ⃛H ⃛N bridge along the preferred directions of the “lone pairs” of the N atoms in the case of 2a.

    23. Methylboron Oxide, H3C[BOND]B[TRIPLE BOND]O (pages 88–90)

      Prof. Dr. Hans Bock, Prof. Dr. Lorenz Cederbaum, Prof. Dr. W. von Niessen, Prof. Dr. Peter Paetzold, Dr. Pavel Rosmus and Dr. Bahman Solouki

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900881

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The title compound can be regarded as an analogue of acetonitrile. It was generated by energetically favorable CO- and CO2-elimination from 2-methyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolane-4,5-dione 1. The CBO skeleton is linear, and a BO triple bond is present. According to the findings of this study, it should be possible to isolate R3C[BOND]B[TRIPLE BOND]O compounds with bulky alkyl or aryl residues.

    24. The Structure of Hexaaminobenzene (pages 90–92)

      Dr. David A. Dixon, Dr. Joseph C. Calabrese and Dr. Joel S. Miller

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900901

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An S6-symmetry is obtained for the structure of lowest energy on comparing the X-ray structure and IR spectroscopic data of 1 with theoretical values. Thus, 1 fulfills an important condition for compounds which, as radical ions, exhibit a ferromagnetism that can only be attributed to electrons in p-orbitals. Such compounds must be so symmetrical that their HOMO is degenerate, i.e. they must have D2d symmetry or a threefold or greater axis of rotation.

    25. The Structure of the Tetracation of Hexaazaoctadecahydrocoronene, A Simple Substituted Benzene (pages 92–94)

      Dr. David A. Dixon, Dr. Joseph C. Calabrese, Dr. Richard L. Harlow and Dr. Joel S. Miller

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900921

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The aromaticity of the benzene nucleus is essentially retained when 1 is oxidized to 14⊕. This was revealed by comparison of experimental and calculated structural parameters, which are best in agreement with the resonance structure shown on the right for 14⊕. The triplet ground state which, in principle, is conceivable for 14⊕ was, however not found.

    26. From Tetraspiranes to Bispropellanes (pages 94–95)

      Prof. Dr. Lutz Fitjer and Dipl.-Chem. Ulrike Quabeck

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900941

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Eightfold 1,2 shifts enable formation of the bispropellanes 2 from the functionalized tetraspiranes 1. The acid-induced rearrangements were based on the findings of force-field calculations (R [DOUBLE BOND] H, CH3).

    27. Disilene versus Silanediyl (“Silylene”) Additions to CN and NCO Bonds (pages 95–97)

      Prof. Dr. Manfred Weidenbruch, Bolko Flintjer, Prof. Dr. Siegfried Pohl and Dipl.-Chem. Wolfgang Saak

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900951

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The first [2 + 2]-cycloaddition to a CN triple bond has been observed in the reaction of tetra-tent-butyldisilene with tBu3SiCN to give 1. In contrast, the analogous reaction with the isocyanate tBu3SiNCO leads with rearrangement to the five-membered ring compound 2. Both heterocycles have been characterized by X-ray structure analyses.

    28. Thiosulfinic Acids: a New Class of Chiral Organosulfur Compounds (pages 97–98)

      Prof. Dr. Marian Mikołajczyk, Piotr Łyżwa, Dr. Józef Drabowicz, Dr. Michał Wieczorek and Grzegorz Bujacz

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900971

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The thiosulfinates 2 are relatively stable; they are accessible by reaction of the sulfinic acid chlorides 1 with H2S and alkylamines. The pseudotetrahedral coordination of the central sulfur atom necessary for a chirality of 2 could be confirmed by an X-ray structure analysis of the salt with R = adamantyl and the (S)-benzylthiuronium ion as cation. Inter alia, the thiosulfinates 3 (R = tBu, adamantyl, triptycenyl) could be prepared from 2.

    29. Self-Reduction of [Ph4P][Nb(SCH2CH2CH2S)3] with Formation of a Nbmath image Complex (pages 98–100)

      Dr. Kazuyuki Tatsumi, Yoitsu Sekiguchi, Michiyo Sebata, Prof. Dr. Akira Nakamura, Prof. Dr. Roger E. Cramer and Thomas Chung

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198900981

      The size of the chelate ring determines the reactivity of Nbv complexes: Whereas [Ph4P][Nb(SCH2CH2S)3] is completely stable in acetonitrile, in the case of the homologous title complex a reductive dimerization takes place. The anion 1 formed initially reacts further with methanol to give 2, which was isolated as the Ph4P-salt; the structure of this anion is shown on the right.

      • equation image
  3. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Advanced Materials
    6. Notice to Authors
    7. Reviews
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Book Review: Organometallic Chemistry. An Overview. By J. S. Thayer (pages 100–101)

      Pierre Braunstein

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198901001

    2. Book Review: Architecture of Eukaryotic Genes. Edited by G. Kahl (page 104)

      Wolfgang Hillen

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198901041

  4. Advanced Materials

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Advanced Materials
    6. Notice to Authors
    7. Reviews
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. You have free access to this content
      Paving the Way … (pages 107–108)

      Peter Gölitz

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198901071

  5. Notice to Authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Advanced Materials
    6. Notice to Authors
    7. Reviews
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Notice to Authors (pages 109–110)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198901091

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Advanced Materials
    6. Notice to Authors
    7. Reviews
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Advanced Ceramics for Biomedical Applications (pages 111–116)

      Prof. Dr. Günther Heimke

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198901111

    2. Surface Chemistry with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope (pages 117–122)

      Dr. Jürgen P. Rabe

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198901171

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Advanced Materials
    6. Notice to Authors
    7. Reviews
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Aluminum-rich Metallic Glasses (pages 123–124)

      Robert W. Cahn

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198901231

  8. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Advanced Materials
    6. Notice to Authors
    7. Reviews
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. High-Temperature Superconductors in Strasburg … (pages 124–125)

      Herbert Jaeger

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198901241

    2. …and Colorado Springs (pages 125–128)

      Herbert Jaeger

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198901251

  9. Conference Calendar

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Advanced Materials
    6. Notice to Authors
    7. Reviews
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Conference Calendar (pages 129–134)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198901291

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION