Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 22

December 1, 1995

Volume 34, Issue 22

Pages 2429–2565

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 22/1995)

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199524271

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the structure of Te8(VOCl)2 viewed along the one-dimensional strings of Temath image and VOClmath image ions (Te = green, CI = yellow, V = red, O = blue). From this perspective the impression of a stack of cubes for the Te partial structure is particularly pronounced. The structure of the new polycation can be derived from the α-polonium structure or can be seen as dimers of Temath image. The rigid framework of the math image[VOClmath image] ions certainly favors this unusual arrangement of partially oxidized Te atoms. Further details on the structure and one-pot synthesis from Te and VOCl3 are reported by J. Beck and G. Bock on p. 2559ff. (SCHAKAL graphics generated on an IBM Work Station, X-ray data collection with a STOE–IPS diffractometer).

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Correspondences
    5. Communications
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Synthetic Aspects of Metal-Catalyzed Oxidations of Amines and Related Reactions (pages 2443–2465)

      Prof. Dr. Shun-Ichi Murahashi

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199524431

      Simulating the reactions of enzymes is a challenge in organic synthesis. Enzymes, for example amine oxidases, flavoenzymes, and cytochrome P-450, are a tip from nature that oxidation reactions can be conducted with catalysts. Complexes of low-valent ruthenium are particularly suitable for synthetically useful conversions of amines, alcohols, and even hydrocarbons.

    2. Cyclopentadienyl-Free Organolanthanide Chemistry (pages 2466–2488)

      Prof. Dr. Frank T. Edelmann

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199524661

      Novel molecular structures and high catalytic activities make organolanthanide complexes fascinating objects of research. Whereas cyclopentadienyl derivatives have so far been the main focus of interest, today highly reactive lanthanide complexes are increasingly synthesized with other ligands. Low-coordinate dialkyllanthanide(II) compounds such as [Yb{C(SiMe3)3}2] had until very recently been considered impossible to isolate. The present review provides an overview of the recent developments in this rapidly expanding area of organometallic chemistry.

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Correspondences
    5. Communications
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Book Reviews
    1. New Surprises in Metal Carbonyl Chemistry (pages 2489–2491)

      Prof. Dr. John E. Ellis and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Beck

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199524891

      Carbonyl complexes of calcium, silicon, and uranium have been prepared and exactly characterized within the last two years—sensational discoveries if one considers that previously, binary carbonyls of main group elements and actinides were only detected at very low temperatures as matrix-isolated species. These exciting developments have again placed the spotlight on the rich and vital area of metal carbonyl chemistry.

    2. Sunlight-Damaged DNA Repaired with Sunlight (pages 2491–2494)

      Dr. Thomas Carell

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199524911

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Major protection systems developed by organisms to counter damaging environmental influences include both DNA repair processes and the immune system. The recently determined crystal structure of a repair enzyme, which reverses the photochemical dimerization of pyrimidine bases in DNA [Eq.(a)], offers, new insight into the structural requirements of one of the most widespread DNA repair processes.

  3. Correspondences

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Correspondences
    5. Communications
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Reactions of Neopentyl 2,2,2,-Trifluoroethanesulfonate (Tresylate) with Nucleophiles: A Model Study for the Coupling of Nucleophiles with Tresyl Agarose (page 2495)

      Prof. Dr. Herbert P. Jennissen

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199524951

      Is it prudent to compare homogeneous and heterogeneous phase reactions? One side of this discussion on the reactivity of certain tresylates to nucleophiles such as butylamine and butanethiol says “Yes”, but the other says “Not always”.

    2. Reactions of Neopentyl 2,2,2,-Trifluoroethanesulfonate (Tresylate) with Nucleophiles: A Model Study for the Coupling of Nucleophiles with Tresyl Agarose (page 2495)

      Prof. Dr. James F. King and Manjinder Singh Gill

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199524952

      Is it prudent to compare homogeneous and heterogeneous phase reactions? One side of this discussion on the reactivity of certain tresylates to nucleophiles such as butylamine and butanethiol says “Yes”, but the other says “Not always”.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Correspondences
    5. Communications
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Book Reviews
    1. A Novel Method for the Synthesis of Isocyanates Under Mild Conditions (pages 2497–2500)

      Prof. Dr. Hans-Joachim Knölker, Dipl.-Chem. Tobias Braxmeier and Dipl.-Chem. Georg Schlechtingen

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199524971

      Not the amine-N-Boc derivatives, but the isocyanates form in the reaction of alkyl- or arylamines with di-tert-butyl dicarbonate ((Boc)2O) in the presence of a catalytic amount of 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) according to Equation (a). The procedure provides a simple laboratory method of generating sterically hindered alkyl and aryl isocyanates without the use of phosgene.

      • equation image
    2. P[BOND]H-Functionalized Phosphenium Complexes [C5R5(OC)2 W[DOUBLE BOND]P(H)R′] (R′ = tBu, sMes): Synthesis, Isomerization, and Transformation into Hydrido Complexes Containing a tBuP(H)OH Ligand (pages 2500–2502)

      Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Malisch, Dr. Ulrich-Andreas Hirth, Dipl.-Chem. Klaus Grün, Dr. Martin Schmeusser, Dipl.-Chem. Oliver Fey and Dr. Udo Weis

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The readily accessible P–H-functionalized half-sandwich phosphenium complexes 1a (R = tBu, sMes) are characterized by a high reactivity of the P[BOND]H or the W[DOUBLE BOND]P bond which is the basis for isomerization and addition reactions leading to the hydrido complexes 2 and 3. [BOND]◯ = H, Me.

    3. Oxidative Transformations of a Pyrimidalized 1,5-Diene (pages 2502–2504)

      Dr. Gerald Dyker, Dipl.-Chem. Jutta Körning, Prof. Dr. Peter G. Jones and Dipl.-Chem. Peter Bubenitschek

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An unexpected rearrangement occurs when the readily accessible epoxide 1 is filtered through alumina with toluene. The sole product formed is the spiroannelated [3.3.1]propellane 2.

    4. Soluble Aluminosilicates with Frameworks of Minerals (pages 2504–2506)

      Dipl.-Chem. Mavis L. Montero, Dipl.-Chem. Andreas Voigt, Markus Teichert, Dr. Isabel Usón and Prof. Dr. Herbert W. Roesky

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525041

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A silanetriol and organoaluminum compounds react smoothly to give aluminosilcates of the type shown, which are soluble in organic solvents. Their cubeshaped Al4Si4O12 groups represent the smallest building blocks of zeolite A. Perhaps compounds of this type will be used in the near future in rational solid-state syntheses under mild conditions. R1 = (2,6-iPr2C6H3)(SiMe3)N, R2 = 1,4-dioxane, THF, alkyl group.

    5. An Unconventional Intermolecular Three-Center N–H … H2Re Hydrogen Bond in Crystalline [ReH5(PPh3)3]·indole·C6H6 (pages 2507–2509)

      Jeremy Wessel, Dr. Jesse C. Lee Jr., Dr. Eduardo Peris, Dr. Glenn P. A. Yap, Jeffrey B. Fortin, Prof. Dr. John S. Ricci, Dr. Gjergji Sini, Prof. Dr. Alberto Albinati, Dr. Thomas F. Koetzle, Prof. Dr. Odile Eisenstein, Prof. Dr. Arnold L. Rheingold and Prof. Dr. Robert H. Crabtree

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three hydrogen atoms participate in the unusual hydrogen bond in complex 1, which is obtained when the rhenium compound is cocrystallized with indole from benzene. The structure of 1 was elucidated by means of neutron diffraction (HN … HM distances of 1.75 and 2.25 Å). The energy of the hydrogen bond was determined by IR spectroscopy (ΔH° = 4.3 ± 0.5 kcal mol−1). All these values were also reproduced by theoretical calculations. Indole may be a useful additive for crystal growing in general.

    6. Hydrothermal Synthesis of a Novel Se12 Ring in [{(NH4)2[Mo3S11.72Se1.28]}2[Se12]] (pages 2509–2511)

      Richard A. Stevens, Casey C. Raymond and Prof. Dr. Peter K. Dorhout

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new form of selenium, neutralcyclo-Se12 (see picture), is entrapped within ionic layers of the title compound. It arises from the hydrothermal reaction between (NH4)2MoS4 and Na2S3Se3. The D3d-symmetric twelve-membered ring is embedded in a trigonal lattice of [Mo3(S11.72Se1.28)]2− clusters and ammonium cations. The title compound forms black, hexagonal platelets.

    7. From Porphyrin Isomers to Octapyrrolic “Figure Eight” Macrocycles (pages 2511–2514)

      Prof. Dr. Emanuel Vogel, Martin Bröring, Jürgen Fink, Daniel Rosen, Dr. Hans Schmickler, Dr. Johann Lex, Kyle W. K. Chan, Prof. Dr. Yun-Dong Wu, Dr. Dietmar A. Plattner, Maja Nendel and Prof. Dr. Kendall N. Houk

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cyclooctapyrroles such as 1–3 tend to form during the condensation of dipyrrolic units if cyclization to cyclotetrapyrroles is hindered for conformational reasons. These macrocycles are chiral and might afford interesting complexes with metal ions. Their most intriguing feature is their unusual figure-eight conformation.

    8. Octaphyrin-(1.0.1.0.1.0.1.0) (pages 2515–2517)

      Martin Bröring, Jörg Jendrny, Lars Zander, Dr. Hans Schmickler, Dr. Johann Lex, Prof. Dr. Yun-Dong Wu, Maja Nendel, Jiangang Chen, Dr. Dietmar A. Plattner, Kendall N. Houk and Prof. Dr. Emanuel Vogel

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The formal exchange of the pyrrole units of porphyrin by bipyrrole units provides the title compound 1. The hexadecaethyl derivative of 1 is the only isolable product of a MacDonald condensation of tetrapyrrolic as well as of dipyrrolic components. The new cyclooctapyrrole adopts a figure-eight conformation in the solid state as well as in solution.

    9. Coordination of Dioxygen in Three Representative Transition Metal Cations: FeOmath image, CrOmath image, and [CH3Re(O2)2O]+ (pages 2517–2520)

      Dr. Detlef Schröder, Dipl.-Chem. Andreas Fiedler, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang A. Herrmann and Prof. Dr. Helmut Schwarz

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525171

      How is dioxygen activated by “naked” or ligated metals? Details of the potential energy surfaces of the three representative cations [Fe,O2]+, [Cr,O2]+, and [CH3Re(O2)2O]+ were correlated with mass spectrometric data. The results may lead to a better understanding of O2 activation in synthetic, industrial, and biological processes.

    10. The Macrolidic Glycolipid Calonyctin A, a Plant Growth Regulator: Synthesis, Structural Assignment, and Conformational Analysis in Micellar Solution (pages 2520–2524)

      Dr. Zi-Hua Jiang, Dr. Armin Geyer and Prof. Dr. Richard R. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525201

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A tetrasaccharide, nilic acid, and jalapinolic acid served as building blocks in the total synthesis of calonyctin A (1) (n = 1, 2). The conformation of this amphiphilic glycolipid was studied in micellar solution by NMR spectroscopy and molecuar dynamics simulation.

    11. Synthesis of Novel Tetrathiafulvalene-Based [3]Pseudocatenanes by Self-Assembly; Prevention of trans/cis Isomerization (pages 2524–2528)

      Dr. Zhan-Ting Li, Dr. Paul C. Stein, Niels Svenstrup, Kirsten H. Lund and Prof. Dr. Jan Becher

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525241

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Four catenanes having a tetrathiafulvalene unit in the biscyclic macrocycle and cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in the second macrocycle are described. The TTF units locked inside the cyclophane cages do not isomerize even in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid. One of the four catenanes is shown on the right.

    12. Selective Isomerization of Hydrocarbon Chains on External Surfaces of Zeolite Crystals (pages 2528–2530)

      Prof. Dr. Ir. Johan A. Martens, Drs. Ir. Wim Souverijns, Dr. Ir. Wim Verrelst, Dr. Ir. Rudy Parton, Prof. Dr. Ir. Gilbert F. Froment and Prof. Dr. Ir. Pierre A. Jacobs

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525281

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A mechanism has been found that explains the distribution of products obtained in the isomerizations of long-chain alkanes on ZSM-22 and SAPO-11 catalysts so well that it should now be possible to tailor reactions for the synthesis of branched hydrocarbons. The reactions occur at the external surface of the catalyst according to a lock-and-key model (shown on the right); thus, the classical concept of shape-selective catalysis within micropores is substantially extended.

    13. Photochromism Dependent on Crystal Packing: Photoinduced and Thermal Proton-Transfer Processes in Single Crystals of 6-(2,4-Dinitrobenzyl)-2,2′-Bipyridine (pages 2530–2533)

      Dr. Yoav Eichen, Prof. Dr. Jean-Marie Lehn, Michael Scherl, Prof. Dr. Dietrich Haarer, Prof. Dr. Jean Fischer, Dr. André DeCian, Dr. Anne Corval and Prof. Dr. Hans Peter Trommsdorff

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525301

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Despite structural similarities, different photoreactivities are displayed by the two crystalline phases of 6-(2,4-dinitrobenzyl)-2,2′-bipyridine. Whereas one phase (the arrangement of the molecules in the unit cell of this phase is shown on the right) undergoes a photoinduced proton transfer process, the other is photoinert. Deuteration causes a marked increase in the lifetime of the colored phototautomer.

    14. Oxybenziporphyrin, a Fully Aromatic Semiquinone Porphyrin Analog with Pathways for 18π-Electron Delocalization (pages 2533–2535)

      Prof. Timothy D. Lash

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525331

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The hydroxyl substituent makes it happen! Unlike the nonaromatic benziporphyrin 1a (X = H), the hydroxy compound 1b (X = OH) favors the fully aromatic semiquinone tautomer 2.

    15. A Dinuclear (μ-Carboxylato)manganese(II) Complex Derived from a Macrocyclic Ligand: A Structural Model for Active Sites in Natural Systems (pages 2535–2537)

      Harry Adams, Dr. Neil A. Bailey, Dr. Noele Debaecker, Prof. Dr. David E. Fenton, Dr. Wakako Kanda, Dr. Jean-Marc Latour, Prof. Hisashi Okawa and Dr. Hiroshi Sakiyama

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525351

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Even in solution only a single μ-carboxylato bridge links the metal centers in complex 1, according to EPR studies. This feature makes the complex an interesting structural model for the active center in enzymes that contain two manganese atoms. In D-xylose isomerase, for example, the manganese atoms are linked by a single bridging carboxylate(glutamate) residue.

    16. Activation of Macrocyclic Biaryl-Enediynes by Metal Ion Coordination (pages 2538–2540)

      Dr. Burkhard König, Helli Hollnagel, Birte Ahrens and Prof. Dr. Peter G. Jones

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525381

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cyclization temperature drops by 100 °C when the 2,2′-bipyridine moiety of enediyene 1 is coordinated by a Hg2+ ion (as in 2). This noncovalent interaction induces a change in conformation that is translated into a significantly increased proclivity for Bergman cyclization. This approach could be used, in principle, to activate strained, inactive enediyne prodrugs for cytotoxic action. tfa = F3CCO2

    17. Synthesis and Structure of Bimetallic η46-Naphthalene Complexes Containing a Mn[BOND]Mn Moiety Bonded in a syn-Facial Manner: A General Route to Homo- and Heteronuclear Bimetallic Complexes of Polyarenes (pages 2540–2542)

      Shouheng Sun, Conor A. Dullaghan, Prof. Gene B. Carpenter, Dr. Anne L. Rieger, Prof. Philip H. Rieger and Prof. Dwight A. Sweigart

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525401

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ability of [(polyarene)Mn(CO)3]+ to function as a facile manganese tricarbonyl transfer reagent is the basis for a general synthetic route to homo- and heteronuclear bimetallic complexes of naphthalenes and related fused ring systems such as 1,2, and 3.

    18. Commensurate Freezing of n-Alkanes in Silicalite (pages 2543–2544)

      Ir. Willy J. M. van Well, Ing. Jillus P. Wolthuizen, Dr. Ir. Berend Smit, Prof. Dr. Ir. Jan H. C. van Hooff and Prof. Dr. Rutger A. van Santen

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525431

      Very surprising desorption behavior from silicalite is shown by n-hexane and n-heptane among the n-alkanes ranging from n-butane to n-decane. While n-hexane and n-heptane show a two-step desorption, longer and shorter n-alkanes desorb in a single step. These results can be explained by commensurate freezing, a phenomenon which was predicted very recently by computer simulations.

    19. Unprecedented Intra- and Intermolecular Palladium-Catalyzed Coupling Reactions with Methylenecylclopropane-Type Tetrasubstituted Alkenes (pages 2545–2547)

      Dipl.-Chem. Stefan Bräse and Prof. Dr. Armin de Meijere

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525451

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A reaction cascade consisting of a Heck coupling, cyclopropyl ring-opening, and a domino Diels–Alder reaction proceeds in one pot. The palladium-catalyzed coupling of bicyclopylidene (1) with vinyl iodide, even in the presence of dienophile 3, affords dendralene 2, which then reacts smoothly with 3 (R1 = H, CO2Me; R2 = CO2Me) to give bisadducts 4 in satisfactory yields. The key factor in this reaction sequence is that the carbopalladation of the unusual tetrasubstituted alkene 1 proceeds more rapidly than the Heck reaction with the dienophile.

    20. A Functionalized Polyoxometalate Bearing a Ferrocenylimido Ligand: Preparation and Structure of [(FcN)Mo6O18]2− (pages 2547–2548)

      Joseph L. Stark, Dr. Victor G. Young Jr. and Prof. Eric A. Maatta

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525471

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An elusive goal—that of enforcing the interaction of an electron donor at a polyoxometalate acceptor in solution—has been realized. Covalent tethering of a ferrocenyl group to the hexamolybdate cluster was achieved by the introduction of a ferrocenylimido (FcN) ligand, yielding the anion [(FcN)Mo6O18]2−1 (shown schematically on the right). The simple synthesis of 1 should also be applicable to other systems and thus may provide new opportunities in the field of charge transfer salts with polyoxometalate anions.

    21. A Te2N6Li4 Cage Containing the Tris(tert-butylimido)tellurite Dianion (pages 2549–2551)

      Prof. Dr. Tristram Chivers, Dr. Xiaoliang Gao and Dr. Masood Parvez

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525491

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nonexplosive, easy-to-handle Te[BOND]N reagent is the Li2 derivative of the tris(tert-butylimido)tellurite dianion 1, which can be prepared from [(tBuN)Te]2(μ-NtBu)2 and tBuNHLi. The Te2N6Li4 cage in 1 adopts a distorted hexagonal prismatic structure. The reaction of 1 with PhPCl2 or PhBCl2 produces the spirocycle 2 and the four-membered ring 3, respectively.

    22. Nucleophilic Attack on (π-Allyl)palladium Complexes: Direction of the Attack to the Central or Terminal Carbon Atom by Ligand Control (pages 2551–2553)

      Dr. Ana M. Castaño, Dr. Attila Aranyos, Dr. Kálmán J. Szabó and Prof. Dr. Jan-E. Bäckvall

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525511

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Strongly stabilized carbon nucleophiles such as dialkyl malonates can also attack the central carbon of (π-allyl)palladium complexes. The regiochemistry of the reaction (attack at the terminal or C2 carbon atom; see picture) is controlled by the choice of the ligands L in the palladium complex. E = CO2Et, L = PPh3, PtBu3, P(OPh)3, etc.

    23. 6,7-Bis(methoxycarbonyl)-2,3-dimethyl-[5](1,4)naphthalenophane, the First Benzoannelated [5]Paracyclophane (pages 2553–2555)

      Daniël S. van Es, Franciscus J. J. de Kanter, Willem H. de Wolf and Friedrich Bickelhaupt

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525531

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The compound 2 forms 35% of the photodynamic equilibrium mixture with its precursor 1. Compound 2 is the smallest known [n](1,4)naphthalenophane and the most stable derivative of [5]paracyclophane known to date. Compound 1 was obtained in five steps from the Dewar benzene 3.

    24. Concave Reagents Based on Calixarenes (pages 2555–2557)

      Dipl.-Chem. Haymo Ross and Prof. Dr. Ulrich Lüning

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525551

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-dilution conditions are not needed to bridge p-tert-butylcalix[6]arene with 2,6-bis(bromomethyl)pyridine giving the bimacrocycle 1 (R = H). The concave compund 1 can incorporate 4-nitrophenol but not 2,6-dimethyl-4-nitrophenol in its cavity, and catalyzes the addition of alcohols to diphenylketene.

    25. Synthesis and Structure of the Three-Dimensional Coordination Polymers [(Me3Sn)4M(CN)8] (M = Mo, W) (pages 2557–2559)

      Dr. J. Lu, Dr. W. T. A. Harrison and Prof. A. J. Jacobson

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525571

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solutions of K4[Mo(CN)8] and Me3SnCl interdiffuse to form crystals of 1, a three-dimensional coordination polymer containing large channels from which some of the solvent molecules can be removed without the collapse of the structure (section of structure depicted on the right). The corresponding iso-structural tungsten compound can be obtained analogously starting from K4[W(CN)8].

      • equation image
    26. Temath image: A Cubic Polycation in the Structure of Te8(VOCl4)2 (pages 2559–2561)

      Prof. Dr. Johannes Beck and Dr. Gunter Bock

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525591

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A distorted cube or two four-membered rings linked through two bonds are alternative descriptive of the tellurium polycation Temath image (shown on the right) in Te8(VOCl4)21. The Temath image and VOClmath image ions in 1 both form one-dimensional chains. The Te8 cube can be derived from the α-Po structure or from paired Temath image ions.

  5. Corrigenda

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Correspondences
    5. Communications
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Book Reviews
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum (page 2561)

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525611

  6. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Correspondences
    5. Communications
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Book Review: Inorganic Experiments. Edited by J. D. Woollins (page 2565)

      Johannes Beck

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199525651

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