Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English

Cover image for Vol. 36 Issue 17

September 17, 1997

Volume 36, Issue 17

Pages 1777–1911

Currently known as: Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    1. Cover Picture (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 17/1997)

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199717761

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      The cover picture shows the novel anion[B12(BSe3)6]8−, which was synthesized as the cesium salt by a solid-state reaction from the elements. The icosahedral species is the first example of a new class of polyhedral boron clusters that combines both the structural features of polyhedral boranes and boron chalcogenides. Each boron atom of the B12 icosahedron is coordinated by a selenium atom of one of the six trigonal-planar BSe3 units (depicted as ball-and-stick models). The electron count of the molecular anion obeys Wade's rules. The bidentate binding mode of the BSe3 groups to the B12 polyhedra results in a novel type of planar five-membered B3Se2 rings. The synthesis, structure, and bonding of this first boron icosahedron with complete chalcogen substitution are described by B. Krebs et al. on pages 1903 ff.

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Reviews
    4. Highlights
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    1. You have free access to this content
      EDITORIAL (pages 1777–1778)

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199717771

  2. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Reviews
    4. Highlights
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Superconductivity and Chemistry (pages 1788–1806)

      Prof. Dr. Arndt Simon

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199717881

      How is superconductivity explained from a chemist's point of view? This question is discussed in this review, starting from the bonding in carbides and carbide halides of the rare earth metals. A general view of the origin of superconductivity is developed, which is based on a tendency for (pairwise) localization of conduction electrons with formation of Cooper pairs + k[UPWARDS ARROW]k[DOWNWARDS ARROW].

    2. ELF: The Electron Localization Function (pages 1808–1832)

      Priv.-Doz. Andreas Savin, Prof. Dr. Reinhard Nesper, Dr. Steffen Wengert and Dr. Thomas F. Fässler

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718081

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      Even missing atoms in solid-state structure can be localized by analyzing the electron density with the electron localization function (ELF). For instance, ELF analysis of the Ca4Sb2 structure revealed a high ELF value precisely at the position at which the originally overlooked oxygen atom was subsequently found. The picture shows a section through the ELF of the Ca6 octahedron without an interstitial O atom (left) and with this additional atom (right). The areas of application for ELF analysis range from ionic solids over intermetallic phases and covalent compounds to π system of organic compounds.

  3. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Reviews
    4. Highlights
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Well-Rounded Research: Nanotubes through Self-Assembly (pages 1833–1835)

      Priv.-Doz. Dr. Burkhard König

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718331

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      No magic triggers the stacking of macrocycles to nantubes (see diagram). Instead, this is a consequence of complementarily and reciprocal molecules recognition of the subunits. The supramolecular structures than allow the transport of ions and molecules through membranes, just like their biological models.

    2. β-Peptides: Novel Secondary Structures Take Shape (pages 1836–1837)

      Prof. Dr. Ulrich Koert

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718361

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      Why don't we live in β-peptide world? This is a legitimate question in light of new findings by D. Seebach et al. and S. Gellman et al. on the secondary structures of β-peptides. Peptides composed of less than ten β-amino acid residues can from stable, secondary structure motifs like the 31-M-helix shown on the right. In one study a hepta-β-peptide, which had been thermally denatured, refolded with-in 200 ps!

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Reviews
    4. Highlights
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Calix[4]tube: A Tobular Receptor with Remarkable Potassium Ion Selectivity (pages 1840–1842)

      Dr. Philippe Schmitt, Dr. Paul D. Beer, Dr. Michael G. B. Drew and Dr. Paul D. Sheen

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718401

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      Even after three days the uptake of Li+, Na+, Cs+, and Rb+ ions by the novel calix[4]tube receptor 1 is not significant (<70%), whereas K+ ions are complexes within one hour. This remarkable selectivity for K+ ions is reminiscent of that of potassium channel proteins.

    2. Coordination Arrays: Tetranuclear Cobalt(II) Complexes with [2 × 2]-Grid Structure (pages 1842–1844)

      Dr. Garry S. Hanan, Dr. Dirk Volkmer, Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert, Prof. Dr. Jean-Marie Lehn, Gerhard Baum and Prof. Dr. Dieter Fenske

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718421

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      The use of two tridentate ligands is the secret of success for the self-assembly of structurally intriguing tetranuclear CoII complexes. The cation [Co4(L)4]8+ (1) exists as a [2 × 2]-grid of octahedrally coordinated metal ions located at the corners of a square. The complex displays multiple redox processes and is of potential redox processes and is of potential interest for the development of electrochemically addressable inorganic arrays (R1, R2 = H, Me; • = CoII).

    3. Designed Self-Generation of an Extended Helical Structure From an Achiral Polyheterocylic Strand (pages 1845–1847)

      Dr. Dario M. Bassani, Prof. Dr. Jean-Marie Lehn, Gerhard Baum and Prof. Dr. Dieter Fenske

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718451

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      Both in solution and in the solid state the polyheterocyclic molecule 1 spontaneously adopts a helical structure with two turns. This convincingly demonstrates that the structural features encoded in the molecular strand can induce helicity, and points to the generality of this self-organization process.

    4. Analysis of the Bonding in [Ni55-S)(μ2-SR)5], an Unprecedented Pentanuclear Sulfide Cluster (pages 1847–1849)

      Fu-Wah Cheung and Dr. Zhenyang Lin

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718471

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      contrary to the common belief that a simple description of the bonding in Ni–S(Se) clusters is not possible, the electronic structure of the cluster [Ni5S(StBu)5] (1) can be understood in terms of an idealized molecular orbital interaction diagram. The more complicated cluster [Ni20Se12(SeMe)10]2− can also be analyzed in this manner.

    5. A Facile Synthesis of Unusual Liquid-Crystalline Gold(I) Dicarbene Compounds (pages 1850–1852)

      Kwang Ming Lee, Ching Kuan Lee and Prof. Dr. Ivan J. B. Lin

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718501

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      A highly ordered lamellar mesophase is exhibited by the thermally stable liquid-crystalline gold(I) dicarbene compounds presented here. The crystal structure of one of these compounds is depicted on the right.

    6. Cyclic “Acetylenosaccharides”—Novel Cyclodextrin Analogues (pages 1852–1853)

      Prof. Roland Bürli and Dr. Andrea Vasella

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718521

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      An antiparallel arrangement of water-containing tubes characterizes the crystal structure of the cyclotetramer 1. The tetramer 1, which binds to D- and L-adenosine in aqueous solution, was prepared in four steps in a yield of 50% from a 1,4-dialkynylated glucose derivative; the corresponding cyclohexamer and cyclootamer were isolated as byproducts.

    7. Organometallic Chemistry under Hydro(solvo)thermal conditions: Synthesis and X-ray structure of (Ph4P)2[Mn3(CO)9(S2)2(SH)], (Ph4P)[Mn2(CO)6(SH)3], and (Ph4P)2[Mn4(CO)13(Te2)3] (pages 1854–1856)

      Prof. Songping D. Huang, Chunqiu P. Lai and Dr. Charles L. Barnes

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718541

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      Different but so alike are the structure of the clusters (Ph4P)2[Mn3(CO)9(S2)2(SH)] and (Ph4P)2[Mn4(CO)13(Te2)3] (E [DOUBLE BOND] S or Te; structure of the anions depicted below), which form in the reaction of [Mn2(CO)10], Na2E2, Ph4PBR, and ethanol in a sealed tube at 85°C. The fundamental difference lies in the substitution of a hydrochalcogen by a dichalcogen in the Te compound and the concomittant extension of the cluster framework by a Mn(CO)4 fragment.

    8. A Five-Atom Molecule which Enantiomerizes in a Single Step via Chiral Transition States (pages 1856–1860)

      Dipl. Chem. Michael Mauksch and Prof. Dr. Paul von Ragué Schleyer

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718561

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      Synthetic chemists are challenged to find a five-atom molecule that, like cyclo-SeSSOS, can enantiomerize in a single step without passing through any achiral conformation. The barrier for the pseudorotation of cyclo-SeSSOS shown below is computed to be quite low: 6.2 kcal mol−1.

    9. Proton-Dependent Monomer–Oligomer Interconversion of Metal Complexes (pages 1860–1862)

      Prof. Naohide Matsumoto, Yukiko Mizuguchi, Genjin Mago, Shingo Eguchi, Hitoshi Miyasaka, Prof. Toshio Nakashima and Prof. Jean-Pierre Tuchagues

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718601

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      The reversible reaction of a monomeric CuII complex to a cyclic hexamer (crystal structures shown below) is the first example interconversion between a potential guest complex and a complex that cannot function as a guest [Eq. (a)]. It is—like in living organisms—controlled by a very common external signal, namely proton supply or abstraction.

    10. 2-Thioxoethen-1-one (O[DOUBLE BOND]C[DOUBLE BOND]C[DOUBLE BOND]S) (pages 1862–1864)

      Prof. Dr. Günther Maier, Dr. Hans Peter Reisenauer and Dipl.-Chem. Raimund Ruppel

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718621

      C2S2 can be detected in a matrix, whereas C2O2 cannot. What about C2OS? This question has now been answered with the generation of C2OS in an Ar matrix [Eq. (a)] and the characterization with matrix-isolation spectroscopy. Under matrix conditions C2OS is a stable molecule, which most likely exists in the triplet ground state.

      • equation image
    11. Pyrazinedioxide–Tetracyanoethylene Arrays in the Solid State—New Donor–Acceptor Interaction for Crystal Engineering (pages 1864–1866)

      Melinda L. Greer, Byron J. McGee, Prof. Robin D. Rogers and Prof. Silas C. Blackstock

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718641

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      Ladder and web polymorphic forms of cocrystals of tetramethylpyrazinedioxide (TMPDO) and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) are obtained by rapid or slow crystallization, respectively. In the thermodynamically less stable, purple (TMPDO)2− TCNE crystals the donor and acceptor building blocks are linked through N+O°C(alkene) interactions to form one-dimensional ladders (see picture below).

    12. In Search of Molecular Ratchets (pages 1866–1868)

      Prof. T. Ross Kelly, Dr. Imanol Tellitu and Dr. José Pérez Sestelo

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718661

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      Triptycylhelicenes 1 and 2 were examined as molecular rachets (see picture) in which the triptycene serves as the rachet wheel (a) and the helicenes as pawl (b) and spring (c). The ease of rotation of the triptycene wheel depends on the helicene springs and pawls, but do these have any influence on the direction of rotation?

    13. The Donor-Stabilized [PS2]+ Ion (pages 1869–1870)

      Prof. Dr. Manfred Meisel, Dr. Peter Lönnecke, Dr. Arnd-Rüdiger Grimmer and Dirk Wulff-Molder

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718691

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      With pyridine as a neutral electron-donor ligand, the [S [DOUBLE BOND] P [DOUBLE BOND] S]+ ion can be isolated as a salt [(C5H5N)2PS2]+X (X [DOUBLE BOND] Br, I) that is stabilized both in the solid state and in solution. The structures of these salts were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure analysis (structure depicted on the right). The position of the equilibrium that exist between [(C5H5N)2 PS2]X and (C5H5N)PS2X in acetonitrile is dependent on the basicity of the halogen.

    14. Direct Catalytic Asymmetric Aldol Reactions of Aldehydes with Unmodified Ketones (pages 1871–1873)

      Yoichi M. A. Yamada, Naoki Yoshikawa, Prof. Dr. Hiroaki Sasai and Prof. Dr. Masakatsu Shibasaki

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718711

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      Up to 94%ee can be achieved in the title reaction [Eq. (a)], which was previously only possible with enzymes. In this reaction LaLi3 tris(binaphthoxide) (LLB) imitates the function of enzymes by displaying both Lewis acidity and Brønsted basicity.

    15. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Phosphorus(V) Nitride α-P3N5 (pages 1873–1875)

      Dipl.-Chem. Stefan Horstmann, Mag. Elisabeth Irran and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schnick

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718731

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      A varied chemistry of ternary and higher phosphorus(v) nitrides has developed during the last few years. However, the crystal structure of the binary nitride P3N5 has proved elusive until now. The network structure built up by PN4 tetrahedra (depicted' on the right) resembles that of SiO2 and Si3N4. Surprisingly, in α-P3N5 the PN4 tetrahedra are also connected through edge-sharing.

    16. Preparation, NMR, and Ab Initio/IGLO/GIAO-MP2 Study of the Elusive Protonated Fluroformic Acid and Fluorocarbonyl Cation (pages 1875–1877)

      Prof. Dr. George A. Olah, Dr. Arwed Burrichter, Dr. Thomas Methew, Prof. Dr. Yashwant D. Vankar, Prof. Dr. Golam Rasul and Prof. Dr. G. K. Surya Prakash

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718751

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      Protolysis of tert-butyl fluoroformate [Eq.(a)] in a solution of FSO3H/SbF5-SO2ClF at −78°C yields the stable protonated form of the elusive fluoroformic acid [FC(OH)2]+. It was characterized by 1H, 13C, and 19F NMR spectroscopy. Evidence was also obtained for the formation of fluorocarbonyl cation [FCO]+, but not for diprotonated fluororformic acid [FC(OH2)OH2]+.

    17. [L3Ni(μ-L)3NiL3](AsF6)4, (L [DOUBLE BOND] N[TRIPLE BOND]SF2NMe2), a Dinuclear Nickel Complex with Bridging Thiazyl(dimethylamide)difluoride Ligands (pages 1878–1879)

      Prof. Dr. Ulrich Behrens, Dr. Jan Petersen, Dr. Enno Lork, Dr. Paul G. Watson and Prof. Dr. Rüdiger Mews

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718781

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      The nickel atoms are triply bridged in [Ni2L9]4+ (L [BOND] N[TRIPLE BOND]SF2NMe2), in which for the first time a nitrogen atom of a N[TRIPLE BOND]S bond acts as a bridging ligand. The structure of the Ni2 unit with all the coordinating N atoms is shown on the right.

    18. In Vitro Selection without Intervening Amplification (pages 1879–1881)

      Dr. Joseph Smith and Prof. Eric V. Anslyn

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718791

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      Iterative screenings without enzymatic amplification were successfully performed for DNA aptamers to ATP, thus demonstrating that in vitro selection of oligonucleotide libraries is possible without a polymerase step. The approach is shown schematically on the right.

    19. The Synthesis of Enantiopure ω-Methanoprolines and ω-Methanopipecolic Acids by a Novel Cyclopropanation Reaction: The “Flattering” of Proline (pages 1881–1884)

      Prof. Dr. Stephen Hanessian, Dr. Ulrich Reinhold and Gabriella Gentile

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718811

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      Conformationally constrained prolines (1,2) and pipecolic acids (3,4) can be synthesized stereoselectively by a novel cyclopropanation reaction. Considerable flattening of the ring can take place in the proline series. Such compounds for the preparation of peptidomimetics of therapeutic interest. Boc = tert-butoxycarbonyl.

    20. 1,8-Bis(dimethylamino)4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene, a Natural, Intramolecularly Protonated “Proton Sponge” with Zwitterionic Structure (pages 1884–1886)

      Prof. Dr. Heinz A. Staab, Claus Kriege, Dr. Gisela Hieber and Dr. Klaus Oberdorf

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718841

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      Not the expected structure 1, but the zweitterionic isomer 2 is found in crystals and solutions of the title compound. Molecules of 2 in the crystal form a type of belt, in which the positive part of the wzeitterion faces the negative part of its neighbor. This belt is coordinated to a corresponding second belt, in which the zwitterions are oriented in the opposite direction. This very interesting crystal packing prompts further studies of anisotropic crystal properties.

    21. Alaynl PNA: Evidence for Linear Band Structures Based on Guanine-Cytosin Base Pairs (pages 1886–1889)

      Dr. Ulf Diederichsen

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718861

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      Remarkably stable, G[BOND]C pairing in alanyl peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) occurs in three possible pairing modes depending on the conditions. G/C alternating alanyl PNA oligomers can form linear, bandlike, higher order structure when the sequence overlap (see schematic representation on the right).

    22. Stable Free Dianionic Silico[BOND]Carbon Clusters (pages 1889–1891)

      Andreas Dreuw, Dr. Thomas Sommerfeld and Prof. Dr. Lorenz S. Cederbaum

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718891

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      Structural characteristics significantly different to those of neutral Si[BOND]C clusters are exhibited by isolated dianionic Si[BOND]C clusters. The theoretical investigation of small, stable dianionic Si[BOND]C clusters indicates that the free dianions SiCmath image (1) and Simath image (2) are capable of existence. These molecules are predicted to be sufficiently long-lived that they should be observable in a mass spectrometer.

    23. Multidentate, Cyclic Phosphorus Ligands with a Silicon[BOND]Phosphorus Backbone: Template Synthesis of a 1,4,7-Triphospha-2,3,5,6,8,9-hexasilacyclononane and a 1,3,5,7,9,11-Hexaphospha-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexasilacyclododecane (pages 1892–1894)

      Prof. Dr. Matthias Driess, Dipl.-Chem. Markus Faulhaber and Dr. Hans Pritzkow

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718921

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      The right template makes it possible: a one-pot cyclocondensation starting from fac-[Mo(CO)3(PH2R)3] (R = cyclohexyl), nBuLi, and 1,2-dichlorotetramethyldisilane gives complex 1 in 48% yield. This is the first complex with a nine-membered tridentate phosphorus ligand. The surprising “fusion” of two 1,3,5-triphospha-2,4,6-trisilacyclohexanes in the presence of CuI and AgI triflates leads to binuclear complexes with an unprecedented hexadentate phosphorus ligand.

    24. Sn6(PR)6], [Sn3(Pr)2, and [Cu24(PR)12] (R = Triorganoisilyl): New Tin and Copper Phosphanediyl Clusters (pages 1894–1896)

      Prof. Dr. Matthias Driess, Dipl.-Chem. Stefan Martin, Dr. Klaus Merz, Dr. Vassili Pintchouk, Dr. Hans Pritzkow, Prog. Dr. Hansjörg Grützmacher and Dr. Martin Kaupp

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718941

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      New structural motifs for main group or transition metal phosphanediyl clusters are obtained for the title compounds 1, 2, and 3. They are synthesized by complex Brønsted acid–base reactions of the corresponding primary silylphosphanes and inert stannanediyl derivatives or [{CuOtBu}4]. None of the three compounds needs terminal donor ligands on the metal centers to aid stability. R = triorganosilyl.

    25. Eight-Coordinate [Bis(oxyiminodiactate titanium(IV)]2− and Nine-Coordinate [Bis(oxyiminodiacetate)aquazirconium(IV)]2−; Variation in Coordination Mode in Amavadin-Like Complexes (pages 1897–1898)

      Dr. Spencer M. Harben, Dr. Paul D. Smith, Roy L. Beddoes, Dr. David Collison and Prof. Dr. C. David Garner

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718971

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      N-hydroxyiminodiacetic acid (H3(hida) reacts with [TiO(acac)2] or [Zr)acac)4] to form [Ti(hida)2]2− or These complexes crystallize from water with Ca2+ counter ions in the form of extended networks. The metal center in the TiIV complex is eight-coordinate, whereas the larger ZrIV center is nine-coordinated with ligation of an additional H2O molecule (see picture on the right).

    26. Synthesis, Structure, and Conformational Features of α-Cycloaltrin: A Cycloeligosaccharide with Alternating 4C1/1C4 Pyranoid Chairs (pages 1899–1902)

      Prof. Yasuyoshi Nogami, Kyoko Nasu, Prof. Toshitaka Koga, Kazuko Ohta, Prof. Kahee Fujita, Dr. Stefan Immel, Prof. Dr. Hans J. Lindner, Dipl.-Ing. Guido E. Schmitt and Prof. Dr. Frieder W. Lichtenthaler

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199718991

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      A cavity closed on one side is evident in the solid-state structure of α-cycloaltrin (see picture on the right). This novel non-glucose cyclooligosaccharide is constructed of alternating 1C4 and 4C1 chair conformations of the altropyranoid rings. In aqueous solution an equilibrium between the 1C4 and 0S2 (skew) forms is established. α-Cycloaltrin is prepared from α-Cyclodextrin in a straightforward four-step protocol in which the 2,3-anhydro-α-cyclomannin is the key intermediate.

    27. Selenoboratoborates [B12(BSe3)6]8−: A New Class of Chalcogen-Substituted Icosahedral Boron Clusters (pages 1903–1904)

      Dr. Jörm Küper, Dipl.-Chem. Olaf Conrad and Prof. Dr. Bernt Krebs

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199719031

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      closo-Borate and selenoborate substructures are simultaneously present in the novel cesium hexaselenoborato-closo-dodecaborate Cs8[B12(BSe3)6] (structure of the anion depicted on the right). In this compound, which is accessible through solid-state syntheses, boron clusters and boron-chalcogen compounds are linked together for the first time. The B12 icosahedron in this borate is completely substituted with chalcogen atoms.

    28. The Self-Assembly of a Switchable [2]Rotaxane (pages 1904–1907)

      Dr. M.-Victoria Martínez-Díaz, Dr. Neil Spencer and Prof. J. Fraser Stoddart

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199719041

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      A secondary dialkylammonium center and a bipyridinium unit form the two binding sites within the dumbbell-shaped component of a switchable [2]rotaxane. The shuttling of the dibenzo[24]crown-8 ring along the dumbbell so that it interacts either with the ammonium center or with the bipyridinium unit can be controlled by the pH and is reversible (depicted schematically on the right). Deprotonation of the NHmath image center is achieved with diisopropylethylamine, and reprotonation with trifluoroacetic acid.

  5. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Reviews
    4. Highlights
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Book Review: Dictionary of Renewable Resources. Edited by H. Zoebelein (pages 1909–1910)

      Stefan Kubik and Günter Wulff

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.199719092

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