Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 2

February 3, 1995

Volume 34, Issue 2

Pages 131–243

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 2/1995)

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501291

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the structure, generated by molecular mechanics calculations, of a chromophoric self-assembled superlattice with a very large second-order nonlinear optical response (blue, benzylic coupling layer; green: stilbazolium chromophore layer with high polarizability: violet and yellow: siloxane capping layer: white spheres: iodide counterions). The synthesis and properties of the associated real systems are one of the themes of the review by T. J. Marks and M. A. Ratner on molecule-based assemblies with nonlinear optical properties on pp. 155ff. This article complements excellently that by N. J. Long on the “organometallic route” to NLO materials in the previous issue.

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Communications
    5. Corrigenda
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Disulfide-Reductase Inhibitors as Chemotherapeutic Agents: The Design of Drugs for Trypanosomiasis and Malaria (pages 141–154)

      Prof. Dr. R. Heiner Schirmer, Dr. Joachim G. Müller and Priv.-Doz. R. Luise Krauth-Siegel

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501411

      The designation “scourge of mankind” has been attached to parasitic infections such as Chagas' heart disease, sleeping sickness, and malaria. In many countries of the world they lead to human misery and massive socio-medical problems. Several approaches are possible for the design of chemotherapeutic agents that can interfere as enzyme inhibitors with the metabolism of parasites. For instance, structural motifs of an enzyme and its natural substrates can be expolited to control the kinetics of the enzyme–substrate interactions, and thus substrate analogues can influence the enzyme as inhibitors at various stages of the catalytic cycle. The results may be irreversible inhibition, destabilization of the enzyme's structure, or an alteration of its substrate specificity. Glutathione reductase and trypanothione reductase are target enzymes for this strategy of drug design in the fight against tropical diseases.

    2. Design, Synthesis, and Properties of Molecule-Based Assemblies with Large Second-Order Optical Nonlinearities (pages 155–173)

      Prof. Tobin J. Marks and Prof. Mark A. Ratner

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501551

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      The rational construction of supramolecular assemblies with preordained collective properties is an important theme in many areas of contemporary chemistry. The advances made in this respect with regard to polymeric NLO materials, and what problems must still be addressed before technologically viable NLO building blocks become readily available, are surveyed by the authors of this review. Superlattices of the type shown schematically on the right should be among the most promising materials.

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Communications
    5. Corrigenda
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Peptide Ligases—Tools for Peptide Synthesis (pages 175–177)

      Prof. Dr. Hans-Dieter Jakubke

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501751

      Since the ligation of peptide fragments in vivo is meaningless, no natural enzyme is capable of replacing chemical coupling methods, which have the danger of racemization in segment condensation. Native proteases and those altered by protein design as well as catalytic antibodies may serve as peptide ligases, as demonstrated recently with subtiligase in the chemoenzymatic synthesis of R Nase A.

    2. Catalytic Asymmetric C[BOND]C Bond Formation: New Enolato- and Organolithium Chemistry (pages 178–180)

      Dr. David J. Berrisford

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501781

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalytic and enantioselective are two new efficient processes for C[BOND]C bond formation developed from fundamental reactions of organolithium compounds. Koga et al. have achieved the benzylation of Li enolates in the presence of both chiral (L*) and achiral (L) ligands [Eq.(a)], and Denmark et al. describe the addition of RLi to aryl imines [Eq. (b)] with very good selectivities, R [DOUBLE BOND] Me, vinyl.

  3. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Communications
    5. Corrigenda
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Trace Analysis of the Radionuclides 90Sr and 89Sr in Environmental Samples I: Laser Mass Spectrometry (pages 181–183)

      Dipl.-Phys. Jörg Lantzsch, Bruce A. Bushaw, Prof. Dr. Günter Herrmann, Prof. Dr. Heinz-Jürgen Kluge, Dr. Ludwin Monz, Dipl.-Chem. Sabine Niess, Prof. Dr. Ernst W. Otten, Dipl.-Phys. Richard Schwalbach, Dipl.-Phys. Martin Schwarz, Dipl.-Phys. Judith Stenner, Dr. Norbert Trautmann, Dr. Klaus Walter, Dr. Klaus Wendt and Dipl.-Phys. Klaus Zimmer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501811

      Strontium-90 is one of the most poisonous radionuclides. Its toxicity results from its long half-life of 28.5 years and permanent deposition in the blood-forming bone system. Strontium-90 is formed in high yields during the nuclear fission of uranium-235 and plutonium-239. The classic analytical procedure for the determination of 90Sr, which relies on the β-radiation of the daughter nuclide yttrium-90, necessitates the chemical removal of all accompanying nuclides. This method requires the Sr/Y ratio to be at equilibrium which takes about two to three weeks to achieve—far too long for the analysis of acute contaminations. Three communications deal with new procedures for ultra-trace analysis using complex physical detection methods (resonance ionization and accelerator mass spectrometry) and high-performance separation techniques (high-performance ion chromatography, HPIC) are presented. In accordance with the strategies of the German Federal Ministry of the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety, precision methods are described for the determination of the strontium-90 content in aerosols. These techniques yield data for calculations of the spread of contaminants, which in turn yield results that can be verified in various samples with the aid of the novel fast detection method (HPIC with on-line detectors). The three analytical procedures are set up in a modular manner and can therefore be utilized in variable combinations. They also indicate the high level of refinement achieved by modern ultra-trace analyses.

    2. Trace Analysis of the Radionuclides 90Sr and 89Sr in Environmental Samples II: Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) (pages 183–186)

      Fatma Arslan, Martin Behrendt, Werner Ernst, Prof. Dr. Eberhard Finckh, Gunther Greb, Friedrich Gumbmann, Martin Haller, Stefan Hofmann, Ralf Karschnick, Matthias Klein, Wolfgang Kretschmer, Jochen Mackiol, Gerhard Morgenroth, Christian Pagels and Markus Schleicher

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501831

      Strontium-90 is one of the most poisonous radionuclides. Its toxicity results from its long half-life of 28.5 years and permanent deposition in the blood-forming bone system. Strontium-90 is formed in high yields during the nuclear fission of uranium-235 and plutonium-239. The classic analytical procedure for the determination of 90Sr, which relies on the β-radiation of the daughter nuclide yttrium-90, necessitates the chemical removal of all accompanying nuclides. This method requires the Sr/Y ratio to be at equilibrium which takes about two to three weeks to achieve—far too long for the analysis of acute contaminations. Three communications deal with new procedures for ultra-trace analysis using complex physical detection methods (resonance ionization and accelerator mass spectrometry) and high-performance separation techniques (high-performance ion chromatography, HPIC) are presented. In accordance with the strategies of the German Federal Ministry of the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety, precision methods are described for the determination of the strontium-90 content in aerosols. These techniques yield data for calculations of the spread of contaminants, which in turn yield results that can be verified in various samples with the aid of the novel fast detection method (HPIC with on-line detectors). The three analytical procedures are set up in a modular manner and can therefore be utilized in variable combinations. They also indicate the high level of refinement achieved by modern ultra-trace analyses.

    3. Trace Analysis of the Radionuclides 90Sr and 89Sr in Environmental Samples III: Development of a Fast Analytical Method (pages 186–189)

      Juan Alfaro, Thomas Apfel, Herbert Diercks, Prof. Dr. Arndt Knöchel, Rahul Sen Gupta and Klaus Tödter

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501861

      Strontium-90 is one of the most poisonous radionuclides. Its toxicity results from its long half-life of 28.5 years and permanent deposition in the blood-forming bone system. Strontium-90 is formed in high yields during the nuclear fission of uranium-235 and plutonium-239. The classic analytical procedure for the determination of 90Sr, which relies on the β-radiation of the daughter nuclide yttrium-90, necessitates the chemical removal of all accompanying nuclides. This method requires the Sr/Y ratio to be at equilibrium which takes about two to three weeks to achieve—far too long for the analysis of acute contaminations. Three communications deal with new procedures for ultra-trace analysis using complex physical detection methods (resonance ionization and accelerator mass spectrometry) and high-performance separation techniques (high-performance ion chromatography, HPIC) are presented. In accordance with the strategies of the German Federal Ministry of the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety, precision methods are described for the determination of the strontium-90 content in aerosols. These techniques yield data for calculations of the spread of contaminants, which in turn yield results that can be verified in various samples with the aid of the novel fast detection method (HPIC with on-line detectors). The three analytical procedures are set up in a modular manner and can therefore be utilized in variable combinations. They also indicate the high level of refinement achieved by modern ultra-trace analyses.

    4. Diastereoselective Coupling of Anodically Generated Radicals Bearing Chiral Amide Groups (pages 189–191)

      Dipl.-Chem. Bruno Klotz-Berendes, Prof. Dr. Hans J. Schäfer, Dr. Matthias Grehl and Dr. Roland Fröhlich

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501891

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By Kolbe electrolysis of auxiliary-substituted malonic acid derivatives 1 with co-acids 2 the first diasteroselective coupling yielding 3 was achieved in up to 86% de.

    5. A Rhodium-Mediated, Stepwise Trimerization of an Alkyne That Does Not Lead to a Benzene but Selectively to a Hexadienyne Derivative (pages 191–194)

      Prof. Dr. Helmut Werner, Dr. Martin Schäfer, Dr. Justin Wolf, Dr. Karl Peters and Prof. Dr. Hans Georg von Schnering

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501911

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The coupling of an alkynyl and a butadienyl unit at the rhodium center of 1 is the key step in the selective, stepwise trimerization of methyl propiolate HC[TRIPLE BOND]CR to hexadienyne 3 with [Rh(η2-O2CMe)(PiPr3)2] as a metal template. In MgCl2 in ether, this step occurs almost quantitatively, and the intermediates 1 and 2 were characterized by X-ray crystal structure analysis.

    6. Electrochemical Synthesis of a Redox-Active Polymer Based on Buckminsterfullerene Epoxide (pages 194–196)

      Milan Fedurco, David A. Costa, Prof. Alan L. Balch and Prof. W. Ronald Fawcett

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501941

      Under cathodic conditions a polymer film forms on an electrode when C60O is first reduced in the presence of Bu4NClO4 in toluene/acetonitrile and then oxidized. Films with thicknesses of up to 3 μm can be produced by repeated cyclic voltammetry. Evidence for ionic as well as electronic conductivity of this fullerene polymer is also provided.

    7. 9-Methoxystrobilurins—A Link Between Strobilurins and Oudemansins (pages 196–198)

      Dipl.-Biol. Silvia Zapf, Andreas Werle, Prof. Dr. Timm Anke, Dipl.-Chem. Dörte Klostermeyer, Dr. Bert Steffan and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Steglich

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501961

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      New (E)-β-methoxyacrylates, the antifungal compounds 9-methoxystrobilurins 1, have been discovered. Strobilurins are currently of great interest as lead structures for fungicides in crop protection.

    8. 2,4-Di-tert-butyl-1λ3,3λ3-diphosphinines: Targeted Synthesis at Iron(0) Centers and Oxidative Release (pages 198–201)

      Dipl.-Chem. Dieter Böhm, Dr. Falk Knoch, Dipl.-Chem. Susanne Kummer, Dipl.-Chem. Uwe Schmidt and Prof. Dr. Ulrich Zenneck

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199501981

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition of two molecules of a phosphaalkyne and one molecule of a terminal alkyne in the coordination sphere of iron(0) affords 1,3-diphosphinines regiospecifically [Eq.(a)]. The coordinated and the oxidatively released 1,3-diphosphinines have cyclic delocalized π systems and are thus not only novel heteroarenes, but also of interest as potential catalysts.

    9. Formation and Structures of New Metallo- and Metallapolysulfanes, [MSy]+ (y = 2−16) (pages 201–203)

      Prof. Ian Dance, Dr. Keith Fisher and Dr. Gary Willett

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the gas phase, sulfur and monopositive metal ions (Sc[BOND]Zn) react to form novel metallo- and metallapolysulfanes [MSy]+. The structures of these complexes were calculated by ab initio methods. The lowest energy structure of [Cu(cyclo-S12)]+, in which the octahedrally coordinated Cu+ ion is located in the center of the S12 cycle, is shown in the picture on the right.

    10. Formation of an Alkylperoxoiron(III) Complex during Oxidations Catalyzed by μ-Oxodiiron(III) Complexes (pages 203–205)

      Dr. Stéphane Ménage, Elizabeth C. Wilkinson, Prof. Lawrence Que Jr. and Prof. Marc Fontecave

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      UV/Vis, resonance Raman, and EPR spectroscopy served in characterizing the alkylperoxoiron(III) complex 2, an intermediate in the oxidation of alcohols R'OH with alkyl hydroperoxides ROOH catalyzed by μ-oxo complex 1. The results discussed may provide insight for studies of monooxygenases.

    11. A New Type of Trinuclear Oxoiron(III) Cluster (pages 205–207)

      Jean-Marc Vincent, Stéphane Ménage, Jean-Marc Latour, Azzedine Bousseksou, Jean-Pierre Tuchagues, André Decian and Prof. Marc Fontecave

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502051

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bent Fe3 chain in which the central Fe atom has two cis oxo bridges is the distinguishing feature of complex 1 (structure on the right). The resulting strong antiferromagnetic interactions between the metal atoms are evident in interesting magnetic and spectroscopic properties.

      • equation image
    12. Mutually Interpenetrating Sheets and Channels in the Extended Structure of [Cu(4,4′-bpy)Cl] (pages 207–209)

      Prof. O. M. Yaghi and Guangming Li

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bis-monodentate 4,4′-bipyridine ligands link μ2-chloro-bridged Cu1 dimers to form an extended structure containing channels that are of comparable size to those in some zeolites (drawing on the right; dark spheres, Cu; large shaded spheres, Cl).

    13. Investigation of Self-Assembled Supramolecular Species in Solution by IL-ESMS, a New Mass Spectrometric Technique (pages 209–213)

      Dr. Keith C. Russell, Dr. Emmanuelle Leize, Dr. Alain Van Dorsselaer and Prof. Dr. Jean-Marie Lehn

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502091

      Discrete neutral assemblies in solution can be studied with the analytical method described here. A prerequisite is that one of the components contains an ion-complexing site, for example a crown ether unit. When alkali metal ions are added, charged assemblies form, which can be examined by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESMS) without disruption of their hydrogen bonds. IL in the title stands for ion labeling.

    14. Gas-Phase Activation of Fluorocarbons by “Bare” and Coordinated Praseodymium Cations (pages 213–217)

      Dipl.-Chem. Christoph Heinemann, Dr. Norman Goldberg, Dr. Inis C. Tornieporth-Oetting, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Thomas M. Klapötke and Prof. Dr. Helmut Schwarz

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502131

      Rather than C[BOND]H or C[BOND]C bonds, Pr+ activates C[BOND]F bonds in the gas phase in a variety of aliphatic and aromatic fluorocarbons; PrF+ and PrO+ react analogously. This first general example of preferential C[BOND]F bond activation in the gas phase allows interesting conclusions to be drawn regarding the importance of 4f electrons for the reactivity of isolated lanthanide species. The existence of neutral PrF and PrF2 in the gas phase was also proven by neutralization–reionization mass spectrometry (NRMS).

    15. Free-Energy Profile for a Host-Accelerated Diels–Alder Reaction: The Sources of exo Selectivity (pages 217–219)

      Dr. Christopher J. Walter and Dr. Jeremy K. M. Sanders

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502171

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Simultaneous reduction of the activation energy for the exo reaction and increase of that for the endo reaction explain how a cyclic porphyrin trimer that can bind diene 1 and dienophile 2 in its cavity increases the exo selectivity of a Diels–Alder reaction and accelerates it dramatically.

    16. The Formation of a Mixed Organolithium Aggregate Li4R2nBu2 during the Heteroatom-Assisted Lithiation of 1,3-Bis(dimethylaminomethyl)-2,4,6-trimethylbenzene (R = 2,6-(CH2NMe2)2-3,5-Me2C6HCH2) (pages 219–222)

      Peter Wijkens, Ernout M. van Koten, Maurits D. Janssen, Dr. Johann T. B. H. Jastrzebski, Dr. Anthony L. Spek and Prof. Dr. Gerard van Koten

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502191

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      Lithiated 1 and unreacted n-butyllithium in a 2:2 ratio make up the title aggregate 2, which is formed in the reaction of 1 with two equivalents of n-butyllithium (shown below). Species such as 2 can be regarded as intermediates in heteroatom-facilitated lithiation reactions.

    17. Carbon[BOND]Carbon Bond Cleavage with Inversion of Configuration: Conversion of (R)-(+)-1-Methoxytetrafluoropropionic Acid to (S)-(−)-1,2,2,2-Tetrafluoroethyl Methyl Ether (pages 222–223)

      Dr. Keith Ramig, Linda Brockunier, Patrice W. Rafalko and Dr. Leonid A. Rozov

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502221

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nearly complete inversion of configuration is seen during decarboxylation of the potassium salt 1 of an α-chiral carboxylic acid to give ether 2. Since 2 is an intermediate in the synthesis of inhalational anesthetics, and its enantiomers may have different pharmacological profiles, the determination of the stereochemical outcome of this C[BOND]C bond cleavage is of particular interest.

    18. Investigations into the Targeted Design of Solids: Hydrothermal Synthesis and Structures of One-, Two-, and Three-Dimensional Phases of the Oxovanadium–Organodiphosphonate System (pages 223–226)

      Victoria Soghomonian, Qin Chen, Dr. Robert C. Haushalter and Prof. Jon Zubieta

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502231

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Depending on the tether length of the diphosphonate group, hydrothermal reactions of VCl4 with diphosphonic acids of the class (H2O3P)(CH2)n(PO3H2) in the presence of templating organic cations yield one-, two-, and three-dimensional framework structures of the V-O-RPOmath image system. The picture shows a section of the three-dimensional framework of [H3N(CH2)2NH3][(VO)4(OH)2(H2O)2{O3P(CH2)3PO3}2]·4H2O.

    19. Dimensional Reduction of Re6Se8Cl2: Sheets, Chains, and Discrete Clusters Composed of Chloride-Terminated [Re6Q8]2+ (Q [DOUBLE BOND] S, Se) Cores (pages 226–229)

      Jeffrey R. Long, Andrew S. Williamson and Prof. Richard H. Holm

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A general high-temperature approach to reducing the dimensionality of cluster frameworks is formulated and employed in deconstructing the two-dimensional Re6Se8Cl2 structure. The resulting new phases with [Re6Q8]2+ (Q [DOUBLE BOND] S, Se) cores exhibit two-dimensional [Re6Se8Cl3] sheets, one-dimensional [Re6Q8Cl4]2− chains, and [Re6Q8Cl6]4− clusters. The structures of these phases are presented along with that of Tl5Re6Se8Cl7 which contains the unprecedented molecular cluster [Re6Se8Cl6]4−1.

    20. Direct Observation of O[DOUBLE BOND]H Reductive Elimination from IrIII Complexes (pages 229–231)

      Ofer Blum and Prof. David Milstein

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502291

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Elimination of alcohols from the IrIII complexes 1 to give 2 is feasible and competes favorably with β-H elimination to give 3. This supports proposals that O[BOND]H reductive elimination is the product-forming step in industrially important processes such as CO hydrogenation and alcohol homologation. The ancillary π-donating chloride has a paramount role in this process. L [DOUBLE BOND] PEt3, PMe3.

    21. Does the Facile Inter- and Intramolecular C[BOND]H Bond Activation by Tp*–Rh Complexes Proceed via RhI or RhIII Intermediates? (pages 231–233)

      Dr. Pedro J. Pérez, Dr. Manuel L. Poveda and Prof. Dr. Ernesto Carmona

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502311

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The answer to the question in the title may well be Rh1. Although initial studies suggested a mechanism involving a RhIII species of type 2, the activation of the benzene C[BOND]H group by 3 now appears to proceed via the intermediate 1.

    22. LaI: An Unprecedented Binary Rare Earth Metal Monohalide with a NiAs-Type Structure (pages 233–235)

      Dr. James D. Martin and Prof. John D. Corbett

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502331

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The reduction of LaI3 with La metal at roughly 750°C proceeds via metallic LaI2 to LaI, the first halide with a hexagonal close-packed NiAs-type structure (projection along c shown on the right). This arrangement does not provide suitable interstitial sites for hydrogen atoms. The extreme c/a ratio (2.47) affords markedly strong La[BOND]La bonding in the a,b plane. Extended Hückel band calculations suggest that LaI is a strongly anisotropic metal.

    23. Molecular Recognition at an Interface: Binding of Monolayer-Anchored Ferrocenyl Groups by an Amphiphilic Calixarene Host (pages 235–237)

      Litao Zhang, Luis A. Godínez, Dr. Tianbao Lu, Prof. George W. Gokel and Prof. Angel E. Kaifer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502351

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An amphiphilic calix[6]arene host effectively binds to ferrocenyl groups covalently attached to a self-assembled monolayer on gold. Electrochemical evidence indicates that the calixarene binds the protruding ferrocenyl groups by including them in its lipophilic end (schematic representation below).

    24. Synthesis, Antitumor Activity, and Tolerability of Phospholipids Containing Nitrogen Homologues (pages 238–240)

      Dr. Jurij Stekar, Dr. Gerhard Nössner, Dr. Bernhard Kutscher, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Engel and Dr. Peter Hilgard

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502381

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Replacing the N atom with an As or P atom in antineoplastically active phospholipids 1 and 2 (Z [DOUBLE BOND] N) leads to homologous compounds (Z [DOUBLE BOND] As, P) that are equally effective against tumors and have fewer side effects than the N-containing phospholipids. This marks definite progress in cancer treatment with chemotherapeutically active phospholipids.

  4. Corrigenda

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Communications
    5. Corrigenda
    6. Book Reviews
    1. You have free access to this content
      Addenda (page 240)

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502401

  5. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Communications
    5. Corrigenda
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Book Review: Djerassi's Park: The Bourbaki Gambit. By C. Djerassi (pages 241–242)

      Henning Hopf and Andreas Plagens

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502411

    2. Book Review: Methods of Immunological Analysis (page 243)

      Karl-Heinz Glüsenkamp

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199502431

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