Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 15

August 1996

Volume 35, Issue 15

Pages 1586–1739

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 15/1996)

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199615851

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the time dependence of the optical rotation of a solution of a mixture of the bicyclic lactam 2-azabicyclo[2.2.2]hept-5-en-3-one enantiomers, which depicts oscillations during resolution by the preferential crystallization method. This phenomenon arises because layers of the (−)- and (+)-enantiomers (depicted as red and green hexagons, respectively) crystallize alternately from solution to form each crystal. The results on this apparently bizarre and unprecedented oscillating behavior are described in the communication by A. Collet et al. on p. 1666.

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Communications
    5. Book Reviews
    1. Polymers and the Periodic Table: Recent Developments in Inorganic Polymer Science (pages 1602–1621)

      Prof. Ian Manners

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616021

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      The incorporation of inorganic elements in the main chain of polymers is an attractive method for accessing processable materials with novel properties. In this article, recent advances in the inorganic polymer field are surveyed, with emphasis on the new polymer systems prepared over the last decade such as 1–3.

    2. Chemistry and Biology of the Zaragozic Acids (Squalestatins) (pages 1622–1656)

      Dr. Alan Nadin and Prof. K. C. Nicolaou

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616221

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      Novel structures and profound biological activity are the prerequisites for exciting, multifaceted projects in natural products chemistry. Zaragozic acids such as compound 1 are excellent examples. Their unusual, heavily oxygenated core structure and effectiveness in lowering serum cholesterol levels have motivated tremendous research activity since their discovery in 1991/1992.

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Communications
    5. Book Reviews
    1. Asymmetric Autocatalysis with Amplification of Chirality (pages 1657–1659)

      Prof. Dr. Carsten Bolm, Dr. Frank Bienewald and Dipl.-Chem. Andreas Seger

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616571

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A Darwinistic principle in catalysis? The term for the catalysis of an asymmetric, catalyzed reaction by its product is “asymmetric autocatalysis”. The enantiomeric excess of a self-replicating system such as that described by Soai et al. can be amplified enormously in several reaction cycles [Eq. (a)].

    2. Organocyanide Acceptor Molecules as Novel Ligands (pages 1659–1661)

      Prof. Kim R. Dunbar

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616591

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metallic or ferromagnetic properties are displayed by Cu complexes with the dicyanoquinodiimine (DCNQI) anion and a V complex with the tetracyanoethyletylenc (TCNE) anion. These exceptional properties arise from pπ–dπ ligand–metal interactions. An entire field based on the coordination chemistry of organocyanides is emerging, aided by the discoveries of unusual molecules such as 1 (M = Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn) that involve coupling of two TCNE ligands on a metal center.

  3. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Communications
    5. Book Reviews
    1. Crystallization of Supramolecular Materials: Perhydrotriphenylene (PHTP) Inclusion Compounds with Nonlinear Optical Properties (pages 1664–1666)

      Dr. Ralf Hoss, Olaf König, Dr. Vera Kramer-Hoss, Urs Berger, Peter Rogin and Prof. Dr. Jürg Hulliger

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616641

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A linear arrangement of guest molecules in perhydrotriphenylene inclusion compounds can lead to supramolecular materials with optimized physical properties. Through cocrystallization, different guests displaying pronounced nonlinear optical properties were incorporated within the channels of the host species (shown on the right) to give a high yield of polar single crystals.

    2. Oscillating Crystallization of (+) and (–) Enantiomers during Resolution by Entrainment of 2-Azabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-en-3-one (pages 1666–1668)

      Dr. Gerard A. Potter, Dr. Chantal Garcia, Dr. Raymond McCague, Dr. Brian Adger and Prof. André Collet

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616661

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      Lamellar twinning of opposite enantiomers explains why the enantiomeric composition of a supersaturated solution oscillates during resolution by preferential crystallization of the bicyclic lactam (1; see diagram on the right).

    3. Discovery of Chiral Catalysts through Ligand Diversity: Ti-Catalyzed Enantioselective Addition of TMSCN to meso Epoxides (pages 1668–1671)

      Dr. Bridget M. Cole, Dr. Ken D. Shimizu, Clinton A. Krueger, Dr. Joseph P. A. Harrity, Prof. Marc L. Snapper and Prof. Amir H. Hoveyda

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616681

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      The first catalytic and enantioselective opening of meso epoxides with trimethylsilylcyanide (TMSCN) [Eq. (a)] is reported. Combinatorial strategies and solid-phase techniques were used for optimization of asymmetric induction through parallel synthesis and screening of peptide-derived ligands. A dipeptide Schiff base that affords high enantioselectivities was identified through iterative modification of the modular ligand structure.

    4. The Complete Structure of Maitotoxin, Part I: Configuration of the C1[BOND]C14 Side Chain (pages 1672–1675)

      Dr. Makoto Sasaki, Nobuaki Matsumori, Takahiro Maruyama, Taro Nonomura, Prof. Dr. Michio Murata, Prof. Dr. Kazuo Tachibana and Dr. Takeshi Yasumoto

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616721

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      All's well that ends well! The complete assignment of the structure of the largest known natural product that is not a biopolymer (maitotoxin) has concluded with the determination of the configurations of the stereogenic centers in its two acyclic side chains. The results of NMR studies were confirmed by comparison with synthesized model compounds. The absolute configuration was determined by analysis of a fragment of the natural product and a corresponding synthesized unit by GC with a chiral column. In the contracted structure below, the acyclic side chains are attached to the termini of a polycyclic polyether.

    5. The Complete Structure of Maitotoxin, Part II: Configuration of the C135[BOND]C142 Side Chain and Absolute Configuration of the Entire Molecule (pages 1675–1678)

      Taro Nonomura, Dr. Makoto Sasaki, Nobuaki Matsumori, Prof. Dr. Michio Murata, Prof. Dr. Kazuo Tachibana and Prof. Dr. Takeshi Yasumoto

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616751

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      All's well that ends well! The complete assignment of the structure of the largest known natural product that is not a biopolymer (maitotoxin) has concluded with the determination of the configurations of the stereogenic centers in its two acyclic side chains. The results of NMR studies were confirmed by comparison with synthesized model compounds. The absolute configuration was determined by analysis of a fragment of the natural product and a corresponding synthesized unit by GC with a chiral column. In the contracted structure below, the acyclic side chains are attached to the termini of a polycyclic polyether.

    6. Diastereoselective C[BOND]C Bond Formation with Nonracemic Planar-Chiral η2-Manganese Complexes (pages 1678–1680)

      Prof. Dr. Dieter Schinzer and Dipl.-Chem. Heiko Bärmann

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616781

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Asymmetric alkylations and kinetically controlled aldol reactions are possible with the planar-chiral η2-manganese complexes of cyclopent-2-enone that can now be prepared in enantiomerically pure form [Eq. (a); LDA = lithium diisopropylamide; R = Me, allyl, Bn or RX = R′CHO, R′ = iPr, Ph]. After mild demetalation the chiral cyclopentenone derivatives, which are difficult to prepare by other means, are obtained with good enantiomeric excesses.

    7. Absolute Configurations of the Inhalation Anesthetics Isoflurane and Desflurane (pages 1680–1682)

      Prof. Dr. Volker Schurig, Dipl.-Chem. Markus Juza, Prof. Bernard S. Green, Dr. Jörg Horakh and Prof. Dr. Arndt Simon

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616801

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A controversial assignment has been revisited by the determination of the absolute configurations of ( + )-isoflurane [(+)-1] and (+)-desflurane [(+)-2] by anomalous X-ray dispersion at −180°C. The dextrorotatory isomers should have the (S) configuration, in agreement with other findings. The consequences of this assignment are particularly important for the stereochemical course of certain enantioselective reactions.

    8. Influence of Anchor Lipids on the Homogeneity and Mobility of Lipid Bilayers on Thin Polymer Films (pages 1682–1685)

      Dipl.-Chem. Dierk Beyer, Dipl.-Phys. Gunther Elender, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Knoll, Dipl.-Phys. Martin Kühner, Dipl.-Chem. Steffen Maus, Prof. Dr. Helmut Ringsdorf and Prof. Dr. Erich Sackmann

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616821

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymer-supported lipid bilayers on solid substrates are of particular interest for the investigation of membrane proteins. A great improvement in the homogeneity of such lipid bilayers can be obtained by the introduction of “anchor lipids” into the monolayer facing the substrate. The resulting attached lipid bilayers (tethered supported bilayers) like that shown schematically on the right are interesting biomembrane models.

    9. La9Br5(CBC)3: A New Superconductor (pages 1685–1687)

      Dr. Hansjürgen Mattausch, Prof. Dr. Arndt Simon, Dr. Claudia Felser and Priv.-Doz. Dr. Richard Dronskowski

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616851

      A “fingerprint” that we believe to be an essential condition for superconductivity is shown by the electronic band structure of the novel phase Ce9Br5(CBC)3. Although the magnetic moment of the Ce3+ ion quenches superconductivity, the isostructural lanthanum compound is a superconductor at 6 K.

    10. Modeling of the Chemistry of the Active Site of Galactose Oxidase (pages 1687–1690)

      Jason A. Halfen, Dr. Victor G. Young Jr and Prof. William B. Tolman

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616871

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sterically hindered triazacyclononane derivatives bearing one alkyl-substituted phenolato group have enabled the synthesis of copper complexes that mimic key intermediates in the postulated catalysis cycle of galactose oxidase. For example, one-electron oxidation of the copper(II) complex pictured on the right yields benzaldehyde, probably with participation of a CuII complex containing a phenoxyl radical. A similar mechanism has been proposed for the active enzyme.

    11. A Cubic (3,4)-Connected Net with Large Cavities in Solvated [Cu3(tpt)4](ClO4)3 (tpt = 2,4,6-Tri(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine) (pages 1690–1692)

      Dr. Brendan F. Abrahams, Stuart R. Batten, Hasan Hamit, Dr. Bernard F. Hoskins and Dr. Richard Robson

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616901

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two independent and identical interpenetrating three-dimensional networks of a highly symmetrical type in which tpt ligands act as trigonal building blocks and CuI ions as tetrahedral 4-connecting units are contained in cubic crystals of the title compounds. Tpt units appear in centrosymmetrically related pairs within which triazine rings make close π[BOND]π contacts.

    12. Total Synthesis of (+)-Camptothecin (pages 1692–1694)

      Prof. Dr. Marco A. Ciufolini and Frank Roschangar

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616921

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A quinoline, a chiral aldehyde, and cyanoacetamide are the three components (see retrosynthesis below) merged in five steps to afford the antitumor agent ( + )-camptothecin (CPT, 1). The overall yield of CPT is 30% over ten steps from dimethyl 2-ethylmalonate (the precursor of the aldehyde component). MOM = methoxymethyl.

    13. Ancillary Ligand Dependent Shifts in Charge Distribution for Cobalt–Quinone Complexes (pages 1694–1695)

      Prof. Ok-Sang Jung, Dr. Du Hwan Jo, Prof. Young-A Lee, Dr. Youn Soo Sohn and Prof. Cortlandt G. Pierpont

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616941

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The length of the carbon chain between the N-donor centers of the bidentate amine ligand N[BOND]N ( = Me2N(CH2)nNMe2) determines the charge distribution in the redox isomers of cobalt complexes of the type [CoIII(N[BOND]N)(sq)(cat)] and [CoII(N[BOND]N)-(sq)2] with semiquinone (sq) and catecholate (cat) as additional ligands. Complexes with tmmda (n = 1) and tmeda (n = 2; 1) exist as CoIII isomers at temperatures below 350 K. The addition of a third methylene group (tmpda, n = 3; 2) to the chelate ring results in a dramatic drop in the CoIII/CoII transition temperature of 200 K.

    14. Diisocyanate (pages 1696–1697)

      Prof. Dr. Günther Maier, Dipl.-Chem. Matthias Naumann, Dr. Hans Peter Reisenauer and Dr. Jürgen Eckwert

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616961

      Sure diisocyanate (1) exists! Those who believed that of the many conceivable C2N2O2 isomers only cyanogendi-N-oxide (1) could be synthesized were mistaken. It is possible to generate diisocyanate by means of matrix-isolation techniques, to characterize it spectroscopically, and to compile data on its stability.

      • equation image
    15. Prenylation of Benzoic Acid Derivatives Catalyzed by a Transferase from Escherichia coli Overproduction: Method Development and Substrate Specificity (pages 1697–1699)

      Dr. Ludger Wessjohann and Bernd Sontag

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199616971

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      The enzymatic Friedel–Crafts alkylation for the synthesis of up to fivefold ring-substituted 3-polyprenylbenzoic acid derivatives can be accomplished regiospecifically with a polyprenyl-transferase, which exhibits a surprisingly broad substrate spectrum ([Eq. (a)]; OPP = pyrophosphate). Although a membrane enzyme, its simple production and enrichment, and good shelf life provide an excellent basis for general use in organic synthesis.

    16. New Cobalt- and Iron-Catalyzed Reactions of Organozinc compounds (pages 1700–1701)

      Dr. C. Kishan Reddy and Prof. Dr. Paul Knochel

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A wide range of polyfunctional ketones and allylic compounds is accessible under mild reaction conditions through an efficient CoII-catalyzed acylation or allylation of diorganozinc compounds (see below). The remarkable stability of the intermediate σ-alkyl transition metal complexes is crucial for the success of the reactions.

    17. Hexakis(but-3-ynyl)benzene (pages 1701–1704)

      Dr. Hans-W. Marx, Dr. Françoise Moulines, Dr. Trixie Wagner and Prof. Didier Astruc

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The twelvefold dehydrobromination provides the title compound 1 in a straightforward, easily reproducible synthesis. In the solid state 1 displays a well-defined structure with Ci symmetry, in which four of the the six branches assume trans and two assume gauche arrangements. Compound 1, which can be stannylated, deprotonated, and complexed, should be a useful intermediate in the preparation of dendritic structures.

    18. The Novel Encapsulation of Transition Metals in a Bioctahedral Rare Earth Metal Cluster: Cs2La10I17Co2 (pages 1704–1706)

      Dr. Michael Lulei, Paul A. Maggard and Prof. John D. Corbett

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617041

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      A missing link in the chemistry of rare earth metal cluster compounds stabilized by interstitial transition metals is the new La10Co2 dimeric cluster shown on the right with its iodine environment. The most remarkable structural features of this cluster are the two edge-sharing La octahedra, each centered by a Co atom.

    19. Like on Heterogeneous Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) Catalysts, the Homogeneous HDS of Benzo[b]thiophene Is Achived by the Concomitant Action of a Metal Promoter (Rh) and an Active HDS Component (W) (pages 1706–1708)

      Dr. Claudio Bianchini, Dr. M. Victoria Jiménez, Dr. Carlo Mealli, Dr. Andrea Meli, Dr. Simonetta Moneti, Dr. Véronique Patinec and Dr. Francesco Vizza

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617061

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The heterobimetallic complex 1 is the species that occurs immediately prior to hydrodesulfurization of benzo[b]thiophene. The Rh component is responsible for the initial C[BOND]S bond scission, and the W component, after addition of hydrogen, for the desulfurization.

    20. Two-Phase Catalysis: A Strategy for Avoiding Consecutive Reactions as Exemplified in the Telomerization of Butadiene and Ammonia (pages 1708–1710)

      Dipl.-Chem. Thomas Prinz, Prof. Dr. Wilhelm Keim and Dr. Birgit Driessen-Hölscher

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617081

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      The industrially interesting primary octadienylamines 1 and 2 can be synthesized selectively for the first time from 1,3-butadiene and ammonia. The use of an aqueous catalyst phase together with an organic solvent as a second phase are the key to the success of this process. Consecutive reactions of the primary amines 1 and 2, which are more nucleophilic than ammonia, can thus be avoided.

    21. [Mn(CO)5], the First Square-Pyramidal Pentacarbonyl Complex in the Complex Salt [Ph4P][Mn(CO)5], and [Mn3Se2(CO)9]2−, the First Mixed Carbonyl-Selenido Complex of Manganese (pages 1710–1712)

      Dipl.-Chem. Renate Seidel, Dipl.-Chem. Birgit Schnautz and Prof. Dr. Gerald Henkel

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617101

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      [Mn2(CO)10] disproportionates in the reaction with Na2Se in THF leading to [Mn(CO)5] and [Mn3Se2(CO)9]2− ions. In the crystal the former has a square-pyramidal geometry, whereas the latter contains a novel asymmetric carbonyl bridge (see picture on the right), which is also present in the “King complex” [Fe3S2(CO)9][Fe2(S2)(CO)6].

    22. A Designed Non-Peptidic Receptor that Mimics the Phosphocholine Binding Site of the McPC603 Antibody (pages 1712–1715)

      J. Oriol Magrans, Dr. Angel R. Ortiz, Dr. M. Antònia Molins, Paul H. P. Lebouille, Prof. Dr. Jorge Sánchez-Quesada, Prof. Dr. Pilar Prados, Prof. Dr. Miquel Pons, Prof. Dr. Federico Gago and Prof. Dr. Javier de Mendoza

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617121

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The two key interactions in the binding of phosphorylcholine by the antibody McPC603 are utilized in the complexation of dioctanoyl-L-α-phosphatidyl-choline (DOPC) and a novel non-peptidic abiotic receptor. These interactions are drawn as dotted lines in the structure of the complex shown on the right: hydrogen bonds between the choline phosphate and the guanidinium unit of the receptor, and cation–π interactions between the ammonium group of DOPC and the calixarene unit of the receptor.

    23. Selection of Different Reactive Sites by Enantiomers in Electron-Transfer Reactions Involving Metalloproteins (pages 1716–1717)

      Prof. Klaus Bernauer and Dipl.-Chem. Luca Verardo

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Different binding sites a and b on the protein surface (see the schematic diagram on the right) can be selected by enantiomeric metal complexes for electron transfer reactions. This was the result of circular dichroism studies of the products of the reaction between the CuII-containing plastocyanin (PcCuII) and chiral CoII complexes [CoL].

    24. A Mobility Filter for the Detection and Identification of Charged Species in Complex Liquid Mixtures by ENMR Phase Difference Spectroscopy (pages 1717–1720)

      Dipl.-Phys. Stefan R. Heil and Dr. Manfred Holz

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617171

      In situ electrophoresis is combined with the selectivity of NMR spectroscopy in electrophoretic NMR (ENMR). In a simple new ENMR experiment the signals of ions and electrically charged molecules or aggregates are filtered from the 1D NMR spectrum of a complex liquid mixture. Only the signals of charged species remain in a phase difference spectrum, facilitating the detection and identification of these particles, even when 2D ENMR methods fail.

    25. Enzymatic Synthesis of a Characteristic Phosphorylated and Glycosylated Peptide Fragment of the Large Subunit of Mammalian RNA Polymerase II (pages 1720–1723)

      Dr. Torsten Pohl and Prof. Dr. Herbert Waldmann

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617201

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      The application of different enzymatic protecting group techniques has allowed the first synthesis of a complex and sensitive phosphoglycohexa-peptides like 1 under very mild conditions. This process makes repeated use of the p-phenylacetoxybenzyl-oxycarbonyl protecting group, which can be cleaved selectively with penicillin G acylase.

    26. Semisynthesis of Taxol: A Highly Enantio- and Diastereoselective Synthesis of the Side Chain and a New Method for Ester Formation at C13 Using Thioesters (pages 1723–1725)

      Prof. Dr. Cesare Gennari, Dr. Anna Vulpetti, Monica Donghi, Dr. Nicola Mongelli and Dr. Ermes Vanotti

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617231

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The production of Paclitaxel (taxol, 2) on an industrial scale may be possible with a novel semisynthesis relying on the readily accessible 10-deacetylbaccatin III and the side-chain unit 1. The crucial factor is the remarkably high yield for the 13-O-acylation of the terpene framework, which is usually very difficult. Thioester 1 can be prepared fairly directly with the desired relative and absolute configuration by addition of the appropriate boron enolate to an imine.

    27. Asymmetric Epoxidation of Enones With Oxygen in the Presence of Diethylzinc and (R,R)-N-Methylpseudoephedrine (pages 1725–1728)

      Prof. Dr. Dieter Enders, Dr. Jiqun Zhu and Dr. Gerhard Raabe

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617251

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An efficient method for the asymmetric epoxidation of α,β-unsaturated ketones 1 is embodied in their reaction with oxygen in the presence of diethylzinc and (R,R)-N-methyl-pseudoephedrine. It affords epoxides 2 in excellent yields, with complete diastereoselectivity, and with enantiomeric excesses of up to 92% ee. The enantiomerically pure amino alcohol employed can be recovered virtually quantitatively with unchanged optical purity.

    28. cis-Sodium Hyponitrite—A New Preparative Route and a Crystal Structure Analysis (pages 1728–1730)

      Dr. Claus Feldmann and Prof. Dr. Martin Jansen

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617281

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A reaction of laughing gas and Na2O at 360°C provides the title compound. In the crystal the planar N2Omath image ions form channels in which the Na cations are lined up like linear strings (picture right; equation image Na; ○ N,O). The Na cations are thus surrounded in a pseudo octahedral manner by the almost planar anions.

    29. Transition-Metal-Mediated Radical Reactions as an Easy Route to 2-C-Analogues of Carbohydrates (pages 1730–1732)

      Dr. Torsten Linker, Klaus Hartmann, Thomas Sommermann, Dieter Scheutzow and Elfriede Ruckdeschel

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617301

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mild reaction conditions and high stereoselectivities characterize the addition of dimethyl malonate (2) to tri-O-acetyl-D-glucal (1) in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN). Thus, the glucose C-analogue 3 can be synthesized in only one step in 62% yield.

    30. Isolation and Characterization of C80 (pages 1732–1734)

      Frank H. Hennrich, Rudi H. Michel, Achim Fischer, Sabine Richard-Schneider, Stefan Gilb, Prof. Manfred M. Kappes, Dr. Dirk Fuchs, Martin Bürk, Dr. Kaoru Kobayashi and Prof. Shigeru Nagase

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617321

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      One isomer of C80 with D2 symmetry (shown on the right) is isolated from carbon so⊙t generated by graphite arc discharge in helium. A comparison of the experimentally determined 13C NMR shifts with those obtained from ab initio calculations indicates that this isomer corresponds to the most stable D2 form.

  4. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Highlights
    4. Communications
    5. Book Reviews
    1. Book Review: Encyclopedia of Inorganic Chemistry. Edited by R. B. King (pages 1738–1739)

      George B. Kauffman, Timothy R. Hughbanks, Glenn T. Seaborg, Harry B. Gray and Robert T. Paine Jr.

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199617381

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