Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 45 Issue 45

November 20, 2006

Volume 45, Issue 45

Pages 7475–7643

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Azumamides A–E: Histone Deacetylase Inhibitory Cyclic Tetrapeptides from the Marine Sponge Mycale izuensis / Total Synthesis of Azumamides A and E Z602047 Z602033 (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45/2006) (page 7475)

      Yoichi Nakao, Satoru Yoshida, Shigeki Matsunaga, Nobuaki Shindoh, Yoh Terada, Koji Nagai, Jun K. Yamashita, A. Ganesan, Rob W. M. van Soest, Nobuhiro Fusetani, Irene Izzo, Nakia Maulucci, Giuseppe Bifulco and Francesco De Riccardis

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200690154

      Inhibitory activity against histone deacetylase is displayed by the newly discovered natural products azumamides A–E, isolated from the marine sponge Mycale izuensis, shown in the background of the cover picture. The total synthesis of azumamides A and E is reported and has allowed the stereochemical structure of the azumamides to be established. For more information on these natural products, see the Communications by N. Fusetani and co-workers and by I. Izzo, F. De Riccardis et al. on pages 7553 ff. and 7557 ff., respectively.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
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      [NEt4][AuCl2][AuCl3]: Solid-State Evidence of Essentially Y-Shaped Jahn–Teller-Distorted AuCl3 (page 7489)

      Kevin R. Flower, Robin G. Pritchard and Alan T. McGown

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200690156

      This article corrects:

      [NEt4][AuCl2][AuCl3]: Solid-State Evidence of Essentially Y-Shaped Jahn–Teller-Distorted AuCl31

      Vol. 45, Issue 39, 6535–6537, Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2006

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  5. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  6. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Metamorphosis of Tetrapyrrole Macrocycles (pages 7492–7495)

      Mathias O. Senge and Natalia N. Sergeeva

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603249

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      I don't like what I am: An example of ring-size change in tetrapyrroles is found in the ring expansion of corroles to porphyrins (see scheme). These and other recently discovered relationships between tetrapyrrole structures offer the possibility of rapid autoconversion of such macrocycles.

  7. Minireview

    1. Top of page
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    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
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    10. Communications
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    1. Cupreines and Cupreidines: An Emerging Class of Bifunctional Cinchona Organocatalysts (pages 7496–7504)

      Tommaso Marcelli, Jan H. van Maarseveen and Henk Hiemstra

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602318

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      Hidden functionality: Cleavage of the C6′ methoxy group in cinchona alkaloids affords organocatalysts with a phenolic OH group. Despite its position far away from the stereocenters, this hydroxy group proves crucial to obtain high enantioselectivity in many synthetically relevant reactions.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
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    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Book Review
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    1. Modern Aldol Methods for the Total Synthesis of Polyketides (pages 7506–7525)

      Bernd Schetter and Rainer Mahrwald

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602780

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      A couple of variations: The aldol reaction is one of the most important methods in organic synthesis for the stereoselective formation of polyketide natural products such as erythromycin (see scheme). This Review presents modern variants of this reaction, including the application of metal enolates as well as metal-catalyzed, organocatalytic, and biocatalytic methods.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
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    1. Self-Assembled Vesicles from an Amphiphilic ortho-Phenylene Ethynylene Macrocycle (pages 7526–7530)

      Sang Hyuk Seo, Ji Young Chang and Gregory N. Tew

      Version of Record online: 26 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200600688

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      A triangular macrocycle based on ortho-phenylene ethynylene with polar ethylene oxide side chains spontaneously self-assembles into vesicles upon exposure of solutions in chloroform to water. These self-assembled structures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The self-assembly of disklike macrocycles into spherical vesicles represents a new molecular architecture for vesicle formation.

    2. Tilt the Molecule and Change the Chemistry: Mechanism of S-Promoted Chemoselective Catalytic Hydrogenation of Crotonaldehyde on Cu(111) (pages 7530–7534)

      May E. Chiu, David J. Watson, Georgios Kyriakou, Mintcho S. Tikhov and Richard M. Lambert

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603408

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      Tilt it a little: X-ray absorption spectroscopy and photoemission were used to elucidate the mechanism of promoter action in the Cu-catalyzed chemoselective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde. Sulfur adatoms electronically perturb the C[DOUBLE BOND]O bond and tilt the C[DOUBLE BOND]C bond away from the surface, thus activating the former and rendering the latter inert to hydrogenation. Quantitative conversion of the reactant with 100 % selectivity may be achieved.

    3. Fabrication of Hollow Capsules Composed of Poly(methyl methacrylate) Stereocomplex Films (pages 7534–7536)

      Toshiyuki Kida, Masataka Mouri and Mitsuru Akashi

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602116

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      A hollow victory: Hollow capsules of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) stereocomplex can be fabricated by a combination of the layer-by-layer assembly technique and the silica template method (see scheme; it=isotactic, st=syndiotactic). A hollow nanostructure composed of nonionic multilayers is constructed through van der Waals interactions.

    4. Rolling-Circle Amplification of a DNA Nanojunction (pages 7537–7539)

      Chenxiang Lin, Mingyi Xie, Julian J. L. Chen, Yan Liu and Hao Yan

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602113

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      Armed forces: The rolling-circle amplification method has been used to replicate a four-arm DNA nanojunction. Under appropriate conditions, the DNA nano-objects can be replicated efficiently and correctly, therefore opening a new avenue for large-scale enzymatic synthesis of DNA nanostructures.

    5. A Simple Nanomixer for Single-Molecule Kinetics Measurements (pages 7540–7543)

      Samuel S. White, Shankar Balasubramanian, David Klenerman and Liming Ying

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602289

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      Mix it up a little bit: A diffusive nanomixer for single-molecule studies has been developed that allows single-molecule fluorescence studies to be performed under nonequilibrium conditions in free solution without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio. This method has been used for direct monitoring by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer of the conformations of a quadruplex during unfolding.

    6. Induction of Liquid Crystallinity by Self-Assembled Molecular Boxes (pages 7543–7546)

      Alessio Piermattei, Marcel Giesbers, Antonius T. M. Marcelis, Eduardo Mendes, Stephen J. Picken, Mercedes Crego-Calama and David N. Reinhoudt

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602870

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      Jewel-box: In a hierarchical process, three molecules of a calix[4]arene (blue) and six of barbituric or cyanuric acid (green) assemble into double-rosette boxes, which assemble into columns, which in turn assemble into columnar liquid-crystalline phases (see picture). The resulting mesophases have a remarkable thermal stability and a high degree of order.

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      Screening for Inclusion Compounds and Systematic Construction of Three-Component Solids by Liquid-Assisted Grinding (pages 7546–7550)

      Tomislav Friščić, Andrew V. Trask, William Jones and W. D. Samuel Motherwell

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603235

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      Back to the grind: Three-component solids are prepared by neat and liquid-assisted grinding. Various solid or liquid guests are incorporated into a caffeine/succinic acid host framework. These grinding methods are superior to solution crystallization for the screening of ternary inclusion compounds.

    8. Structure of a Discrete Dichloride Hexahydrate Cube as a Tris(diisopropylamino)cyclopropenium Salt (pages 7550–7553)

      James R. Butchard, Owen J. Curnow, David J. Garrett and Robert G. A. R. Maclagan

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603547

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      Overcoming repulsion: Two chloride anions are glued together by six Cl⋅⋅⋅H[BOND]O hydrogen bonds in the stable dichloride hydrate cube [Cl2(H2O)6]2−. The solid-state structure of the cluster determined by X-ray diffraction of its salt (see picture; Cl green, O red, H white) is consistent with the gas-phase structures calculated at two levels of theory.

    9. Azumamides A–E: Histone Deacetylase Inhibitory Cyclic Tetrapeptides from the Marine Sponge Mycale izuensis (pages 7553–7557)

      Yoichi Nakao, Satoru Yoshida, Shigeki Matsunaga, Nobuaki Shindoh, Yoh Terada, Koji Nagai, Jun K. Yamashita, A. Ganesan, Rob W. M. van Soest and Nobuhiro Fusetani

      Version of Record online: 18 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602047

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      A zoom in on azumamides (1): Azumamides A–E are five new cyclic tetrapeptides isolated from the marine sponge Mycale izuensis. The azumamides display inhibitory activity toward histone deacetylase with IC50 values of 0.045–1.3 μg mL−1. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical degradation.

    10. Total Synthesis of Azumamides A and E (pages 7557–7560)

      Irene Izzo, Nakia Maulucci, Giuseppe Bifulco and Francesco De Riccardis

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602033

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      A zoom in on azumamides (2): An efficient synthetic route for two of the newly discovered marine natural products, namely azumamides A and E, has been developed (see picture). The present synthesis was followed by determination of the stereochemical structure of the azumamides.

    11. How Flexible Are Poly(para-phenyleneethynylene)s? (pages 7560–7564)

      Adelheid Godt, Miriam Schulte, Herbert Zimmermann and Gunnar Jeschke

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602807

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      Magnetic ends: By measuring the distribution of distances between two spin labels it is possible to quantify the flexibility of shape-persistent molecules (see picture). It is found that even the flexibility of short oligomers is described well by the wormlike-chain model.

    12. A Highly Efficient Palladium Nanocatalyst Anchored on a Magnetically Functionalized Polymer-Nanotube Support (pages 7564–7567)

      Sungrok Ko and Jyongsik Jang

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602456

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      Magnetic and catalytic: Both of these properties are shown by the title system, which can be readily prepared by vapor-deposition polymerization and subsequent chemical reduction of FeIII and PdII salts on carboxylated polypyrrole nanotubes (CPPy NT; see picture). These supported Pd nanocatalysts exhibit excellent catalytic activity and reusability in the Heck coupling reaction. MCPPy NT: magnetic carboxylated polypyrrole nanotube.

    13. Single-Crystal Nanotubes of II3–V2 Semiconductors (pages 7568–7572)

      Guozhen Shen, Yoshio Bando, Changhui Ye, Xiaoli Yuan, Takashi Sekiguchi and Dmitri Golberg

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602636

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      Upon thermal evaporation of a mixture of ZnS or CdS with P and Mn3P2 powders, nanotubes of II3–V2 semiconductors (Zn3P2 or Cd3P2) morph around metal nanorods that are formed in situ. These thin-walled nanotubes are single crystals with open ends, circular cross sections, and uniform diameters (see picture).

    14. Evidence of Fluoride Transfer from the Anion of [Zr{C5H3[SiMe21-NtBu)]2}]+[RB(C6F5)3] Complexes to the Zirconocenium Cation (pages 7572–7574)

      Jesús Cano, María Sudupe, Pascual Royo and Marta E. G. Mosquera

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602694

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      C[BOND]F bond activation: In the presence of a phosphane, deactivation of cationic zirconium complexes can occur by direct fluoride migration to the zirconium center, that is, the breaking of a C[BOND]F bond—the strongest bond of organic molecules—without previous C6F5 transfer to the metal atom (see picture).

    15. Dialkylphosphates as Stereodirecting Protecting Groups in Oligosaccharide Synthesis (pages 7575–7578)

      Takeshi Yamada, Kazunobu Takemura, Jun-ichi Yoshida and Shigeru Yamago

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602699

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      Double duty: A phosphoric ester at the C2 position in glycosyl donors directs the glycosylation to occur selectively at the anomeric carbon atom with complete 1,2-trans selectivity. Since the phosphoric ester can be removed to give the hydroxy function, this group serves as a stereodirecting protecting group in oligosaccharide synthesis.

    16. Grafting Short Peptides onto Polybutadiene-block-poly(ethylene oxide): A Platform for Self-Assembling Hybrid Amphiphiles (pages 7578–7581)

      Yan Geng, Dennis E. Discher, Justyna Justynska and Helmut Schlaad

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602739

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      The attachment of a hydrophobic peptide onto polybutadiene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) shifts the assembly morphologies in water towards those with lower curvatures, namely, from spherical micelles to wormlike micelles and vesicles (see picture; wEO: weight fraction of the hydrophilic PEO block; PEO=poly(ethylene oxide); PBD=polybutadiene). Helical superstructures also arise from peptide interactions inside the hydrophobic core.

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      Nucleophilic Catalysis of Oxime Ligation (pages 7581–7584)

      Anouk Dirksen, Tilman M. Hackeng and Philip E. Dawson

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602877

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      Aniline acts as a nucleophilic catalyst of oxime ligation in aqueous solution through formation of the orange-colored intermediate. The method is demonstrated by acceleration of the oxime ligation of peptides at pH 4.5 and pH 7, which extends the scope of this reaction to conditions relevant for the bioconjugation of macromolecules (see scheme).

    18. Silica-Immobilized Chromium Colloids for Cyclohexane Autoxidation (pages 7584–7588)

      Eric Breynaert, Ive Hermans, Bert Lambie, Guido Maes, Jozef Peeters, André Maes and Pierre Jacobs

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602736

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      In a stable condition: Oxyhydroxide colloids of chromium deposited on silica gel are selective, stable catalysts for the autoxidation of cyclohexane (CyH). The CrIII colloids, generated in situ, are immobilized by a column precipitation chromatographic technique (see picture). An increased yield of cyclohexanone (QO) is obtained.

    19. Single Nonblinking CdTe Quantum Dots Synthesized in Aqueous Thiopropionic Acid (pages 7588–7591)

      Hua He, Huifeng Qian, Chaoqing Dong, Kanglin Wang and Jicun Ren

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602758

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      Blinking marvelous! In contrast to quantum dots (QDs) synthesized in organic solutions, CdTe QDs synthesized in aqueous solutions containing thiopropionic acid do not blink. The fluorescence of these QDs is steady under continuous laser excitation (see picture, the gray line is the background intensity). The presence of thio groups on the surface of the QDs is key to their antiblinking behavior.

    20. Highly Active Chiral Ruthenium Catalysts for Asymmetric Cross- and Ring-Opening Cross-Metathesis (pages 7591–7595)

      Jacob M. Berlin, Steven D. Goldberg and Robert H. Grubbs

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602469

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      Metathesis takes sides: The scope of asymmetric metathesis has been expanded with the use of chiral ruthenium catalysts for asymmetric ring-opening cross-metathesis and for the first example of an asymmetric cross-metathesis (see scheme, TIPS=triisopropylsilyl). Information about the mechanism of asymmetric ring-opening cross-metathesis should allow the development of more selective catalysts.

    21. Gold(I)- and Gold(III)-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization of Allenynes: A Remarkable Halide Effect (pages 7596–7599)

      Gilles Lemière, Vincent Gandon, Nicolas Agenet, Jean-Philippe Goddard, Ariel de Kozak, Corinne Aubert, Louis Fensterbank and Max Malacria

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602189

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      Chloride ligands are crucial in the gold-catalyzed cycloisomerization of allenynes to give hydrindienes such as 1, which are formally products of C[BOND]H activation and formed completely selectively over the usual Alder-ene products (2; see scheme). This effect could be rationalized by a DFT study that sheds new light on the electrophilic metal-catalyzed cycloisomerization of polyunsaturated systems.

    22. Asymmetric Conjugate Addition to α-Halo Enones: Dramatic Effect of Styrene on the Enantioselectivity (pages 7600–7603)

      Kangying Li and Alexandre Alexakis

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602417

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      A simple trick could prove generally valuable for asymmetric copper-catalyzed conjugate addition reactions. It was found that the enantioselectivities of such reactions of dialkyl zinc reagents with α-halo enones in the presence of chiral phosphorimidite ligands were dramatically improved upon the addition of styrene, which acts as a radical scavenger to suppress the competitive non-asymmetric radical pathway (see example).

    23. MFI Zeolite with Small and Uniform Intracrystal Mesopores (pages 7603–7606)

      Hui Wang and Thomas J. Pinnavaia

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602595

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      The nucleation of a ZSM-5 zeolite in the presence of silylated polyethylenimine polymers affords composite crystals that contain phase-segregated polymer. Calcination of the crystals results in zeolites with uniform intracrystal mesopores smaller than 10 nm, which are ideally suited for size-selective catalytic conversions of large molecules.

    24. Highly Diastereo- and Enantioselective Formal Conjugate Addition of Nitroalkanes to Nitroalkenes by Chiral Ammonium Bifluoride Catalysis (pages 7606–7608)

      Takashi Ooi, Saki Takada, Kanae Doda and Keiji Maruoka

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602787

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      A matter of control: A chiral quaternary ammonium bifluoride catalyst in combination with silyl nitronates results in the highly diastereo- and enantioselective formal conjugate addition of nitroalkanes to nitroalkenes (see scheme). The resulting 1,3-dinitro compounds bear two defined stereocenters, which can serve as versatile chiral building blocks in organic synthesis.

    25. Total Synthesis of (±)-Quadrangularin A (pages 7609–7611)

      Wenling Li, Hao Li, Ying Li and Zijie Hou

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603097

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      The key to successful coupling in the synthesis of (±)-quadrangularin A (1) was the introduction of tert-butyl groups in the precursor to block two reactive positions. Thus, the oxidative coupling of 3,5-di-(tert-butyl)resveratrol was carried out regioselectively in an efficient total synthesis of the natural product.

    26. Diamagnetic–Paramagnetic Conversion of Tris(2-pyridylthio)methylcopper(III) through a Structural Change from Trigonal Bipyramidal to Octahedral (pages 7611–7614)

      Ryoko Santo, Riichi Miyamoto, Rika Tanaka, Takanori Nishioka, Kazunobu Sato, Kazuo Toyota, Makoto Obata, Shigenobu Yano, Isamu Kinoshita, Akio Ichimura and Takeji Takui

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603127

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      All change: The stable, diamagnetic, trigonal-bipyramidal CuIII complex (see picture) arising from one-electron oxidation of a CuII complex undergoes conversion into a paramagnetic octahedral CuIII complex upon addition of Cl ions. Characterization of the complexes and density functional calculations indicate that the initial one-electron oxidation is metal- rather than ligand-centered.

    27. Synthesis and Structure of a Triruthenium Complex Containing a Face-Capping Pyridine Ligand (pages 7615–7618)

      Takashi Kawashima, Toshiro Takao and Hiroharu Suzuki

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603447

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      Localized protonation: The title complex was prepared by the reaction of a triruthenium pentahydrido complex with pyridine. This compound is the heterocyclic analogue of the face-capping benzene complex, but its reactivity with a protic acid (see scheme) was considerably different from that of the benzene complex owing to the lone pair of electrons at the nitrogen atom.

    28. A Second-Generation Catalyst for Intermolecular Hydroacylation of Alkenes and Alkynes Using β-S-Substituted Aldehydes: The Role of a Hemilabile P-O-P Ligand (pages 7618–7622)

      Gemma L. Moxham, Helen E. Randell-Sly, Simon K. Brayshaw, Robert L. Woodward, Andrew S. Weller and Michael C. Willis

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603133

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      Top of the P-O-Ps: Stabilization of a cationic rhodium catalyst with the hemilabile P-O-P ligand dpephos allows efficient intermolecular hydroacylation of challenging substrates (see scheme). Structural studies have established the role of the coordination of the oxygen atom, and a catalytically competent acyl–hydridorhodium intermediate was fully characterized.

    29. Synthesis of the Southern FGHI Ring System of Azaspiracid-1 and Investigation into the Controlling Elements of C28- and C36-Ketalization (pages 7622–7626)

      Xiao-Ti Zhou, Liang Lu, Daniel P. Furkert, Charles E. Wells and Rich G. Carter

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603353

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      Heading south: An efficient approach to the FGHI southern ring system of azaspiracid-1 is disclosed. Each of the eight stereogenic centers is generated with excellent diastereoselectivity. In addition, the stereochemical outcome of the ketalization steps could be controlled by careful selection of the conditions. Teoc=2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxycarbonyl; TMS=trimethylsilyl; TIPS=triisopropylsilyl; Bn=benzyl.

    30. A Diaminochlorophosphine for Palladium-Catalyzed Arylations of Amines and Ketones (pages 7627–7630)

      Lutz Ackermann, Julia H. Spatz, Christian J. Gschrei, Robert Born and Andreas Althammer

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602222

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      Sterically hindered substituents on a secondary chlorophosphine 1 prevent formation of a diaminooxophosphine, and thereby allow for highly efficient arylation reactions of amines and α-C-H acidic ketones with (hetero)aryl chlorides.

    31. Formation of an Organometallic Ladderane Derivative by Dynamic Topochemical Reaction Control (pages 7630–7633)

      Jan Paradies, Ingo Greger, Gerald Kehr, Gerhard Erker, Klaus Bergander and Roland Fröhlich

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200601592

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      Coming together at the ends: Bis(butadienylcyclopentadienyl) dichlorozirconium (1) undergoes dynamic topochemical reactions upon photolysis that eventually lead to the formation of ladderane derivative 2 and the organometallic cyclooctadiene derivative 3.

    32. Evolving Thermostable Reverse Transcriptase Activity in a DNA Polymerase Scaffold (pages 7633–7635)

      Katharina B. M. Sauter and Andreas Marx

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602772

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      Active mutants: Thermostable DNA polymerases normally exhibit no significant intrinsic activities to reverse transcribe RNA into DNA. We show that enzymes with significantly increased reverse transcription ability can be generated by directed evolution (see picture).

    33. Synthesis and Structure of Ultrathin Aluminosilicate Films (pages 7636–7639)

      Dario Stacchiola, Sarp Kaya, Jonas Weissenrieder, Helmut Kuhlenbeck, Shamil Shaikhutdinov, Hans-Joachim Freund, Marek Sierka, Tanya Kumanova Todorova and Joachim Sauer

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602670

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      Making films: Ordered aluminosilicate films are grown on a Mo(112) substrate, and their structures are determined through high-resolution experiments and density functional theory calculations. At low Al/Si ratios, aluminum atoms partially replace the silicon atoms of the silica structure. The resulting aluminosilicate film consists of a layer of corner-sharing {SiO4} and {AlO3} units (see picture; Mo gray, Al blue, Si orange, O red).

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    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
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