Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 28 Issue 7

July 1989

Volume 28, Issue 7

Pages 829–968

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 7/1989)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198908291

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover illustration shows the structure of the ascorbate oxidase from zucchini. It belongs to the group of blue oxidases and is the very first oxidase whose structure could be elucidated. Its more than 500 amino acid residues are folded into three domains, shown here as ribbons in violet, green-yellow, and blue. A type-l-copper (Cu5), which is reduced by the substrate, and a novel trinuclear complex, which contains eight histidine ligands and serves as an oxygen-binding and electron storage site, act as redox centers. The isolated Cub atom has no functional significance. The redox centers and the electron pathway are located inside the protein and are far removed from bulk water. Further details on the structural basis of light energy and electron transfer in biology are reported on by R. Huber in his Nobel lecture on page 848.

    2. Graphical Abstract (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 7/1989)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198908292

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Biomaterials Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. The Photosynthetic Reaction Center from the Purple Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis (Nobel Lecture) (pages 829–847)

      Prof. Dr. Johann Deisenhofer and Prof. Dr. Hartmut Michel

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198908293

      Solar energy and its role as the energetic basis of terrestial life continue to attract interest now as ever - and not only in connection with oil crises and the ozone hole! How are light energy and electrons transferred in Nature? Which chemical compounds are required for this purpose? What relationships exist between structure and function? Does the photosynthetic reaction center of bacteria correspond to that of plants? Answers to these and further questions have been found by Robert Huber, Johann Deisenhofer and Hartmut Michel through the extremely meticulous crystallization and X-ray structure analysis of pigment protein systems, for which the three authors were awarded the 1988 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    2. A Structural Basis of Light Energy and Electron Transfer in Biology (Nobel Lecture) (pages 848–869)

      Prof. Dr. Robert Huber

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198908481

      Solar energy and its role as the energetic basis of terrestial life continue to attract interest now as ever – and not only in connection with oil crises and the ozone hole! How are light energy and electrons transferred in Nature? Which chemical compounds are required for this purpose? What relationships exist between structure and function? Does the photosynthetic reaction center of bacteria correspond to that of plants? Answers to these and further questions have been found by Robert Huber, Johann Deisenhofer and Hartmut Michel through the extremely meticulous crystallization and X-ray structure analysis of pigment protein systems, for which the three authors were awarded the 1988 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    3. The Purine Path to Chemotherapy (Nobel Lecture) (pages 870–878)

      Prof. Gertrude B. Elion

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198908701

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Purine and pyrimidine derivatives acting as nucleic base antagonists and inhibitors of dihydrofolate-reductase(DHFR), which is an essential enzyme for nuclei acid synthesis in vivo, have opened up access to the chemotherapy of cancer, particularly leukemia, to immunosuppression, and to the treatment of gout and virus diseases. Examples from the Nobel lectures of Gertrude Elion and George Hitchings are the clinically extremely important antiviral agent acyclovir 1 (purine derivative) and the DHFR inhibitor trimetrexate 2 (pyrimidine derivative).

    4. Selective Inhibitors of Dihydrofolate Reductase (Nobel Lecture) (pages 879–885)

      Prof. George H. Hitchings Jr.

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198908791

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Purine and pyrimidine derivatives acting as nucleic base antagonists and inhibitors of dihydrofolate-reductase(DHFR), which is an essential enzyme for nuclei acid synthesis in vivo, have opened up access to the chemotherapy of cancer, particularly leukemia, to immunosuppression, and to the treatment of gout and virus diseases. Examples from the Nobel lectures of Gertrude Elion and George Hitchings are the clinically extremely important antiviral agent acyclovir 1 (purine derivative) and the DHFR inhibitor trimetrexate 2 (pyrimidine derivative).

    5. Drugs from Emasculated Hormones: The Principle of Syntopic Antagonism (Nobel Lecture) (pages 886–894)

      Prof. Sir James W. Black

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198908861

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      Hormones as prototypes in the development of drugs; this was the theme of the lecture by the third recipient of the 1988 Nobel Prize in Medicine, whose research led to compounds such as propranolol 1, derived from adrenaline andused as a drug against angina pectoris illnesses, and burimamide 2, derived from histamine, used against increased gastric secretion, the cause of stomach and duodenal ulcers.

  2. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Biomaterials Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. The First PE-Spectroscopic Investigations of Lithium, Sodium, and Potassium tert-Butoxide (pages 895–896)

      Prof. Dr. Manfred Braun, Dipl.-Chem. Delia Waldmüller and Dr. Bernhard Mayer

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198908951

      It is alway profitable to try and find out more about classical reagents in organic synthesis. The readily sublimable tert-butoxides of lithium, sodium and potassium have therefore been investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy at 150–180°C in the gaseous state, in which they are present as oligomeric aggregates. According to MNDO calculations the degeneracy of the HOMO of monomeric LiOC(CH3)3 is lifted during transition to the dimes and hexamer, as is also demonstrated in the PE spectrum of the lithium tert-butoxide vapor consisting of hexamers.

    2. Non-Chelate-Controlled Addition of 1-Bromo-1-lithio-1-alkenes to O-Protected Lactaldehydes (pages 896–898)

      Prof. Dr. Manfred Braun and Dipl.-Chem. Hellmut Mahler

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198908961

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      Non-chelate control is generally difficult to realize. With the carbenoid 2 it has now been possible for the first time to carry out such an addition (85 % de) of an organolithium compound to the protected lactaldehyde (S)-1. A chiral 1 bromo-l-lithio-l-alkene increases the diastereoselectivity to 95 % de. The product 4 separated the formal after dehalogenation and ozonolysis is formed by the formal addition of ⊖CH2OH.

    3. Dimethyldioxasilirane (pages 898–900)

      Dipl.-Chem. Andreas Patyk, Dr. Wolfram Sander, Dipl.-Chem. Jürgen Gauss and Prof. Dr. Dieter Cremer

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198908981

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The title compound 2 contains the first SiO2 three-membered ring. 2 is formed upon thermal reaction of dimethylsilanediyl 1 with molecular oxygen in an argon matrix. The IR bands were assigned by isotopic labeling and comparison with the results of ab initio calculations. Upon irradiation with visible light, 2 rearranges into the sila ester 3; thus, 2 behaves like its carbon analogues.

    4. Polycyclic Polyphosphorus Hydrocarbons (pages 900–902)

      Dipl.-Chem. Dongqi Hu, Dipl.-Chem. Hartmut Schäufele, Dr. Hans Pritzkow and Dr. Ulrich Zenneck

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909001

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      There are apparently no set limits to the variety of phosphorus-carbon cage compounds: In the reaction of tBuC [TRIPLE BOND] P with (η4-1-methylnaphthalene)(η6-toluene)iron, aside from known complexes also the compounds 14 could be isolated. 4 is characterized by partial 1,3-diphosphaallyl and 2-phosphaallyl structures.

    5. The Radical Cation of N,N′-Tetramethylene-syn-1,6:8,13-diimino[14]annulene. An Experimental Study of the N[BOND]N Three-Electron σ Bond (pages 902–904)

      Prof. Dr. Fabian Gerson, Dr. Georg Gescheidt, Urs Buser, Prof. Dr. Emanuel Vogel, Dr. Johann Lex, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Margareta Zehnder and Dr. Andreas Riesen

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The direct detection of an N[BOND]N three-electron σ-bond in the system 1/1ClOmath image was possible by X-ray structure analysis. The N[BOND]N distance of 256.0 pm in 1 is shortened to 218.9 pm in the radical cation 1. Hitherto, such a detection in this way was only possible in the case of the radical cations of 1,6-diazabicyclo[4.4.4]tetradecane and N,N″-trimethylene-syn-1,6:8,13-diimino[14]annulene.

    6. Bis-Stilbene Systems: Reduction to the Tetraanions (pages 904–906)

      Dipl.-Chem. Rainer Schenk, Dipl.-Chem. Joachim Hucker, Prof. Dr. Henning Hopf, Dipl.-Chem. Hans-Joachim Räder and Prof. Dr. Klaus Müllen

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909041

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fourfold negatively charged polyene chains were obtained by reduction of the title compounds 1–3 with alkali metals and investigated with regard to charge storage capacity and minimization of coulomb repulsion. In the novel, expanded π-systems 1–3 the stilbene subunits are coupled in sterically and electronically different ways.

    7. Radical Tri- and Pentaanions of Benzenedi- and Benzenetriglyoxylate Thioesters (pages 906–908)

      Dr. Andrzej Sawluk and Prof. Dr. Jürgen Voß

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909061

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Novel persistent radical oligoanions such as 1 have been obtained from benzene thiodiglyoxylates. In the new species the unpaired electron is localized predominantly in one of the α-oxo-thioester groups; the doubly charged functional group is turned out of the plane of the benzene ring on the ESR time scale.

    8. The Mechanism of the Dötz Reaction: Chromacyclobutenes by Alkyne–Carbene Coupling? (pages 908–910)

      Prof. Dr. Peter Hofmann and Dipl.-Chem. Martin Hämmerle

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chromacyclobutenes 2, which have been postulated as intermediates on several occasions, are unrealistic structures with incomplete electron shells and high energy. According to model calculations vinylcarbene complexes 3/4 are much more stable isomers and can be formed almost without activation energy from alkyne-carbene complexes 1. The different modes of coordination of the structure continuum 1–6 can be interpreted and predicted as a function of the metal complex MLn.

    9. Water Elimination from Phosphorus–Oxygen Compounds: The Formation of 2-Phosphapropene by Thermolysis of Dimethylphosphane Oxide (pages 911–912)

      Prof. Dr. Hans Bock and Dipl.-Chem. Martin Bankmann

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cleavage of the P [DOUBLE BOND] O bond in the title reaction is an unusual finding – this bond, however, is still generally considered as energetically preferred. The course of the reaction is explained on the basis of an MNDO energy hypersurface by entropy-favored dissipation of the activation energy stored in the “chemically activated” isomerization intermediate (H3C)2P[BOND]OH.

    10. Amides Nonplanar Solely by C[BOND]N Bond Rotation (pages 912–914)

      Prof. Terrence J. Collins and José M. Workman

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909121

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dunitz parametrization of the distortion of the bisamido ligands in the octahedrally coordinated Co-complex 1 indicated that the C[BOND]N bond in both amide groups is strongly twisted (15 and 17°, resp.). Surprisingly, however, no pyramidalization takes place at the amide C and N atoms.

    11. Induction of Liquid Crystalline Phases: Formation of Discotic Systems by Doping Amorphous Polymers with Electron Acceptors (pages 914–918)

      Prof. Dr. Helmut Ringsdorf, Dipl.-Chem. Renate Wüstefeld, Dipl.-Chem. Elfriede Zerta, Dipl.-Phys. Martina Ebert and Prof. Dr. Joachim H. Wendorff

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909141

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      Liquid crystalline behavior and molecular miscibility – in amorphous discoid polymers, and mixtures thereof, can both be induced by CT interactions with a low molecular disk-shaped electron acceptor such as trinitrofluorenone (TNF). The properties of these induced discotic phases can be varied easily and over a wide range by choice of polymer type, electron acceptor, and mixing ratio.

    12. Pentacoordinated Elements of the 4th Main Group with Four Organic Residues (pages 918–920)

      Prof. Dr. Bernd Wrackmeyer, Dipl.-Chem. Klaus Horchler, Prof. Dr. Roland Köster, Günter Seidel and Dr. Dieter Schlosser

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909181

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      Ideal prerequisites for the investigation of intramolecular Si(Sn,Pb)[BOND]N interactions are provided by the aminoborates 2, M [BOND] Si, Sn, Pb, which are accessible from the (E)-alkenylboranes 1 by reaction with NaNH2 and KNH2. In coordinating solvents or in the presence of crown ethers M′ can be separated from the anion, and the free NH2 group then attacks at the Si, Sn or Pb atom with formation of a five-membered ring species, as has been confirmed by NMR findings.

    13. 1,3,5-Trithia-2,4,6-triazapentalenyl — a Stable Sulfur-Nitrogen Radical (pages 920–921)

      Dr. Gotthelf Wolmershäuser and Dipl.-Chem. Rudolf Johann

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909201

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The title compound is of interest as a likely candidate for the synthesis of conductive systems, l, a persistent radical which is arranged in stacks in the solid state, was obtained in a multistep synthesis. Between the stacks there are weak S … S interactions, whereas within the stack there is no mentionable interaction.

    14. Amide Bond Scission via Bifunctional Activation with Bimetallic Porphyrin Systems with Two Different Metal Centers (pages 921–922)

      Prof. Dr. Yasuhiro Aoyama, Tadahiro Motomura and Prof. Dr. Hisanobu Ogoshi

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909211

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      Multicenter interactions play an important role in biomimetic catalysts and receptors. It has now been possible to develop a RhIIIAgI system which accelerates the methanolysis of p-nitroacetanilide (stoichiometrically) and the transesterification of ethyl acetate with methanol (catalytically). 1 shows the double activation in the intermediary adduct.

    15. Agostic-type Gold Ligand and Incipient μ3-PPh2 Coordination in the Au2Pt2P6 “Hammock” Skeleton of the Cluster [Au2Pt2(μ-PPh2)2(PPh3)4][PF6]2 (pages 923–925)

      Dr. Robert Bender, Dr. Pierre Braunstein, Dr. Alain Dedieu and Prof. Yves Dusausoy

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909231

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Not only bonds between Au and Pt but also between Au and the Ph2P bridge ligands characterize the structure of 2, which is formed in ca. 80 % yield upon reaction of two equivalents of [Au(PPh3)] with 1 in CH2Cl2.

    16. Regiochemistry of the Intramolecular [2 + 2]-Photocycloaddition of Cyclohexenone to Vinyl Ethers (pages 925–927)

      Dr. Evelyn Fischer and Prof. Dr. Rolf Gleiter

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909251

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      What influence have chain length and polarization of the vinyl ether double bond on the title reaction? This problem has been studied with the compounds 1–3. With chains of three and four methylene groups, the different polarization only influences the quantum yield; exclusively head-to-head products are formed. With two methylene groups, the polarization also influences the regiochemistry.

    17. Oxidative Fluorination of Arenes** (pages 927–928)

      Jan H. H. Meurs, David W. Sopher and Wolf Eilenberg

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909271

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluorophenols such as 3 with interesting substitution patterns can be obtained by oxidation of the phenols 1 in an HF/base mixture to 2 and then further reaction with nucleophiles. HF/base mixtures can also be used for the electrochemical oxidative fluorination of benzene-like arenes.

    18. Synthesis of (S,S)-Diisotyrosine and Its Incorporation in an Ansa Tripeptide (pages 929–930)

      Prof. Dr. Ulrich Schmidt, Dipl.-Chem. Regina Meyer, Dipl.-Chem. Volker Leitenberger and Dr. Albrecht Lieberknecht

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909291

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      The characteristic building block of the strongly antibacterial ansa tripeptides WS-43078 A and B is diisotyrosine 1. Etherated 1, containing four differentiated amino and carboxy protecting groups, could be obtained by stepwise enantioselective and diastereoselective synthesis (ee and de > 99 %). The ansa tripeptide 2 was synthesized as model of the natural product. The ring closure was accomplished in 80 % yield via the linear pentafluorophenyl ester — independently of on which “side” the additional amino acid had been incorporated.

    19. Direct Observation of Ground State Splitting in the Chromium(III) Acetate Trimer by Inelastic Neutron Scattering (pages 930–931)

      Dr. Upali A. Jayasooriya, Dr. Roderick D. Cannon, Dr. Ross P. White and Dr. Gordon J. Kearley

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909301

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      Although the X-ray Crystal structure analysis indicated an equilateral Crmath image triangle in the complex cation 1 of [Cr3O(O2CCH3)6(OH2)3]Cl · 5 H2O, spectroscopic findings and magnetic parameters are consistent with a distortion of the symmetry. The symmetry lowering should result in a splitting of the electronic ground state into two levels, a presumption which has already long been discussed for such systems and has now been demonstrated directly for the first time by inelastic neutron scattering.

  3. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Biomaterials Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Book Review: Combination Effects in Chemical Carcinogenesis. By D. Schmähl (pages 931–932)

      David B. Clayson

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909311

    2. Book Review: Chemiluminescence. By A. K. Campbell (page 933)

      David Mendenhall

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909331

    3. Book Review: Principles of Organometallic Chemistry. 2nd Edition. By P. Powell (pages 934–935)

      Ulrich Schubert

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909341

    4. Book Review: Surfactant Science and Technology. By D. Myers (page 936)

      Gerhard Platz

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909361

  4. Editorial Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Biomaterials Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. The European Materials Research Society (E-MRS) (pages 938–939)

      Prof. Dr. Eberhard F. Krimmel

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909381

      Editorial Essay: Since its birth in 1986, the European MRS has been going from strength to strength. Regular interdisciplinary meetings are held and educational programs as well as European Research Networks are supported, these activities making up the basis of a thriving society. In this month's Editorial Essay a former secretary of the E-MRS traces the society's early development, assesses its current position and looks forward to its undoubtedly bright future.

  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Biomaterials Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Dichroic Dyes and Liquid Crystalline Side Chain Polymers (pages 940–946)

      Dr. Hans-Werner Schmidt

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909401

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      Review: The potential of LC side chain polymers is based on the unique combination of specific polymer properties with the anisotropic physical properties of conventional low molar mass liquid crystals. When dichroic dyes are incorporated as guests into the LC phases their molecular orientation can be controlled forming the basis of the electrooptical effect used for example in displays.

    2. Production and Application of Rapidly Quenched Materials (pages 947–950)

      Prof. Dr. Hans Warlimont

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909471

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      Review: Amorphous metals produced by rapid quenching from the melt can be formed into ribbons (see figure) and can be greatly useful for speciality magnetic applications. In transformers, for example, power loss is greatly reduced when amorphous core transformers are used. This short review gives a taste of what can be achieved using Rapid Solidification Technology.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Biomaterials Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Structure of Anodic Oxide Coatings on Aluminum (pages 951–953)

      Prof. Dr. Rüdiger Kniep, Dr. Peter Lamparter and Prof. Dr. Siegfried Steeb

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909511

      Communication: The structure of the remarkably uniform array of pores in surface coatings on aluminum has been investigated using X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. The almost hexagonally shaped cells make the films of interest for application in the field of synthetic membranes and as supports for active materials.

    2. Superconductivity at 7.5 K and Ambient Pressure in Polycrystalline Pressed Samples of βp-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 (pages 953–955)

      Prof. Dr. Dieter Schweitzer, Dipl. Phys. Emil Gogu, Dr. Hans Grimm, Dipl. Phys. Siegfried Kahlich and Prof. Dr. Heimo J. Keller

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909531

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      Communication: Polycrystalline pressed samples of β-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 exhibit bulk superconductivity, zero resistivity being observed at 3.2 K (see figure) a transition temperature which is surprisingly higher than that observed for single crystals of the same compound.

  7. Biomaterials Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Biomaterials Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Materials for Biomedical Applications—High Long-Term Success Rates Might Pose New Problems (pages 956–958)

      Prof. Günther Heimke

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909561

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      Biomaterials Highlights II: The increasing functional lifetime of modern implants has been due to engineering successes in utilizing new materials. However, along with this progress has come the concern that some of these materials are not as biologically inert as expected and systemic damage may in some cases be caused. Second article in a quarterly series.

  8. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Biomaterials Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Magnetism in Washington (pages 958–959)

      Dr. Frans Greidanus

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909581

    2. Liquid Crystals in Schladming (pages 959–961)

      Prof. Peter Laggner

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909591

    3. Ferromagnetic and High Spin Molecular Based Materials in Dallas (pages 961–962)

      Dr. Joel S. Miller and Prof. Dennis A. Dougherty

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909611

  9. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Biomaterials Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Book Review: Zeolite Molecular Sieves. By A. Dyer (page 964)

      John M. Thomas

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909641

    2. Book Review: Problem-Solving with Microbeam Analysis. By K. Kiss (pages 964–965)

      Reinhold Klockenkämper

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909642

  10. Conference Calendar

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Communications
    4. Book Reviews
    5. Editorial Essay
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Biomaterials Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Conference Calendar
    1. Conference Calendar (pages 965–968)

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.198909651

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