Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 28 Issue 11

November 1989

Volume 28, Issue 11

Pages 1445–1600

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 11/1989)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914451

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a pattern of data (0,1,0,1,0…)—pits—on a magneto-optic storage disk which is read with a semiconductor laser. The storage medium is a lanthanoid-transition metal alloy, whose magnetism is directed upwards and perpendicular to the disk. In the bright domains (ca. 1 μm) the magnetization is directed perpendicularly downwards. The plane of polarized light is rotated by the data pits, so that the magnetization pattern can be observed with a microscope. The data are read with the laser beam according to a similar principle. For determining the dynamic write-read properties, pits have been marked with three different frequencies. Guide grooves in the surface serve for orientation on the disk. More about materials for optical data storage is reported by M. Emmelius et al. on page 1475 ff.

    2. Graphical Abstract (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 11/1989)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914452

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. Materials for Optical Data Storage (pages 1445–1471)

      Dr. Michael Emmelius, Dr. Georg Pawlowski and Prof. Dr. Hansjörg W. Vollmann

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914453

      Data marking with laser light—that is optical data storage, whose most obvious advantage over magnetic storage is non-contact operation. In the present review the following questions are dealt with: How do optical memories function? What advantages do they offer? Are optical memories conceivable for the future which can compete with current data storage methods? Which structure-property relationships characterize substances that are suitable as optical storage media? These are mainly IR-absorbing dyes and lanthanoid–transition metal alloys.

    2. The Crystal Chemistry of High-Temperature Oxide Superconductors and Materials with Related Structures (pages 1472–1493)

      Prof. Dr. Hanskarl Müller-Buschbaum

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914721

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      La2−x SrxCuO4 can be regarded as the prototype of high-temperature oxide superconductors. The property of being superconducting above the boiling point of nitrogen is undoubtedly closely related to the crystal chemistry of the individual phases and compounds. Common to all oxide superconductors is the participation of copper in the crystal structure and—with exception of Nd2−x CexCuO4—the stretched tetragonal-pyramidal or stretched octahedral coordination of O2− around Cu2+/Cu3+.

  2. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. Light-Sensitive Molecular Building Blocks with Electron Transfer Activity: Synthesis and Properties of a Photochemically Switchable, Dicyanovinyl-Substituted Furan (pages 1494–1496)

      Prof. Dr. Jörg Daub, Dr. Josef Salbeck, Dr. Thomas Knöchel, Dipl.-Chem. Christian Fischer, Dr. Horst Kunkely and Knut M. Rapp

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914941

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      How does a light/current switch function at the molecular level? The title compounds could contribute to a deeper understanding. Visible light transforms 1 into 2. Both 1 as well as 2 are electron-transfer active. Since 2 is reduced electrochemically far more readily than 1, photochemically modulated current pulses are observed (R = 5-(2,2-dicyanovinyl)-2-furyl).

    2. [{Cp′(CO)2Mn}2PbStBu]; Completion of an Isoelectronic Series of Binuclear Complexes Containing Trigonal-Planar Coordinated Main Group Elements (pages 1496–1498)

      Dipl.-Chem. Frank Ettel, Prof. Dr. G. Huttner and Dr. Laszlo Zsolnai

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914961

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Also an element of the fourth main group can function as central atom in complexes of type 1, which hitherto was known only for elements of the fifth and sixth main groups. This has been demonstrated by the reaction of the heterocummulene [Cp′(CO)2Mn[DOUBLE BOND]Pb[DOUBLE BOND]Mn(CO)2Cp′] with LiStBu, which afforded 1, X = PbStBu. That the PbMn2 heterocumulene can react with more than one molecule of Lewis base is confirmed by the formation of 2 upon reaction with bipyridine.

    3. Total Synthesis of Allonojirimycin (5-Amino-5-deoxy-D-allopyranose) (pages 1498–1499)

      Yves Auberson and Prof. Pierre Vogel

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914981

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis of the title compound 2, which is of interest as glycosidase inhibitor, proceeds stereoselectively and efficiently starting from the Diels-Alder adduct 1. The chiral auxiliary reagent is recovered as (—)-camphanic acid at an early stage of the synthesis. R* = (1S)camphanoyl.

    4. Formation of 2,4,4-Trimethylthiete by Photodecarbonylation of 3,3,5-Trimethyl-2(3H)-thiophenone (pages 1499–1500)

      Dipl.-Chem. Heiko Hinrichs and Prof. Dr. Paul Margaretha

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198914991

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A very attractive alternative to the hitherto sole entry (Hoffmann elimination of amines) to thiete derivatives such as 1 is provided by the title reaction. It is substantially milder—the thermally not very stable thietes can also be prepared at low temperatures—and enables a broad pattern of substitution. 1 reacts with water to give 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one 2.

    5. Triorganolead Cations Stabilized by Size-on Coordination to the C[TRIPLE BOND]C Bond in Alkynylborates (pages 1500–1502)

      Prof. Dr. Bernd Wrackmeyer, Dipl.-Chem. Klaus Horchler and Dr. Roland Boese

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The first complexes containing an alkynide ligand which bridges two different main group elements in an η2 (σ,π) bond have been detected by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and X-ray structure analyses. The compounds 2, in which the triorganolead cation is stabilized by side-on coordination to the C[TRIPLE BOND]C bond, are formed via cleavage of the lead-alkynyl bond in the organoboration of dialkynylplumbanes 1 [Eq.(1)].

    6. The Effect of Acetylene Substituents on a PdII-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization. Total Synthesis of (–)-Sterepolide and Assignment of Absolute Stereochemistry (pages 1502–1504)

      Prof. Barry M. Trost, Philip A. Hipskind, John Y. L. Chung and Chuen Chan

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cyclopentane units in natural products such as (–)-stereopolide 3 are not easy to synthesize. A novel route starts from the non-terminal alkyne 1. Its cycloisomerization to 2 is possible in the presence of palladium(II) acetate and the ligand N,N′-bis(benzylidene)ethylenediamine. This catalytic system also cyclizes other enynes of the type 1 with e.g. CH2OCH3 or CH3 instead of OSiMe2tBu—where Pd(OAc)2 alone fails (R = p-H3COC6H4CH2).

    7. Application of the Dimethyl(phenyl)silyl Group as a Masked Form of the Hydroxy Group in the Synthesis of an L-glycero-α-D-manno-heptopyranoside-Containing Trisaccharide from the Dephosphorylated Inner Core Region of Neisseria meningitidis (pages 1504–1506)

      Drs. G. J. P. H. Boons, M. Overhand, Dr. G. A. van der Marel and Prof. Dr. J. H. van Boom

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915041

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A favorable route to immunologically relevant oligosaccharides of type 1 makes use of the dimethyl(phenyl)silyl group (PhMe2Si). Addition of the Grignard reagent PhMe2Si[BOND]CH2MgCl to a suitably protected D-mannodialdopyranose leads to chain lengthening at C-6, i.e. formation of a heptopyranoside (Hepp) building block. The dimethyl(phenyl)silyl group functions thereby as equivalent of a protected hydroxy function. As precursor of 1 a completely protected triasaccharide was synthesized which additionally contained a spacer—for coupling with a polymeric support. Cleavage of the protecting groups affords the naturally occurring oligosaccharide 1 (with spacer).

    8. The Acetonitrile(pentafluorophenyl)xenon(II) Cation, [MeCN[BOND]Xe–C6F5]: The First Structural Characterization of a Xenon[BOND]Carbon Bond (pages 1506–1507)

      Priv.-Doz. Dr. Hermann Josef Frohn, Dipl.-Chem. Stephanus Jakobs and Prof. Dr. Gerald Henkel

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915061

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The title compound containing a xenon-carbon bond can be prepared by fluorine-aryl substitution in XeF2 and crystallization from acetonitrile solution. The Xe[BOND]C bond has been characterized for the first time by a structure analysis : it is 2.092(8) Å long. Not shown in the picture on the right is the MeCN molecule coordinated to xenon.

    9. [P4Aryl6][Me3SnF2]2 (Aryl = 2,6-(MeO)2C6H3): An Unusual Ion Pair Consisting of a Planar 2,4-Diphospha-1,3-diphosphoniacyclobutane Dication and the Difluorotrimethylstannate Anion (pages 1507–1509)

      Dr. Lutz Heuer, Prof. Dr. Ludger Ernst, Prof. Dr. Reinhard Schmutzler and Dr. habil. Dietmar Schomburg

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Formally a degradation product of P4 (P4 [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] 1 [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] 2 [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] 3), the dication 3, R = 2,6(CH3O)2C6H3, has been obtained via a completely different route. Reaction of 2,6-(CH3O)2C6H3SnMe3 with PClF2 yielded the salt 3-Me3SnF2. The dication contains a planar P4 ring, and the substituents on the triple bonded P atoms are trans. The anion is also novel.

    10. The First Macrocyclic Square-Planar Cobalt(III) Complex Relieves Ring Strain by Forming a Nonplanar Amide (pages 1509–1511)

      Prof. Terrence J. Collins and Erich S. Uffelman

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Even if metal center and ligand are not perfectly matched, a complex can be formed—though not without “sacrifices”. In crystalline [Co(η4-1)] cobalt(III) is square-planar coordinated; the ligand must rotate a CO group out of the CoN4 plane in order to reduce the ring strain. [Me4N] [Co(η4-1)] forms bright red crystals.

    11. The First Example of an Ethylene-Selective Soluble Ziegler Catalyst of the Zirconocene Class (pages 1511–1512)

      Prof. Dr. Wolfgang A. Herrmann, Dr. Jürgen Rohrmann, Dr. Eberhardt Herdtweck, Dr. Walter Spaleck and Dr. Andreas Winter

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Clear structure-activity relationships were observed in the polymerization of ethylene and propylene with the novel, easily preparable catalysts 1 and 2: In the presence of methylaluminoxane, 1 polymerizes propylene with high activity to a polypropylene having a high average molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution; 2 is inactive in this reaction, but nevertheless polymerizes ethylene. The angle subtended by the indenyl ligand system appears to be decisive.

    12. Counterion Dependent Structural Diversity in Silver Polyselenides; Structures of the New Complex Anions [Ag(Se4)]math image, [Ag(Se5)]math image and [Ag4(Se4)3]2⊖ (pages 1513–1514)

      Prof. Mercouri G. Kanatzidis and Song-Ping Huang

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915131

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Large cations such as Ph4P and Pr4N favor a trigonal planar coordination, small ones such as Me4N a tetrahedral coordination of Ag in silver polyselenides. In the novel complex {[Me4N][Ag(Se5)]}n one-dimensional infinite [Ag(Se5)]math image macroanions are present in which the Semath image ligands bridge three Ag atoms (see 1).

    13. Side-chain Homologues of 20-Hydroxyecdysone: Synthesis, Configurational Assignment, and Biochemical Characterization (pages 1515–1518)

      Dr. Udo Hedtmann, Dipl.-Ing. Kurt Hobert, Dipl.-Chem. Ralf Klintz, Prof. Dr. Peter Welzel, Dr. Jadwiga Frelek, Dipl.-Chem. Magdalena Strangmann-Diekmann, Dipl.-Chem. Antje Klöne and Prof. Dr. Olaf Pongs

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The postembryonic development of insects and crustaceans is controlled hormonally by 20-hydroxyecdysone 1. The ecdysteroid receptor in invertebrates, however, has remained virtually uncharacterized. A compound 2 has now been synthesized which is suitable for the identification of the receptor (by affinity labeling) and for the isolation (by affinity chromatography).

    14. Reaction of Decamethylsilicocene with Sulfur, Selenium, and Tellurium : From a pπ[BOND]pπ System to New Heterocycles (pages 1518–1519)

      Prof. Dr. Peter Jutzi, Dipl.-Chem. Andreas Möhrke, Prof. Dr. Achim Müller and Dr. Hartmut Bögge

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915181

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An η51-haptotropic rearrangement in the reaction of (η5-Cp*)2Si and nBu3P = Se leads to intermediary formation of (η1-Cp*)2Si = Se, which can be trapped with dimethylbutadiene. End products of the reaction of Cpmath image Si with sulfur-, selenium- and tellurium-sources, however, are heterocycles: for example, reaction with nBu3P = Te leads to the tritelluradisilol 1, the first neutral tellurium-silicon heterocycle.

    15. Water-Soluble Porphyrin Diglycosides with Photosensitizing Properties (pages 1519–1521)

      Dr. Gerd Fülling, Dipl.-Chem. Doris Schröder and Prof. Dr. Burchard Franck

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915191

      In the presence of oxygen, tumors and viruses can be destroyed by photosensitizing porphyrins. Indispensable for clinical applications is, inter alia, a good solubility in water. It has now been possible to prepare two porphyrin diglycosides which are water-soluble and stable as well as equally strongly photosensitizing as Rose Bengal. With these properties they ideally fulfill the demands of a wide spectrum of photomedicinal applications.

    16. Thermal and Electrocatalytic Epimerization at Iron as the Chiral Center (pages 1521–1523)

      Prof. Dr. Henri Brunner, Dipl.-Chem. Konrad Fisch, Prof. Dr. Peter G. Jones and Dr. Josef Salbeck

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915211

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electron-transfer-induced configurational changes at the Fe atom of complexes were first demonstrated by way of examples 1 and 2. Upon reductive inducement with sodium amalgam only the indenyl compound 2 eperimizes; upon oxidative inducement with Cp2FePF6 both complexes epimerize. These electrocatalytic reactions are accelerated enormously compared to the thermal epimerization

    17. Versatile Modes of Allene Bonding in the Structures of [W2(OtBu)6(C3H4)], [W2(OtBu)6(C3H4)(CO)2], and [W2(OtBu)6(C3H4)2] (pages 1523–1525)

      Dr. Roger H. Cayton, Stephanie T. Chacon, Prof. Malcolm H. Chisholm, Dr. Mark J. Hampden-Smith, Dr. John C. Huffman, Dr. Kirsten Folting, Prof. Paul D. Ellis and Beth A. Huggins

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915231

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The allene moiety and the W2 center in the complex 1 are parallel—this coordination is unprecedented. Addition of CO or allene to 1 yields the two other title compounds, respectively, in which an allene is η13-bonded and two CO groups or an additional η2-C3H4 ligand (see formula on the right) is present.

    18. 4 6-Dimethylenetricyclo[3.3.0.03,7]octane-2-one and 2,4,6-Trimethylenetricyclo[3.3.0.03,7]octane (pages 1525–1526)

      Prof. Dr. Rolf Gleiter, Dipl.-Chem. Christoph Sigwart and Dr. Bernd Kissler

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915251

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Following the synthesis of the “stelladienes” 1 and 2 it has now been possible to prepare the triene 3 in five steps from readily accessible starting compounds. The highly strained triene 3 has two 1,5-hexadiene units and readily rearranges into the tricyclo[5.2.1.04,10] decadiene derivative 4.

    19. The Structure of BrFmath image and Related Compounds (pages 1526–1527)

      Dipl.-Chem. Ali Reza Mahjoub, Dr. Andrzej Hoser, Prof. Dr. Joachim Fuchs and Prof. Dr. Konrad Seppelt

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The anion BrFmath image 1 is almost perfectly octahedral in crystalline CsBrFmath image. This finding is contrary to the common belief that non-bonding electron pairs are sterically active. The reason for the structure of 1 can be that the free electrons have s character and are therefore arranged centrosymmetrically. The associate of IF5 and F, on the other hand, has distorted octahedral geometry, like the isoelectronic XeF6.

    20. Establishment of Configurations for the Two Diastereomeric C-Glucosylanthrones Aloin A and Aloin B (pages 1528–1529)

      Prof. Dr. Hans W. Rauwald, Karsten Lohse and Dr. Jan W. Bats

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915281

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Almost 140 years after the first isolation of the principal component aloin of the world-wide used drug Aloe barbadensis, the absolute configuration of aloin B 1 at C10 has now been established by an X-ray structure analysis as R and thus that of aloin A as S. The instability of the two diastereomers in solution had hitherto prevented the cultivation of single crystals.

    21. Indigo-Metal Complexes: Synthesis and Structure of PdII and PtII Compounds Containing the Anions of Indigo and Octahydroindigo as Mono- and Bis-Chelate Ligands (pages 1529–1531)

      Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Beck, Dipl.-Chem. Christoph Schmidt, Rolf Wienold, Manfred Steimann and Dipl.-Chem. Barbara Wagner

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915291

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Indigo-metal complexes, which have now been obtained for the first time in soluble, crystalline form, could be useful as energy transfer agents or catalysts. Two palladium(II) complexes with indigo as mono-chelate ligand (cf. 1) or octahydroindigo as bischelate ligand have been characterized by X-ray structure analyses. Intra- and intermolecular N[BOND]H…O bridges of the free indigo are absent in complex 1.

    22. Stack-Type Redox Systems: Synthesis via Repeated Carbanion Alkylation and Electron Transfer Studies (pages 1531–1533)

      Dipl.-Chem. Jürgen Alexander, Dipl.-Chem. Marianne Ehrenfreund, Dr. Jürgen Fiedler, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Walter Huber, Dipl.-Chem. Hans-Joachim Räder and Prof. Dr. Klaus Müllen

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915311

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stacked [14] annulenes with up to five layers (cf. e.g. 1) are accessible in a one-pot reaction by repetitive reductive alkylation of dicyclopentaheptalene. The oligomers can be distinguished NMR spectroscopically by the strong magnetic anisotropy of the subunits. ESR spectra show that the unpaired electrons of the radical monoanions of some compounds are delocalized over all layers.

  3. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. Book Review: The Chemistry of Macrocyclic Ligand Complexes. By L. F. Lindoy (page 1534)

      J. Fraser Stoddart

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915341

    2. Book Review: Organic High Pressure Chemistry. Edited by W. J. LeNoble (pages 1535–1536)

      Frank-Gerrit Klärner

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915351

    3. Book Review: Carbocycle Construction in Terpene Synthesis. By Tse-Lok Ho (page 1537)

      Georg Fráter

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915371

  4. Editorial Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. How to Tailor Molecular Electronics or Why is Nature Taking the ‘Soft’ Approach? (pages 1544–1547)

      Prof. Dietrich Haarer

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915441

      Editorial Essay: Nature performs “molecular electronics” with astounding efficiency. Now, researchers attempt to duplicate these processes in order to produce, for example, molecular switches. The recent direction of molecular electronics work has been towards ever increasing miniaturization but this is in fact not how nature approaches the problem. The current status of human “molecular electronics” is assessed and compared with nature's highly successful version.

  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. Polymer Optical Fibers and Nonlinear Optical Device Principles (pages 1548–1559)

      Dr. W. Groh, Dr. D. Lupo and Prof. H. Sixl

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915481

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Review: Optoelectronics is a field where polymer systems play a crucial role. In this article, new types of polymer optic fibers are examined and nonlinear optical device design is discussed. The figure shows a star bus network, one of the systems into which Langmuir–Blodgett films and electrically poled polymers are incorporated.

    2. High-Performance Silicon Nitride Materials (pages 1560–1569)

      Dr. Cornelia Boberski, Dr. Rainer Hamminger, Dr. Marcell Peuckert, Dr. Fritz Aldinger, Dr. Reinhard Dillinger, Dr. Jürgen Heinrich and Dr. Jürgen Huber

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915601

      Review: Silicon Nitride (Si3N4) is a ceramic which shows high performance at high temperatures and therefore has potential for incorporation into car engines. For this application, however, the material must be produced to consistently high standards and exhibit uniform properties. This has, in the past, presented problems to development and process engineers. Progress in this field from the point of view of workers from Hoechst is summarized, and future directions of research are discussed.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. Spatially Selective Conducting Patterns in Transparent Films Derived from Ladder Type Polymers (pages 1569–1571)

      Igal Belaish, Prof. Dan Davidov, Prof. Heny Selig, Dr. Malcolm R. McLean and Prof. Larry Dalton

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915691

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Communication: Conducting patterns embedded in a completely transparent polymer film can be produced using selective heating by laser annealing of coss-linked, stable, ladder-like polymers followed by fluorination. The figure shows a transparent film treated in this way containing the permanent, conducting pattern.

    2. Highly Conjugated, Substituted Polyacetylenes via the Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization of Substituted Cyclooctatetraenes (pages 1571–1574)

      Christopher B. Gorman, Eric J. Ginsburg, Dr. Seth R. Marder and Prof. Robert H. Grubbs

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915711

      Communication: Soluble polyacetylenes with high conjugation length and high molecular weight are a goal of polymer scientists. The ring-opening metathesis polymerization of substituted cyclooctatetraenes (COT) to form soluble substituted polyacetylenes which display iodine doped conductivities in the range 0.1 to 50 S/cm are reported. The solubility is imparted by the alkyl groups which occupy, on average, every eighth carbon atom of the polymer backbone.

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. Monolayers and Langmuir–Blodgett Multilayers of Discotic Liquid Crystals? (pages 1574–1577)

      Dr. André Laschewsky

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915741

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Research News: Discotic liquid crystals were discovered in 1977. Since then these systems, composed of large planar aromatic moieties or inflexible macrocyclic units surrounded by “wing” groups (see figure, R[DOUBLE BOND]C8H17) have attracted much attention especially in thin film technology. The development and future of these compounds are discussed.

    2. Surface Analysis I: Imaging Surfaces, Electric Charges and Magnetic Domains with the Atomic Force Microscope (pages 1578–1581)

      Dr. Jürgen P. Rabe

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915781

      Research News: Surface Analysis I. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) provides a method of imaging surfaces on an atomic scale. Closely related to STM, AFM can, however, image insulating materials such as organic molecules. The technique is described and some recent applications discussed in the first article of a regular series from Jürgen Rabe on surface analysis techniques.

    3. Low Temperature Deposition of a CaF2 Insulator Layer on GaAs* (pages 1581–1582)

      Dr. A. W. Vere, Dr. K. J. Mackey, Dr. D. C. Rodway, Dr. P. C. Smith, Dr. D. M. Frigo and Prof. D. C. Bradley

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915811

      Research News: Multilayer semiconductor–insulator structures composed of epitaxially grown layers of, for example, GaAs and CaF2 have been the subject of widespread interest in recent years. The methods used to overcome lattice mismatch problems in order to obtain high quality insulator thin films are discussed along with photochemical decomposition methods for their production at low temperatures.

  8. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. Ceramics in Maastricht (pages 1583–1584)

      Prof. Richard J. Brook

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915831

    2. Large Area Chromogenics in Gothenburg (pages 1584–1585)

      Dr. Tord Eriksson

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915841

    3. Storage and Transfer of Molecular Information in Strasbourg (pages 1585–1586)

      Dr. Jean-Paul Behr

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915851

    4. Materials Science and Technology in Karlsruhe (pages 1587–1588)

      Dipl.-Ing. Bernd Eigenmann

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915871

  9. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. Materials Forum (pages 1589–1591)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915891

  10. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. Book Review: Analysis of Polymers. An Introduction By T. R. Crompton (page 1595)

      J. H. Wendorff

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915951

  11. Conference Calendar

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Research News
    9. Conference Report
    10. Materials Forum
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Conference Calendar
    1. Conference Calender (pages 1596–1600)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198915961

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