Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 28 Issue 5

May 1989

Volume 28, Issue 5

Pages 535–676

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 5/1989)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905351

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover illustration shows the computer-aided design of an artificial protein exhibiting a six-helix bundle structure. The molecule represents a typical candidate of a “Template-Assembled Synthetic Protein” (TASP) and was designed as a membrane channel forming protein (K. Gubernator, M. Mutter). The TASP strategy for the construction of new proteins aims to bypass the folding problem encountered in todays protein de novo design by template-directed assembly of peptide chains to a well-defined packing arrangement (in the depicted example, the template is a cyclic 12-amino acid peptide (blue), the six helices in red, orange and magenta are covalently attached via the lysine side chains of the template). In the light of our recent understanding of protein folding, Mutter and Vuilleumier discuss the foundations and prospects of this protein design by chemical tools on pages 535 ff.

    2. Graphical Abstract (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 5/1989)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905352

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Correspondences
    6. Editorial Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Panel Discussion
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. A Chemical Approach to Protein Design—Template-Assembled Synthetic Proteins (TASP) (pages 535–554)

      Prof. Dr. Manfred Mutter and Dipl.-Nattw. Stéphane Vuilleumier

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905353

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The decisive hurdle on the way to the construction of new proteins with tailormade properties is our poor understanding of the complex folding pathways of polypeptide chains into spatially well-defined structures. The chemist can circumvent this difficultly by constructing molecules which fold markedly better into globular structures (left-hand side of picture below) than natural proteins. The trick in the TASP concept is the covalent attachment of (e. g. three to five) amphiphilic helix blocks to a linear template molecule. The globular tertiary structure (right) is then formed by self-association of the helix blocks.

    2. Chemical Modifications of Biopolymers by Quinones and Quinone Methides (pages 555–570)

      Prof. Dr. Martin G. Peter

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905551

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lignins, melanoproteins, the exoskeleton of insects and many other high molecular natural products are made up entirely or partly of quinones or quinone methides. These compounds and/or their phenolic precursors are widely distributed in nature. N-acetyldopamine 1, for example, was isolated from the larvae of blowflies and identified as sclerotizing agent. Important new insights into such compounds have been made possible by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    3. Structure and Dynamics of Chiral Molecules (pages 571–586)

      Professor Dr. Martin Quack

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905711

      There are still fundamentally conflicting theoretical views of the physical origin of molecular chirality. Theories on the structure and dynamics of chiral molecules as well as experiments which should lead to a decision between the current hypotheses are presented under the headings classical hypothesis, Hund's hypothesis, Pfeifer's superselection rule hypothesis, collision hypothesis as well as weak nuclear interaction and parity violation in molecules.

  2. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Correspondences
    6. Editorial Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Panel Discussion
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Stereocontrolled Total Synthesis of (5S,6R)-, (5S,6S)-, (5R,6R)-, and (5R,6S)(7E,9E,11Z,14Z)-5,6-Dihydroxy-7,9,11,14-icosatetraenoic Acid (5,6-DiHETE) Methyl Esters (pages 587–588)

      K. C. Nicolaou, J. Y. Ramphal, J. M. Palazon and R. A. Spanevello

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905871

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The (5S, 6R)-configurated title compound 1 is of interest as a biologically active metabolite of arachidonic acid. A method for the synthesis of 1 which also can be extended to the enantiomer and the two diastereomers now makes these compounds readily accessible in amounts satisfactory enough for biological experiments.

    2. Azonia Derivatives of Arenes: Synthesis and Properties of 10c-Azoniafluoranthene (pages 588–590)

      Dr. Marc Fourmigué, Kamal Boubekeur, Dr. Patrick Batail and Prof. Dr. Klaus Bechgaard

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905881

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      To prepare arene-radical ion salts also persistent in the solid state was the aim of the synthesis of 1 outlined below. The reduction of 1 to the neutral radical 1, which is isoelectronic with the fluoranthene radical anion, is quasireversible. Despite its persistence for several hours in O2-free solution the neutral radical 1, which may possibly be suitable as magnet-field probe, could still not be isolated as solid.

    3. A Joint Structural Characterization of Colloidal Platinum by EXAFS and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy (pages 590–593)

      Daniel G. Duff, Dr. Peter P. Edwards, Prof. John Evans, Dr. J. Trevor Gauntlett, Dr. David A. Jefferson, Dr. Brian F. G. Johnson, Angus I. Kirkland and Prof. David J. Smith

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905901

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The accurate determination of lattice parameters of small colloidal Pt particles in solution can be accomplished by EXAFS analysis. Thus, it could be demonstrated that a lattice contraction (0.4 %) takes place in the transition from the metal to the colloidal state. The results of the EXAFS investigations supplement those obtained by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). The diagram on the right shows a typical HREM photograph of a colloid particle with perfect cubic face centered lattice.

    4. Efficient Photoinduced Intramolecular Energy Transfer in an Oblique Bis-Porphyrin System (pages 593–595)

      Sylvie Chardon-Noblat, Dr. Jean-Pierre Sauvage and Dr. Paul Mathis

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905931

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      Despite a distance of ca. 13 Å between the centers, after photochemical excitation the energy of readily accessible 1 is very rapidly transferred from the zinc-containing porphyrin moiety to the metal-free porphyrin moiety. Electrochemical and emission spectroscopic data give a driving force of 0.17 eV for this energy transfer. A photochemically-induced electron transfer (driving force 0.07 eV), on the other hand, is not observed M 1 = Zn,M2 = 2H; R = tBu2C6H3.

    5. Towards Tribenzoacepentalene: Tribenzotriquinacene, Dihydrotribenzo-acepentalenediide, and the Tribenzoacepentalene Radical Anion (pages 595–597)

      Dr. Dietmar Kuck, Dipl.-Chem. Andreas Schuster, Dipl.-Chem. Björk Ohlhorst, Dr. Volker Sinnwell and Prof. Dr. Armin de Meijere

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905951

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      The four title compounds 1–4 are triply benzoannelated hydrocarbons.Whereas 1 still could not be synthesized, 2 is readily accessible via a novel route and can easily be converted into 3 and 4, both of which are more stable than the analogous derivatives of acepentalene.

    6. Electron Densities, Deformation Densities, and Chemical Bonding (pages 597–600)

      Prof. Dr. W. H. Eugen Schwarz, Prof. Dr. Klaus Ruedenberg, Dipl.-Chem. Lothar Mensching, Dr. Lance L. Miller, Dr. Petros Valtazanos and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang von Niessen

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198905971

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Free atoms are not necessarily spherical, and atoms in a molecule are determined by their position and their orientation. Only when this is taken into consideration does one obtain well interpretable difference densities. Thus, in the case of HF, in which conventional difference densities cannot explain the experimentally confirmed covalent bond, an optimally strongly oriented F atom leads to the difference density map on the right.

    7. P6(C5Me5)2, a Tricyclic Polyphosphane (pages 600–601)

      Prof. Dr. Peter Jutzi, Dipl.-Chem. Rainer Kroos, Prof. Dr. Achim Müller and Dipl.-Chem. Michael Penk

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      1 is a phosphorus analogue of 3,4-dihydrobenzvalene which is formed via P6(C5Mes)4 in the thermolysis of P3(C5Me5)3. The P2-bridge in 1 forces an endo-endo-substitution that is novel for phosphorus butterfly compounds and leads to a ca. 10° larger folding angle between the phosphorus triangles.

    8. Photocycloadditions of Benzvalene (pages 601–603)

      Prof. Dr. Manfred Christl and Dipl.-Chem. Max Braun

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906011

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      Benzvalene 1 can be photochemically converted into oxetanes if the triplet energy of the reaction partner is less than 65 kcal mol−1—examples are biacetyl ([RIGHTWARDS ARROW]2), benzil, and 1,4-benzoquinone. Cyclobutanes are formed as products as a result of [2 + 2]-cycloadditions with, e.g., naphthoquinone. 2-Acetylfuran and 1-acetylnaphthalene afforded [4 + 2]-cycloadducts. Hitherto, only isomerization to benzene, automerization, and the formation of radical cations were known as photochemical reactions of benzvalene.

    9. Synthesis and Structure of Digerma- and Distannacyclobutenes (pages 603–604)

      Prof. Dr. Adolf Krebs, Dipl.-Chem. Andrea Jacobsen-Bauer, Dr. Erhard Haupt, Prof. Dr. Michael Veith and Dr. Volker Huch

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The (crystalline) title compound 2 is the first distannacyclobutene. Other than the corresponding germanium compounds such as 1, 2 already dissociates reversibly into the starting compounds—cycloalkyne and stannanediyl—in solution at room temperature. This is apparently due to the fact that the energy of the C[BOND]Sn bond is markedly less than that of the C[BOND]Ge bond, and can no longer compensate the ring strain.

    10. Highly Reduced Porphyrins (pages 604–607)

      Dr. Robert Cosmo, Dipl.-Chem. Christian Kautz, Dipl.-Chem. Klaus Meerholz, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Heinze and Prof. Dr. Klaus Müllen

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906041

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A dodecaanion (!) is the final step of the reversible electrochemical reduction of 1. This indicates that a drastic increase in the electron storage capacity per total molecule is achievable by suitable linking of porphyrin units. The stepwise reduction of 1 (and an analogous monomer to the hexaanion) proceeds via one- and two-electron transfers.

    11. Revision and Modification of the Traditional Mechanism of C[BOND]H/C[BOND]C Activation by “Naked” Transition-Metal Ions (pages 607–609)

      Dipl.-Chem. Sigurd Karraß, Dipl.-Chem. Karsten Eller, Dipl.-Chem. Christian Schulze and Prof. Dr. Helmut Schwarz

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906071

      Why Fe-complexed n-propylamine decomposes into H2, NH3, ethylene and propylene in the mass spectrometer cannot be explained in terms of current concepts. Tandem MS experiments with deuteriated n-propylamine enable an explanation: H2, NH3 and propylene could be formed via an n-propyl-Fe-NH2 complex, which rearranges to the propene complex. For the formation of ethylene, a route via a four-membered FeNC2 complex and its conversion into an ethylene complex is possible.

    12. S4(CN)8, a Blue-Black High-Molecular Sulfur–Cyanogen Compound with 6π- and 8π-Electron Structural Elements (pages 609–610)

      Dipl.-Chem. Jörg Sundermeyer, Prof. Dr. Herbert W. Roesky and Dr. Mathias Noltemeyer

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Despite its formal antiaromaticity the six-membered ring in the title compound is planar. The reason for this could be the electron affinity of the thiadiazolyl moiety. 2 is formed from the bis(imidoyl chloride) 1, thiourea and pyridine in acetonitrile.

    13. Vinylcarbene Complexes of Titanocene (pages 610–611)

      Prof. Dr. Paul Binger, Dipl.-Chem. Patrik Müller, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Reinhard Benn and Dr. Richard Mynott

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906101

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The opening of cyclopropene rings with titanocene- and zirconocenephosphane complexes has made access to the corresponding vinylcarbene complexes, e.g. 1 and 2, surprisingly simple. η2-Cyclopropene complexes such as 3 obtained in the same way are not precursors of the carbene complexes. Titanocene-carbene complexes are important reagents; very few, however, have so far been isolated.

    14. Pentamethylcyclopentadienylmercury Chloride: An Organomercury Compound with Novel Battlement-like Structure (pages 611–613)

      Prof. Dr. Jörg Lorberth, Dr. Theo F. Berlitz and Prof. Dr. Werner Massa

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A polymer with the uniquely folded Hg2Cl2 double chain 1, the title compound, is formed in 74 % yield already at room temperature upon reaction of HgCl2 and K(C5Me5). The η1-bound C5Me5 rings surround the inorganic skeleton of the polymer as organic protective sheath. Compounds of the type R[BOND]Hg[BOND]X usually form linear-molecules, which assemble in the form of “normal” lattices.

    15. From 2,5-Dihydropyrazines to 2H-1,4-Diazepines and from Benzodihydroarenes to Benzocycloheptene Derivatives, Structural Variants of the Antidepressant Protriptyline (pages 613–614)

      Prof. Dr. Ulrich Schöllkopf and Dipl.-Chem. Joachim Mittendorf

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906131

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A hetero-norcaradiene-cycloheptatriene rearrangement and an unusually rapid transannular [1,5]-sigmatropic hydrogen shift are the key steps in the baseinduced ring expansion of the bislactim ethers 1 to the 2 H-1,4-diazepines 2. The ring expansion is also possible in the case of analogous all-carbon compounds and leads, for example, from dihydroanthracenes to novel structural variants of the antidepressant protriptyline such as 3. Examples for R1[BOND]R3: H, Me, OMe, Ph, CH2Ph.

    16. Total Enantiospecific Synthesis of (9S)- and (9R)-9-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid (9-HETE) Methyl Ester (pages 614–616)

      Dr. Michèle Saniere, Dr. Yves Le Merrer, Brigitte Barbe, Thierry Koscielniak, Jacques Dumas, Dr. Dominique Micas-Languin and Prof. Dr. Jean-Claude Depezay

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906141

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      The protected α-hydroxyaldehydes (S)-1 and (R)-1 are key intermediates en route to the title compounds. The novel synthesis from D-mannitol makes both enantiomers of 9-HETE readily accessible (X = PhCO).

    17. Pep5: Structure Elucidation of a Large Lantibiotic (pages 616–619)

      Dipl.-Chem. Roland Kellner, Prof. Dr. Günther Jung, Michaela Josten, Dipl.-Biochem. Cortina Kaletta, Prof. Dr. Karl-Dieter Entian and Prof. Dr. Hans-Georg Sahl

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906161

      Lantibiotics are peptide antibiotics which contain lanthionine. Pep 5, a strongly basic compound, is produced from Staphylococcus epidermidis 5 by ribosomal synthesis of a precursor peptide and post-translational modification. The antibiotic activity of Pep 5 rests on the formation of strain-dependent pores in bacterial membranes. Pep 5 is the hitherto largest lantibiotic (Mr = 3488). It is N-terminally blocked by a 2-oxobutyryl residue and contains, besides 25 protein amino acids, dehydrobutyrine (2), meso-lanthionine (2) and 3-methyllanthionine (1). Automatic Edman degradation, mass spectrometry of enzymatically obtained fragments and chemical derivatization gave a 34-peptide sequence with three sulfide rings (lanthionine = S(CH2[BOND]CHNH2[BOND]COOH)2).

    18. Synthesis of a Rigid Electron-Donor/Acceptor Compound–Evidence for Intramolecular Charge Separation (pages 619–620)

      Dr. Hans Heitele, Dr. Peter Finckh and Prof. Dr. Maria Elisabeth Michel-Beyerle

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906191

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rapid, intramolecular electron transfer as a result of the electronic excitation of the naphthylene moiety of 1 follows from a comparison of the stationary fluorescence spectra of 1 and the reference compound 2 in hexane and methanol. The lower limit of the electron transfer rate in 1 was estimated to be 2.5 × 109 s−1 and the free enthalpy of the electron transfer in methanol to be −0.9 eV

    19. [Bis(diisopropylamino)phosphino]trimethylsilylcarbene: A Stable Nucleophilic Carbene (pages 621–622)

      Alai Igau, Dr. Antoine Baceiredo, Dr. Georges Trinquier and Dr. Guy Bertrand

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906211

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      R2P̈-C̈-X or R2P [DOUBLE BOND] C-X or R2P[TRIPLE BOND]C-X—which form best describes the activity of the title compound 1? On the basis of its reactions with Me3SiCl, Me3SiN3 and DMSO as well as NMR data, 1 was hitherto regarded as a species with PC multibonding. That 1 is rather a carbene, could now be deduced, inter alia, from the addition of electron deficient alkenes ([RIGHTWARDS ARROW]2) and tert-butyl isocyanide ([RIGHTWARDS ARROW]3) (R=iPr2N, X = SiMe3).

    20. catena-Poly[bis-μ-(o-oxyphenyleneoxy)silicon]: Crystal Structure of the Orthosilicate of Catechol (pages 623–624)

      Dr. Wolfgang Hönle, Dr. Urszula Dettlaff-Weglikowska, Dr. Leonard Walz and Prof. Dr. Hans Georg von Schnering

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906231

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      The title compound 1, which is of special interest because of the postulated square planar SiO4 coordination, forms one-dimensional infinite polymers with tetrahedrally bound silicon. Both ligands act as bridging functions in the catena structure. The polymer contains ten-membered C4O4Si2 rings.

    21. Chain Complexes with Eleven Metal Atoms (pages 624–626)

      Simon J. Davies, Dr. Judith A. K. Howard, Rupert J. Musgrove and Prof. Dr. F. Gordon A. Stone

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906241

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The linear Pt6W3Mo2 cluster 2 was obtained from the M3 complex 1 in a sequential manner using a rational procedure involving successive reaction with Pt(cod) and W [TRIPLE BOND] CR or Mo [TRIPLE BOND] CR as appropriate (R = p-tolyl). The structure of 2 was characterized.

    22. Chromatographic Separation of the Excess Enantiomer under Achiral Conditions (pages 626–627)

      Prof. Dr. Rudolf Matusch and Dr. Carsten Coors

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906261

      The excess enantiomer can be separated chromatographically without difficulty from mixtures of enantiomers in the ratio a: b (a ≠ b), as are usually formed in enantioselective syntheses. This is possible on achiral stationary phases and with achiral mobile phases, but only in utilizable amounts if both homochiral as well as heterochiral associates are formed in solution. These associates are diastereomeric. Hence, the stationary phase is of decisive importance. On aminopropyl silica gel the excess entiomer is eluted first, then the racemate.

    23. Double Stereodifferentiation in the Formation of Isotactic Polypropylene at Chiral (C5H4CHMePh)2ZrCl2/Methylalumoxane Catalysts (pages 628–629)

      Prof. Dr. Gerhard Erker, Dipl.-Chem. Rainer Nolte, Dr. Yi-Hung Tsay and Prof. Dr. Carl Krüger

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906281

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      The chirality of the transition metal complex and of the end of the growing chain promote the formation of block polymers of isotactic polypropylenes during the polymerization of propene at rac-1/methylalumoxane catalysts. If, on the other hand, rac-1 is replaced by meso-1, only one kind of isotactic polypropylene is obtained (chain end control).

    24. Dimeric [Cp2Zr(CH2O)], a Novel (η2-Formaldehyde)metal Complex from Carbon Monoxide (pages 630–631)

      Prof. Dr. Gerhard Erker, Dipl.-Chem. Ursula Hoffmann, Dipl.-Chem. Roland Zwettler, Dr. Peter Betz and Prof. Dr. Carl Krüger

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906301

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      Hydrozirconization of CO with 1 and reaction of the primary products with methyllithium affords 2, a dimeric formaldehyde complex with two metallaoxirane units. 2 reacts with carbonyl complexes with opening of the Zr[BOND]C bond, and with diispropylaluminum hydride to form the insertion product 3.

  3. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Correspondences
    6. Editorial Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Panel Discussion
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Book Review: Organolithium Methods. (Series: Best Synthetic Methods.) By B. J. Wakefield (page 632)

      Hans-Ulrich Reissig

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906321

    2. Book Review: The Bioinorganic Chemistry of Nickel. Edited by J. R. Lancaster, Jr (pages 632–633)

      Joan Selverstone Valentine

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906322

    3. Book Review: Math/Chem/Comp 1987. Edited by R. C. Lacher (pages 633–634)

      Werner Gans

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906331

  4. Correspondences

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Correspondences
    6. Editorial Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Panel Discussion
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. One Pioneer or Several Pioneers? The Discovery of Noble-Gas Compounds (page 636)

      Prof. P. Laszlo and Prof. G. J. Schrobilgen

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906361

  5. Editorial Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Correspondences
    6. Editorial Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Panel Discussion
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Materials Research—Current Issues and Future Directions (pages 638–639)

      Dr. John W. Collette and Dr. Joel S. Miller

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906381

      Editorial Essay: Technological advances in Europe and the USA which culminated, 50 years ago, in the commercialization of Nylon opened the way for the full scale development of synthetic materials. The Advanced Materials Conference held in Wilmington, Delaware, USA, in October 1988 as part of this 50th anniversary celebration, covered a wide spectrum of issues in materials science. John Collette and Joel Miller, organizers of the conference, introduce a series of reviews based on the lectures which took place.

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Correspondences
    6. Editorial Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Panel Discussion
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Materials Issues in Electronic Systems (pages 640–643)

      Dr. David W. McCall

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906401

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      Review: The manufacture and use of electronic systems involves an enormous amount of materials engineering work. David McCall surveys the various technologies needed to produce electronics components (see figure) and takes a look at possible future developments in this fascinating area.

    2. Materials Processing—a Key Factor (pages 644–649)

      Prof. Dr. Ing. Walter Michaeli

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906441

      Review: Critical changes in the properties of materials due to varying processing conditions are the driving force behind the attempt to understand and control processing effects. Walter Michaeli uses the processing of polymers to emphasize the factors important in directing the design and processing of materials and the advantages of the integration of computers into development systems.

    3. The Kevlar Story—an Advanced Materials Case Study (pages 649–654)

      Dr. David Tanner, Dr. James A. Fitzgerald and Dr. Brian R. Phillips

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906491

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      Review: The need for a fiber with the heat resistance of asbestos and the stiffness of glass led to the development of Kevlar which has a molecular orientation parallel to the fiber axis (see figure). Brian Phillips et al. trace the many faceted course of the development of Kevlar from the initial scientific discovery to the opening of a 45 million lb/yr production plant.

    4. Aerospace Materials Research Opportunities (pages 655–662)

      Dr. Michael Salkind

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906551

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      Review: Materials used in the aerospace industry must have unique combinations of properties. Michael Salkind reviews the progress made in ceramics, polymers, alloys and composites and emphasizes the multidisciplinary approach which has led to success.

    5. Challenges in Materials for Health Care Applications (pages 662–667)

      Prof. David F. Williams

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906621

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      Review: The successful replacement of complex natural tissues (see figure) by synthetic materials is dependent on many factors. Bio-compatibility, corrosion and wear, and inter-facing are just some of the aspects reviewed by David Williams who also gives a view of future developments in biomaterials.

  7. Panel Discussion

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Correspondences
    6. Editorial Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Panel Discussion
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Improving Effectiveness in Materials Research (pages 667–669)

      Prof. Gerhard Wegner

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906671

      Panel Discussion: “Educate and cooperate” was the general message which came from the discussion of future trends in materials science during the meeting in Wilmington Delaware. Gerhard Wegner gives a European view of the proceedings, pointing out current trends and future aims in both the teaching of materials science and in the development and production of new materials.

  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Correspondences
    6. Editorial Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Panel Discussion
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Book Review: Electrons in Solids: An Introductory Survey. By R. H. Bube (pages 671–672)

      Helmut Büttner

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906711

    2. Book Review: Rubberlike Elasticity—A Molecular Primer. By J. E. Mark and B. Erman (page 673)

      Markus Antonietti

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906731

  9. Conference Calendar

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Correspondences
    6. Editorial Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Panel Discussion
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Conference Calendar
    1. Conference Calendar (pages 674–676)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198906741

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