Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 28 Issue 10

October 1989

Volume 28, Issue 10

Pages 1283–1444

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 10/1989)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198912831

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a computer-generated space-filling model (D. Williams) of the structure of a highly ordered [2] catenane. This compound could be prepared in a one-pot synthesis in a yield of 70% (for comparison, use of the high-dilution technique generally affords yields of around 1%). The initially formed decaoxa[13.13]paracyclophane (drawn in red) acts as a template for generation of cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (drawn in blue) in such a way that, after cyclization, the two ring systems are interlocked. This synthetic principle, involving the exploitation of supramolecular structures, should prove to be very useful. Further details on this [2]catenane, its molecular structure, its dynamic behavior in solution, and its electrochemical properties are reported by J. F. Stoddart et al. on page 1396.

    2. Graphical Abstract (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 10/1989)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198912832

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Materials Forum
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Catalytic Antibodies (pages 1283–1295)

      Prof. Peter G. Schultz

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198912833

      The seemingly infinite binding repertoire of the immune system can be exploited to generate tailored antibodies. Catalytically active antibodies can be used to carry out a wide variety of reactions in a specific fashion. Examples include the hydrolysis of carbonates, esters, and amides, Claisen rearrangements, and transacylations. Furthermore, generation and characterization of these novel catalysts should lead to new insights into the nature of molecular recognition and catalysis.

    2. Metal Complexes of Small Cycloalkynes and Arynes (pages 1296–1320)

      Dr. Martin A. Bennett and Dr. Heinz P. Schwemlein

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198912961

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The chemistry of the title compounds contrasts sharply with that of free hydrocarbops. Some of these metal complexes are very promising reagents for organic chemistry. Prime examples are the aryne–zirconocene complexes, readily accessible from aromatic monohalides. Trapping reactions of 1 afford zirconacycles, which may be transformed, for example, into aromatic ketones, o-iodophenylketones, isothiazoles, and dihydrocyclobutabenzenes (cf. 25).

    3. Organic Dications: Gas Phase Experiments and Theory in Concert (pages 1321–1341)

      Prof. Koop Lammertsma, Prof. Paul von Ragué Schleyer and Prof. Helmut Schwarz

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913211

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Much information on the bonding in electrondeficient molecules may be obtained from experimental and theoretical studies of small organic dications. For example, the structure of CHmath image (1) is best described as a complex, CHmath image, with H2 bonded in a side-on fashion to an empty p orbital of CHmath image. This description of (radical) dications as complexes of smaller dications and neutral molecules has also proved useful for larger ions.

  2. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Materials Forum
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Metal-Induced Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Sulfur Monoxide and Sulfur (pages 1342–1343)

      Dipl.-Chem. Armin Neher and Prof. Dr. Ingo-Peter Lorenz

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913421

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reductions of SO2 mediated by transition metals are highly interesting as models for removal of sulfur from flue gas. The deoxygenation of free SO2 to complex-bound SO and S has now been achieved for the first time by reaction of SO2 with the tetrahydrido complex 1 (cf. 2, 3). Treatment of 3 with HCl liberates H2S and results in formation of 4, which may be easily transformed back into 1.

    2. From the Bicyclo[3.3.0]octane Framework to Multiply Bridged [12]Annulenes and Semibulvanes (pages 1343–1345)

      Dr. Harald Kohnz, Dipl.-Chem. Bernhard Düll and Prof. Dr. Klaus Müllen

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913431

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The title compounds 2 and 3 are of great importance in terms of bonding theory. They were synthesized from the readily accessible precursor 1. The 4nπ species 2 allows comparison of its bonding with that in analogous [14]-, [16]-, and [18]annulenes. Compound 3 is the first doubly bridged semibullvalene; the degenerate Cope rearrangement is accelerated by the bridges (E [DOUBLE BOND] CO2Et).

    3. Azaoctabisvalenes (pages 1345–1348)

      Dipl.-Chem. Björn Trupp, Prof. Dr. Hans Fritz and Prof. Dr. Horst Prinzbach

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913451

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two new and highly strained azapolycycles, stable to above 100 °C, are accessible by efficient syntheses.Z-Diazaoctabisvalene 1 and (7-substituted) azaoctabisvalene 2 react with nucleophiles such as H2O, and H2S, and RNH2, the C[BOND]N (C[BOND]C) (aza)bicyclobutane bonds being cleaved.

    4. Stabilized cis-Tris-σ-homobenzenes: Syntheses, [σ2 + σ2 + σ2] Cycloreversions (pages 1348–1350)

      Dipl.-Chem. Wolf Dieter Braschwitz, Dipl.-Chem. Thomas Otten, Dr. Christoph Rücker, Prof. Dr. Hans Fritz and Prof. Dr. Horst Prinzbach

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913481

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gram quantities of 3, 6, 9-trisubstituted trishomobenzenes 2, R [DOUBLE BOND] CO2CH3, CN, etc., are accessible by successive assembly of

      units, starting with trioxide 1. A [σ2 + σ2 + σ2] cycloreversion of 2 leads to clean formation of the 1, 4, 7-trisubstituted cis, cis, cis-cyclononatrienes 3.

    5. Bridged cis-Tris-σ-homobenzenes: Heterodiademanes (pages 1351–1353)

      Dr. Dirk-Rainer Handreck, Dr. Dieter Hunkler and Prof. Dr. Horst Prinzbach

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913511

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The flexible reaction sequence leading from cyclooctatetraene to azadiademane 1 takes repeated advantage of typical “cage effects”. The thermal stability of compound 1, R1 [DOUBLE BOND] SiMe3, R2 [DOUBLE BOND] OMe, is unusually high. A cycloreversion, as is found for C analogues, was not observed.

    6. Diels–Alder Adducts on the b Side of Naphthalene: Rapid Cycloreversion of o-Quinodimethanes (pages 1353–1355)

      Prof. Dr. Wolfram Grimme, Peter Höner, Dr. Heinz Theo Kämmerling, Dr. Robert Waldraff and Prof. Dr. Jakob Wirz

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913531

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cycloreversion of the naphthalene adduct 1 is extremely fast, since, in contrast to reaction of adducts of type 2, the full resonance energy is released. The most unstable alicyclic Diels–Alder adduct of type 1 is the benzene derivative, compound 3, for which the free energy of cycloreversion is only 12.2 kcal mol−1. The corresponding gain in resonance energy is 50.5 kcal mol−1. The thermally and photochemically accessible adducts 1 can be trapped by Diels–Alder reactions owing to their o-quinodimethane structural elements.

    7. Tetraphosphacyclobutadiene as Complex Ligand (pages 1355–1357)

      Prof. Dr. Otto J. Scherer, Dipl.-Chem. Jürgen Vondung and Dr. Gotthelf Wolmershäuser

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913551

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The phosphorus analogue of cyclobutadiene, cyclo-P4, can be stabilized as a ligand in the slightly distorted P4Nb pyramid of 1. The photochemical synthesis of 1 was achieved under very mild conditions starting from [Cp*Nb(CO)4] and white phosphorus. The likewise prepared triple-decker complex 2, containing a cyclo-P6 middle “deck”, displays a μ, η3, η3 distortion of the cyclo-P6 ligands as observed for the η5-C5Me4Et analogue.

    8. Aurophilicity as Concerted Effect: Relativistic MO Calculations on Carbon-Centered Gold Clusters (pages 1357–1359)

      Prof. Dr. Notker Rösch, Dipl.-Chem. Andreas Görling, Prof. Donald E. Ellis and Prof. Dr. Hubert Schmidbaur

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913571

      Three features must be taken into consideration in discussing the bonding in carbon-centered gold clusters: the tangential Au[BOND]Au bonds, the radial bonds between Au and the central atom as well as between Au and the outer ligands, and the preference for 6s-5d over 6s-6p hybridization. Nonrelativistic and relativistic MO calculations revealed that the formally closed d10 shell of the Au ions in the cluster [(LAu)6C]2⊕ is increasingly disrupted by interaction with the other Au centers, the central atom, and the ligands L, thereby increasing the probability of Au[BOND]Au interactions.

    9. Synthesis and Pharmacological Properties of a Novel Cardioactive Steroid (pages 1359–1361)

      Dr. Ulrich Werner, Dipl.-Chem. Uwe Möller, Dipl.-Chem. Petra Wagner, Prof. Dr. Peter Welzel, Dipl.-Biol. Christa Zylka, Dr. Siegfried Mechmann, Dr. Hermann Pusch and Prof. Dr. Helfried Günther Glitsch

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913591

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      How do cardioactive steroid lactones exert their effects? It is known that they inhibit Na/K ATPase, an enzyme that serves in the active transport of Na and K across the plasma membrane. To determine where the steroid lactones bind on the enzyme, a flexible synthetic route to compounds of type 1 was developed. The goal was to obtain substances containing a reactive R group. The parent compound 1, R [DOUBLE BOND] H, inhibits the Na/K ATPase and exerts a positive inotropic effect.

    10. Complexes with an η22-SiO Bridge. Structure of the Bimetallic Complex (pages 1361–1363)

      Dr. Pierre Braunstein, Dr. Michael Knorr, Prof. Antonio Tiripicchio and Prof. Marisa Tiripicchio Camellini

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913611

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An MM′SiO four-membered ring characterizes complexes 1 and 2. The novel η22-SiO bridge of 1 is “hemilabile” in solution (only one OMe 1H NMR signal), whereas it is stable for 2. These findings could contribute to a better understanding of coordinatively unsaturated, catalytically active multinuclear complexes on supports such as SiO2 (

      [DOUBLE BOND]Ph2PCH2PPh2).

    11. Two Novel Polyoxomolybdates Containing the (MoNO)3⊕ Unit: [Mo5Na(NO)O13(OCH3)4]2⊖ and [Mo6(NO)O18]3⊖ (pages 1363–1364)

      Dr. Pierre Gouzerh, Prof. Dr. Yves Jeannin, Anna Proust and Francis Robert

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913631

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The first polyoxomolybdates with an MoIINO instead of an MoIV O group are compounds 2 and 3. They were obtained by reductive nitrosylation of complex 1 with hydroxylamine in methanol. Pentamolybdate 2 is transformed into hexamolybdate 3 upon dissolution, for example in CH2Cl2. The structures of both title compounds are derived from the Lindgvist structure [Mo6O19]2⊖.

    12. HoAl3Cl12 in Crystalline Form (pages 1364–1365)

      Dipl.-Chem. Dietmar Hake and Prof. Dr. Werner Urland

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913641

      The chemical transport of lanthanoid halides via the gas phase is possible, for example, with A1Cl3. Spectroscopic investigations have revealed the formation of the “gas complexes” LnAl3Cl12 and LnAl4Cl15. The holmium-containing title compound has now been characterized by X-ray structure analysis. HoAl3Cl12 contains square HoCl8 antiprisms edge-linked with AlCl4 tetrahedra, resulting in the overall formation of screw-shaped chains.

    13. Synthesis, Structure and Magnetic Properties of a Dinuclear Manganese(II) Complex with One μ-Aqua and Two μ-Carboxylato Bridges (pages 1365–1367)

      Dr. Andrea Caneschi, Fabrizio Ferraro, Prof. Dr. Dante Gatteschi, Maria Chiara Melandri, Dr. Paul Rey and Dr. Roberta Sessoli

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913651

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A water molecule between two complexed MnII centers—that is the salient feature of the title compound 1 (L = dihydroimidazole unit with N[BOND]O and N[BOND]O· functions). A μ-bridge similar to that in 1 might be present in many natural proteins, for example in the oxygen-transporting protein hemerythrin. Simple MnII model complexes containing O2⊖ and OH bridges were previously unknown. The d5 ions in this series of complexes are antiferromagnetically coupled; the coupling constants decrease by about an order of magnitude for each step on going from O2⊖ to OH to H2O.

    14. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a Phospholyl Anion (pages 1367–1368)

      Trevor Douglas and Prof. Klaus H. Theopold

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913671

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple and efficient synthesis of the phospholyl anion 3 was achieved by reaction of zirconacyclopentadiene 1 with PCl3 and Li/TMEDA (TMEDA = tetramethylethylenediamine). The structural parameters obtained by X-ray analysis confirm that 3 is aromatic. This procedure for the preparation of 3 appears to be applicable to other precursors.

    15. Comments on the Molecular Structure and Bonding In [W4Cl(O)(OiPr)9] and [W4(O)(OiPr)10]. Analogies with Tetranuclear Carbonyl Clusters (pages 1368–1370)

      Prof. Malcolm H. Chisholm, Dr. Kirsten Folting, Charles E. Hammond, Dr. John C. Huffman and James D. Martin

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913681

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Discovery of the 12-electron clusters 1 and 2 has afforded insights into the complementary bonding in clusters of early and late transition metals with alkoxide and carbonyl ligands, respectively. In 1, a WCl(OiPr) unit caps a triangular W3 fragment; similarly, in cluster 3, PtL2 caps an Os3 triangle. Compared with the d10 PtL2 fragment, however, the d4 WCl(OiPr) unit is a stronger electron acceptor. This leads to marked changes in the M[BOND]M bond in the alkoxide/carbonyl clusters of the early/late transition metals.

    16. Complexation of a Novel Organoytterbium(II) Ligand with Dimethylplatinum(II): Crystal Structure of the Resulting Heterobimetallic Complex (pages 1370–1371)

      Dr. Glen B. Deacon, Dipl.-Chem. Andreas Dietrich, Craig M. Forsyth and Prof. Dr. Herbert Schumann

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913701

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Interaction of the metal centers in heterobimetallic complexes can lead to unusual catalytic properties. Complex 1, however, lacks the prerequisites for such interaction since the metal centers are separated by 5.01 Å. The title reaction results in no essential change in the coordination of either Yb or Pt (L [DOUBLE BOND] Ph2P[BOND]C5H4).

    17. Mechanism of the Hetero-Diels–Alder Reaction of Oxadienes and Alkenes: Calculation of the Acrolein/Ethene System (pages 1371–1373)

      Prof. Dr. Lutz F. Tietze, Jens Fennen and Prof. Dr. Ernst Anders

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913711

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The reaction profiles of the (hetero) Diels–Alder reactions acrolein + ethene [Eq. (a)] and butadiene + ethene are surprisingly different. Extensive AM1 /CI calculations revealed that, for reaction (a), the uncomplicated RHF method gave satisfactory results. RHF, UHF, and CI calculations gave only slightly differing results for the properties of the second transition state, which is generally rate-determining. The existence of a polar-radicaloid intermediate only slightly stabilized relative to the two transition states cannot be ruled out.

    18. Generation and Ionization Pattern of the Iso(valence)electronic Compounds CIP([DOUBLE BOND]O)2 and CIP([DOUBLE BOND]S)2 (pages 1373–1376)

      Prof. Dr. Manfred Meisel, Prof. Dr. Hans Bock, Dr. Bahman Solouki and Dipl.-Chem. Matthias Kremer

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913731

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The title compounds may be regarded as a missing link in the series of planar 24-electron compounds Cl3B, Cl2CS, ClPS2, ClPO2, C1NO2, SO3. They are readily accessible by dissociation of betaine 1. The electron distribution in the compounds of this series is discussed on the basis of PE spectra. The positively charged centers are surrounded in a starlike fashion by substituents that are mostly negatively charged (X [DOUBLE BOND] O, S).

    19. Aggregation of Metal Ions with Functionalized, Calixarenes: Synthesis and Structure of an, Octanuclear Copper(I) Chloride Complex (pages 1376–1377)

      Prof. Dr. Carlo Floriani, Dr. Denis Jacoby, Prof. Dr. Angiola Chiesi-Villa and Dr. Carlo Guastini

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913761

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      New phosphorus-containing donor ligands capable of coordinating to several metal atoms are derived from a calix[4]arene derivative. This ligand is a cyclic tetramer consisting of m-linked (2-R2PO-5-tBuC6H2)-CH2 units. Shown on the right is half of the centrosymmetric complex formed upon reaction of this ligand with [Cu(CO)Cl]n. Four differently bonded copper atoms are present (the ligands R are omitted).

    20. [Ir2(μ-CH2)(CO)4 Me2PCH2P(Me2)2][CF3SO3]2, an Unprecedented Electrophilic Methylene Complex; H Addition to Prepare a Bridging Methyl Complex (pages 1377–1379)

      Mark K. Reinking, Phillip E. Fanwick and Prof. Clifford P. Kubiak

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913771

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The μ-CH2 bridge of 1 is attacked nucleophilically and not—as usually the case—electrophilically. This dramatic difference between 1 and Herrmann carbene complexes might be due to the combination of dication character and four CO ligands, which reduces the electron density at the metal center available for the free p orbital of the CH2 ligand. Complex 1 is formed as shown in Equation (a) and reacts, for example, with the H donor HBsBumath image to give the methyl-bridged complex [Ir2(CO)2(μ-CH3)L2]X, X [DOUBLE BOND] CF3SO3.

    21. all-cis-1,4,7,10-Cyclododecatetraene—X-Ray Structure Analysis and Photoelectron Spectrum (pages 1379–1381)

      Dipl.-Chem. Alfred Krause, Prof. Dr. Hans Musso, Prof. Dr. Wilhelm Boland, Prof. Dr. Reinhart Ahlrichs, Prof. Dr. Rolf Gleiter, Dr. Roland Boese and Dipl.-Chem. Michael Bär

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913791

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Compound 1, all-cis-1, 4, 7, 10-cyclododecatetraene, is not homoantiaromatically destabilized. In the crystal, it is present in a highly symmetric crown conformation. PE-spectroscopic measurements and model calculations show that there are no interactions between the double bonds.

    22. The First Tricyclic Diaziridines—a Simple Synthetic Route (pages 1381–1383)

      Dr. Sergej N. Denisenko, Dipl.-Chem. Eva Pasch and Prof. Dr. Gerd Kaupp

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913811

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The tricyclic diaziridines 1(n = 1, 2) are accessible in only two steps from simple lactams. In view of the abnormal calculated (AM1) bond angle at the quaternary carbon, their stability is remarkable : however, they can be easily transformed into bicyclic protonated azomethine imines.

    23. Indium 2,4,6-Tris(trifluoromethyl)phenoxide—a Dimer with the Coordination Number Two at the Indium Atoms (pages 1383–1384)

      Mario Scholz, Dr. Mathias Noltemeyer and Prof. Dr. Herbert W. Roesky

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913831

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Low-coordinate compounds of elements of the boron group of the periodic table are a fascinating area of research. The title compound 1 is the first example of an indium(I) compound containing two-coordinate indium atoms. The sterically demanding, electron-attracting ligand should also be able to stabilize other elements in low oxidation states.

    24. Activated Aminocarbene Complexes of the Fischer Type: Synthesis, Structure, and Annelation Reactions (pages 1384–1386)

      Prof. Dr. Karl Heinz Dötz, Dr. Douglas Grotjahn and Dr. Klaus Harms

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913841

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Introduction of N-terminal acyl or Boc functions allows activation of aminocarbene complexes such as 1—even at room temperature, CO is lost and five-membered ring acylaminocarbene chelate complexes such as 2 are formed. These complexes can be annelated by alkynes under mild conditions to give five-membered (e.g., 3) and six-membered ring compounds.

    25. Chlorocarbon Activation: Catalytic Carbonylation of Dichloromethane and Chlorobenzene (pages 1386–1388)

      Dr. Marc Huser, Dr. Marie- Thérèse Youinou and Prof. Dr. John A. Osborn

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913861

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalytic reactions of the type dichloromethane [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] ketene and chlorobenzene [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] benzoic acid esters (or benzaldehyde) are possible with Pd complexes, although the turnover numbers are still small. The C[BOND]Cl bond in CH2C12 is even activated by [Pd(PCy3)2(dba)]/PCy3 and the C[BOND]Cl bond in PhCI by Pd(CH3COO)2/PCy3 (Cy = cyclohexyl). The nature of the phosphane is decisive in these reactions : their basicity and cone angle must lie within a certain range. Initial products in the carbonylation are complexes 1 and 2.

    26. Pronounced Anion Dependence of Valence Detrapping Temperature in Mixed-Valence 1′, 1‴-Disubstituted Biferrocenium Salts (pages 1388–1390)

      Robert J. Webb, Prof. Dr. Arnold L. Rheingold, Steven J. Geib, Donna L. Staley and Prof. Dr. David N. Hendrickson

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913881

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The rate of intramolecular electron transfer changes from > 109 s−1 at 4.2 K to < 107 at 350 K when Imath image is exchanged for PFmath image in the mixed-valence solid diiodobiferrocenium salt 1. This is revealed by Mössbauer and EPR spectra. Coulomb interactions between cation and surrounding anions are decisive for the rate of electron transfer.

    27. Novel Nickel Clusters with Se and Cp′ as Ligands: [Ni4Se2(CO)BrCp′3], [Ni6Se4Cp′5], [Ni15Se10(CO)3CP′8], and [Ni15Se10(CO)Cl2Cp′8] (pages 1390–1392)

      Prof. Dr. Dieter Fenske and Dipl.-Chem. Achim Hollnagel

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913901

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal-rich cluster compounds having novel structures are formed upon reaction of [NiCp′(CO)Br] (Cp′ = methylcyclopentadienyl) with Se(SiMe3)2—the 66-electron cluster 1 is the presumed reactive intermediate involved in the formation of larger clusters. A total of four complexes were isolated by fractional crystallization. All were characterized by X-ray structure analysis.

    28. X-Ray Structure Analysis of α-Lithiophenylacetonitrile · Lithium Diisopropyl amide· 2 Tetramethylethylenediamine—a “Quasi-Dianion Complex” (pages 1392–1394)

      Dipl.-Chem. Wolfgang Zarges, Michael Marsch, Dr. Klaus Harms and Prof. Dr. Gernot Boche

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913921

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors report the first structural characterization of the adduct formed between a monoanion and a base, such as that formed by reaction of a carbon acid (here, phenylacetonitrile) with ≥2 molar equivalents of base (here, lithium diisopropylamide)— namely, “QUADAC” (1.2 TMEDA). It reacts as a “dianion” with alkyl halides and D2O to give dialkylated and dideuterated products, respectively.

    29. A Polymolecular Donor–Acceptor Stack Made of Paraquat and a 1, 5-Dihydroxynaphthalene- Derived Crown Ether (pages 1394–1395)

      Dr. Jean-Yves Ortholand, Alexandra M. Z. Slawin, Dr. Neil Spencer, Dr. J. Fraser Stoddart and Dr. David J. Williams

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913941

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Paraquat dications enclosed sandwichlike within and between dodecaoxa[16.16]naphthalenophane macrocycles characterize the solid-state 1:2 complex 1, which forms continuous donor–acceptor stacks. The distances between the ring planes of the naphthalene and paraquat units are uniformly short. The novel complex 1 is of particular interest as a potential organic conductor.

    30. A [2] Catenane Made to Order (pages 1396–1399)

      Peter R. Ashton, Timothy T. Goodnow, Prof. Angel E. Kaifer, Mark V. Reddington, Alexandra M. Z. Slawin, Dr. Neil Spencer, Dr. J. Fraser Stoddart, Cristina Vicent and Dr. David J. Williams

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913961

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A template-controlled, one-pot reaction afforded the [2]catenane 1 in 70% yield. Compound 1 consists of π-electron-rich decaoxa[13.13]paracyclophane (empty circles) and an electron-deficient macrocycle made up of two paraquat p-phenylene units (filled circles). Dynamic 1 H NMR spectroscopy and cyclovoltammetry showed that 1 is highly ordered not only in the solid state but also in solution.

    31. (4RS,5R)- and (4RS,5S)-4-Methoxy-5-methyloxazolidin-2-one Derivatives of Threonine—Interesting Chiral Amidoalkylating Reagents (pages 1399–1401)

      Dipl.-Chem. Christians Herborn, Andrea Zietlow and Prof. Dr. Eberhard Steckhan

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198913991

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The syntheses of biologically active, complex organic nitrogen-containing compounds often require amidoalkylating reagents. The methoxy groups of the chiral title compounds may be easily substituted by other nucleophiles with good stereochemical control. The key step in this two-step synthesis is the quantitative anodic decarboxylation of the corresponding carboxylic acids (e.g., 1[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]2).

  3. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Materials Forum
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
  4. Editorial Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Materials Forum
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. The European Ceramic Society (ECerS) (pages 1406–1407)

      Prof. Rudi Metselaar

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914061

      Editorial Essay: The European Ceramic Society (ECerS) is a federation of ceramic societies from eleven European nations. The Society was run for the first two years of its existence by the Dutch ceramists but now control has passed over to the Germans who will direct matters for the next two years. The first president of the new Society explains its aims and constitution.

  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Materials Forum
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Liquid Crystalline Elastomers (pages 1407–1415)

      Priv. Doz. Rudolf Zentel

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Review: Multifunctional and oriented structures are of crucial importance in materials science. Liquid crystalline (LC) elastomers are supramolecular systems which combine the properties of LC phases (order and mobility) with rubber elasticity, a typical property of polymers. LC elastomers with different molecular structures can be prepared by cross linking LC polymers (see figure) while retaining the LC phases.

    2. Superfine Oxide Powders—Flame Hydrolysis and Hydrothermal Synthesis (pages 1416–1423)

      Dr. Gangolf W. Kriechbaum and Dr. Peter Kleinschmit

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Review: Nanocrystalline materials which can be plastically deformed at low temperatures have revolutionized the applications for ceramics. Two methods for the production of high-tech ceramics with grain sizes of less than 1 μm are described and the quality of the materials, for example ZrO2 powder (see figure), assessed.

    3. Liquid Crystals—New Compounds, New Applications (pages 1424–1429)

      Dr. Rudolf Eidenschink

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914241

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Review: Low molecular weight liquid crystals have been used extensively in electrooptic displays. New non-polymer thermotropic materials (see figure for an example) have now opened the way to further technical applications such as anisotropic reaction media, brake and clutch systems, laser optics and, of course, more varied electrooptic devices.

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Materials Forum
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. High Resolution Solid State NMR of Quadrupolar Nuclei (pages 1429–1430)

      Priv. Doz. Bernhard Blümich

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914291

      Research News: Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS) and Double Rotation (DOR) solid state NMR are two new methods which have recently been applied to the study of elements with half integral quadrupolar spins. An increase in resolution is achieved over magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR by spinning the sample at two different angles, either sequentially (DAS), or simultaneously (DOR).

    2. Biomaterials Highlights III: Bone Replacements: Implant Materials and the Modes of Implant Fixation (pages 1431–1434)

      Prof. Günther Heimke

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914311

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Research News: Biomaterials Highlights III. In the third article of the series, the methods which are used to fix implants to the body's tissue are examined, which include cementing and mechanical fixation. The surfaces of the implants play an important role in interactions with the body. Various coatings are described and the application of isoelastic implants discussed.

  7. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Materials Forum
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Graphite Intercalation Compounds in Berlin (pages 1434–1435)

      Dr. Ralph Setton

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914341

      Conference Reports:Ralph Setton reports on his visit to an international symposium on graphite intercalation compounds, Hermann Schmalzried on the Annual Meeting of the German physical chemists which this year concentrated on solid state chemistry and physics, and Hans Reuter on a meeting on the sol–gel processing of ceramics.

    2. Solids: Dynamics and Kinetics in Siegen (pages 1436–1437)

      Prof. Dr. Hermann Schmalzried

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914361

      Conference Reports:Ralph Setton reports on his visit to an international symposium on graphite intercalation compounds, Hermann Schmalzried on the Annual Meeting of the German physical chemists which this year concentrated on solid state chemistry and physics, and Hans Reuter on a meeting on the sol–gel processing of ceramics.

    3. Sol—Gel Processing in Bad Honnef (pages 1437–1438)

      Dr. Hans Reuter

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914371

      Conference Reports:Ralph Setton reports on his visit to an international symposium on graphite intercalation compounds, Hermann Schmalzried on the Annual Meeting of the German physical chemists which this year concentrated on solid state chemistry and physics, and Hans Reuter on a meeting on the sol–gel processing of ceramics.

  8. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Materials Forum
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Materials Forum (pages 1438–1439)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914381

  9. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Materials Forum
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Book Review: Silicon-nitride in Electronics. By V. J. Belyi (pages 1441–1442)

      H. Gernoth

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914412

    2. Book Review: Fiber Reinforcement for Composite Materials. Edited by A. R. Bunsell (page 1443)

      A. Hölscher and K. Schulte

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914431

  10. Conference Calendar

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    9. Materials Forum
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Conference Calendar (pages 1443–1444)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914432

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