Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 45 Issue 48

December 11, 2006

Volume 45, Issue 48

Pages 8071–8343

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigenda
    5. Obituary
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Correspondence
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Manufacturing Immunity to Disease in a Test Tube: The Magic Bullet Realized (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 48/2006) (page 8071)

      Richard A. Lerner

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200690167

      In Paul Ehrlich's era selecting an antibody for a specific target was a physical process, involving live animals. R. A. Lerner shows in his Review on page 8106 ff. how combinatorial libraries are the incarnation of Ehrlich's (see inset in the cover picture showing “Der Bücherwurm” by Carl Spitzweg) “magic bullet”, proposed more than 100 years ago, and nowadays hundreds of millions of different antibodies can be provided in a couple of hundred microliters of solution in a test tube.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigenda
    5. Obituary
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Correspondence
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  3. Corrigenda

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigenda
    5. Obituary
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Correspondence
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
  4. Obituary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigenda
    5. Obituary
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Correspondence
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Guy Ourisson (1926–2006) (page 8088)

      Michel Rohmer

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604727

  5. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigenda
    5. Obituary
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Correspondence
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. The Jahn–Teller Effect. By Isaac B. Bersuker. (pages 8089–8090)

      Boris Tsukerblat

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200685413

  6. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigenda
    5. Obituary
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Correspondence
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Rigid Annulated Carbon–Sulfur Structures (pages 8092–8096)

      Tomás Torroba and María García-Valverde

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603461

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Open or closed? The first heterocyclic circulene, octathio[8]circulene, was recently synthesized through a highly efficient sulfurization and pyrolysis sequence (see picture; S yellow, C gray). This macrocyclic compound as well as chiral, helical oligothiophenes are rigid structures that open fascinating possibilities for applications in molecular electronics.

    2. Platinum Complexes Featuring Terminally Bound Ga+ and In+ Ions (pages 8097–8099)

      Simon Aldridge

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603643

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      Alone at the apex: The first metal complexes with Ga+ or In+ cations as terminally bound ligands have recently been synthesized. Structural and computational studies suggest a Lewis acid/base Pt[BOND]Ga interaction for [GaPt(GaCp*)4]+ (1; Pt blue, Ga violet, C gray; ArF=C6H3(CF3)2-3,5). The Group 13 cation therefore functions as an acceptor ligand, with significant components of both σ and π symmetry contributing to the Pt[BOND]Ga linkage.

  7. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigenda
    5. Obituary
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Correspondence
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Enamine-Based Aldol Organocatalysis in Water: Are They Really “All Wet”? (pages 8100–8102)

      Andrew P. Brogan, Tobin J. Dickerson and Kim D. Janda

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200601392

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      Reactionswith,in, oronwater? Despite claims to the contrary, few examples of truly aqueous organocatalysis have been reported. Close examination of the data from recent reports reveals that these reactions likely occur in concentrated organic phases.

    2. In Water or in the Presence of Water? (pages 8103–8104)

      Yujiro Hayashi

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603378

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      What expression best conveys the recent examples of “aqueous” organocatalyzed aldol reactions? It is suggested that a reaction occurs “in water” if the participating reactants are dissolved homogeneously in water (or buffer), or “in the presence of water” if it proceeds in a concentrated organic phase with water present as a second phase that influences the reaction in the former.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigenda
    5. Obituary
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Correspondence
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Manufacturing Immunity to Disease in a Test Tube: The Magic Bullet Realized (pages 8106–8125)

      Richard A. Lerner

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603381

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Diplomatic immunity: Therapeutic antibodies are, arguably, the most important class of new drugs for the treatment of a wide range of illnesses. Combinatorial antibody libraries gives access to antibodies for whatever antigen is desired, with a diversity that exceeds that of the natural repertoire. The methods developed to accomplish this seemingly formidable task now allow construction of antibodies in a test tube to any antigen (see picture).

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigenda
    5. Obituary
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Correspondence
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Synthesis of Platinum Nanocages by Using Liposomes Containing Photocatalyst Molecules (pages 8126–8130)

      Yujiang Song, Robert M. Garcia, Rachel M. Dorin, Haorong Wang, Yan Qiu and John A. Shelnutt

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602403

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      Sphere we go: Unilamellar liposomes containing porphyrin photocatalysts are used to generate novel spherical platinum nanocages. The porous hollow nanospheres are formed by many small joined dendritic platinum nanosheets grown within the confines of the liposomal bilayer. They have 2-nm thick shells and can have outer diameters up to 200 nm, (see TEM image) making them suitable for catalytic and other applications.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Microscopy-Based Mass Measurement of a Single Whole Virus in a Cylindrical Ion Trap (pages 8131–8134)

      Zongxiu Nie, Yan-Kai Tzeng, Huan-Cheng Chang, Chi-Chien Chiu, Chi-Yao Chang, Chia-Ming Chang and Mi-Hua Tao

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603839

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      Weight of the world: Masses of whole viruses with sizes in the range of 80–300 nm were determined for the first time by using a miniature cylindrical ion trap equipped with a transparent end-cap electrode. Three viruses (vaccinia virus, grouper iridovirus, and recombinant human adenovirus) have been successfully examined, suggesting a broad and promising application of this new technology to viral systems.

    3. Lanthanitin: A Chiral Nanoball Encapsulating 18 Lanthanum Ions by Ferritin-Like Assembly (pages 8134–8138)

      Kyung Seok Jeong, Young Shin Kim, Yun Ju Kim, Eunsung Lee, Ji Hye Yoon, Won Hwa Park, Young Woo Park, Seung-Joon Jeon, Zee Hwan Kim, Jaheon Kim and Nakcheol Jeong

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603622

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      A chiral supramolecule, obtained by self-assembly of 24 chiral ditopic carboxylate ligands, 18 La ions, and two carbonate anions, has been dubbed lanthanitin because of its structural resemblance to ferritin. The picture shows the molecular structure of one enantiomer of lanthanitin. Color code: La blue, carbonate C green, C gray, O red; H omitted.

    4. Reversible Control of Carbon Nanotube Aggregation for a Glucose Affinity Sensor (pages 8138–8141)

      Paul W. Barone and Michael S. Strano

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603138

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      There and back: Through the formation of colloidally stable suspensions of dextran-coated single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), it was possible to fabricate an affinity sensor based on SWNT photoluminescence. Aggregation could be controlled through introduction of a glucose-binding protein and glucose, which results in a reversible glucose sensor.

    5. Fluoroproline Flip-Flop: Regiochemical Reversal of a Stereoelectronic Effect on Peptide and Protein Structures (pages 8141–8145)

      Wookhyun Kim, Kenneth I. Hardcastle and Vincent P. Conticello

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603227

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      Pucker up! Structural analysis of the epimeric N-acetyl-(2R,3R)- and N-acetyl-(2R,3S)-3-fluoroproline methyl esters (1 and 2; see scheme) reveals opposing ring puckers that invert the conformational preferences of the corresponding 4-fluoroproline derivatives 3 and 4. Substitution of these fluoroprolines into proteins provides a method for controlling local conformation through stereoelectronic and steric effects.

    6. Imprinted Photonic Polymers for Chiral Recognition (pages 8145–8148)

      Xiaobin Hu, Qi An, Guangtao Li, Shengyang Tao and Jian Liu

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200601849

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      A general protocol to prepare self-reporting photonic polymer films for specific enantiomer recognition is described. The combined molecular imprinting and colloidal crystal approach produces films with interconnected macroporous arrays and cavities that are complementary to the analyte. Binding of the analyte can be directly detected by the change in optical diffraction of the periodic macroporous array (see picture; PB=phosphate buffer).

    7. An Aptamer–Doxorubicin Physical Conjugate as a Novel Targeted Drug-Delivery Platform (pages 8149–8152)

      Vaishali Bagalkot, Omid C. Farokhzad, Robert Langer and Sangyong Jon

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602251

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      Trojan aptamer: A novel strategy for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells was developed through the formation of a physical conjugate (see scheme) between doxorubicin (Dox) and the A10 RNA aptamer that binds to the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). The aptamer–Dox conjugate could efficiently bind to PSMA-expressing cells, thereby resulting in its uptake and the intracellular release of Dox.

    8. Diversity in Guanine-Selective DNA Binding Modes for an Organometallic Ruthenium Arene Complex (pages 8153–8156)

      Hong-Ke Liu, Susan J. Berners-Price, Fuyi Wang, John A. Parkinson, Jingjing Xu, Juraj Bella and Peter J. Sadler

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602873

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      Seek and hide! An organometallic ruthenium arene anticancer complex with ruthenium (pink ball) chelated by ethylenediamine (blue) is selective for guanine bases on DNA and can bury the noncoordinated phenyl ring of its arene ligand (yellow) between bases in the double helix.

    9. Time-Controlled Microfluidic Seeding in nL-Volume Droplets To Separate Nucleation and Growth Stages of Protein Crystallization (pages 8156–8160)

      Cory J. Gerdts, Valentina Tereshko, Maneesh K. Yadav, Irina Dementieva, Frank Collart, Andrzej Joachimiak, Raymond C. Stevens, Peter Kuhn, Anthony Kossiakoff and Rustem F. Ismagilov

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602946

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      Sowing seeds: The growth of well-ordered protein crystals requires control of the two key stages of crystallization, namely, nucleation and growth. However, the ideal conditions for these two stages are often different. A microfluidic system (see picture) was used to perform time-controlled crystal seeding in nL volumes. Single crystals of the protein Oligoendopeptidase F were obtained and used to determine its X-ray crystal structure.

    10. Dual-Mode Nanoparticle Probes for High-Performance Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Imaging of Neuroblastoma (pages 8160–8162)

      Jae-Hyun Lee, Young-wook Jun, Soo-In Yeon, Jeon-Soo Shin and Jinwoo Cheon

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603052

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      Working together: A “core–satellite” hybrid nanoparticle probe provides highly improved fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging capabilities through synergistic enhancement of its respective components. These hybrid nanoprobes can be used for dual-modal fluorescence and MR imaging of neuroblastoma with expressed polysialic acids.

    11. Design, Synthesis, and Spectroscopic Investigation of Zinc Dodecakis(trifluoroethoxy)phthalocyanines Conjugated with Deoxyribonucleosides (pages 8163–8166)

      Mamidi Ramesh Reddy, Norio Shibata, Yuki Kondo, Shuichi Nakamura and Takeshi Toru

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603590

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      The single life: The UV/Vis spectra together with the strong fluorescence emission of trifluoroethoxy-substituted zinc phthalocyanines conjugated with deoxyribonucleosides (see picture) suggest that these compounds prefer monomeric forms over aggregation. Their unique photosensitivity can be controlled by the addition of base or by the solvent used.

    12. Ultrahigh-Resolution Backbone Structure of Perdeuterated Protein GB1 Using Residual Dipolar Couplings from Two Alignment Media (pages 8166–8169)

      Guillaume Bouvignies, Sebastian Meier, Stephan Grzesiek and Martin Blackledge

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603627

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      NMR dipolar couplings can be measured for weakly aligned proteins and are sensitive probes of their structure and dynamics. The combination of fixed geometry and 1H–1H couplings alone from two alignment media provides access to ultrahigh-resolution structures. The apparent precision, as measured by independent cross-validation and structure comparison, is comparable to that available from high-resolution X-ray crystallography.

    13. Induction of Structure and Function in a Designed Peptide upon Adsorption on a Silica Nanoparticle (pages 8169–8173)

      Martin Lundqvist, Patrik Nygren, Bengt-Harald Jonsson and Klas Broo

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200600965

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      Small change: Nanoparticles can induce a functional helix from an unstructured peptide (see picture). The ability to generate stable, well-defined structures on surfaces opens up the possibility of creating nanosystems with a variety of functionalities, which is demonstrated by the introduction of a catalytic site for ester hydrolysis.

    14. Control of Main-Chain Stiffness of a Helical Poly(phenylacetylene) by Switching On and Off the Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding through Macromolecular Helicity Inversion (pages 8173–8176)

      Kento Okoshi, Shin-ichiro Sakurai, Sousuke Ohsawa, Jiro Kumaki and Eiji Yashima

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603663

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      A hard twist: A helical poly(phenylacetylene) with L- or D-alanine pendants with a long alkyl chain showed an unprecedented change in the main-chain stiffness accompanied by inversion of the helical sense of the polymer, resulting from the “on and off” fashion of the intramolecular hydrogen-bonding networks in polar and nonpolar solvents.

    15. Dancing on a Fullerene Surface: Isomerization of Y3N@(N-Ethylpyrrolidino-C80) from the 6,6 to the 5,6 Regioisomer (pages 8176–8180)

      Antonio Rodríguez-Fortea, Josep M. Campanera, Claudia M. Cardona, Luis Echegoyen and Josep M. Poblet

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604052

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      Dancing partners: Density functional calculations have been used to unravel the different reactivity of endohedral metallofullerenes M3N@C80 (M=Sc or Y) with respect to 1,3-dipolar N-ethylazomethine cycloaddition. The mechanism for the isomerization of Y3N@(N-ethylpyrrolidino-C80) from the 6,6 to the 5,6 regioisomer during thermalization of the kinetically favored product is proposed to involve a “dancing” of the pyrrolidine on the fullerene surface.

    16. A New Catalytic Route for the Activation of sp-Hybridized Carbon–Hydrogen Bonds (pages 8180–8184)

      Bogdan Marciniec, Beata Dudziec and Ireneusz Kownacki

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603582

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      Vinyl-substituted silicon compounds react selectively with terminal alkynes in the presence of complexes containing [Ru][BOND]H and [Ru][BOND]Si bonds to form functionalized silylethynes (see picture). This reaction opens up a new catalytic route for the preparation of a class of potent organosilicon reagents for organic synthesis.

    17. Cationic Rare-Earth Polyhydrido Complexes: Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Activity for the cis-1,4-Selective Polymerization of 1,3-Cyclohexadiene (pages 8184–8188)

      Xiaofang Li, Jens Baldamus, Masayoshi Nishiura, Olivier Tardif and Zhaomin Hou

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603450

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      Rare activity from rare earths: Cationic rare-earth hydrides show regio- and stereoselectivity for the polymerization of 1,3-cyclohexadiene (CHD) to afford soluble crystalline cis-1,4-linked poly(CHD) that was previously unavailable. These cationic clusters are made by treating the corresponding neutral complexes with a borate activator (see scheme; Cp′: C5Me4SiMe3).

    18. Relativistic Functional Groups: Aryl Carbon–Gold Bond Formation by Selective Transmetalation of Boronic Acids (pages 8188–8191)

      David V. Partyka, Matthias Zeller, Allen D. Hunter and Thomas G. Gray

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603350

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      Gilded organometallics: Carbon–gold bond formation occurs selectively and in high yields upon reaction of gold(I) bromides with arylboronic acids in the presence of Cs2CO3. The reaction is broadly tolerant of sensitive functionalities. The resulting aryl gold(I) compounds are stable to air and water.

    19. The Diagnostic Substrate Bicyclohexane Reveals a Radical Mechanism for Bacterial Cytochrome P450 in Whole Cells (pages 8192–8194)

      Rachel N. Austin, Dayi Deng, Yongying Jiang, Kate Luddy, Jan B. van Beilen, Paul R. Ortiz de Montellano and John T. Groves

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603282

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      On home ground: The reaction mechanisms of bacterial alkane-oxidizing cytochrome P450s were determined in their native environment using a novel diagnostic substrate probe, bicyclohexane, in whole cells and cell-free extracts (see picture). Purified P450cam also oxidizes bicyclohexane. Clear evidence for a substrate-based radical with a lifetime of 75–250 ps was obtained.

    20. Selective Platination of Modified Oligonucleotides and Duplex Cross-Links (pages 8194–8197)

      Berta Algueró, Jaime López de la Osa, Carlos González, Enrique Pedroso, Vicente Marchán and Anna Grandas

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603128

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      Stabilizing strands: Selectively cross-linked duplexes can be obtained either by hybridization-promoted rearrangement of platinated oligonucleotides or by annealing thioether- and imidazole-modified oligonucleotides and their complementary chains in the presence of transplatin (see structure).

    21. Redox Targeting of Insulating Electrode Materials: A New Approach to High-Energy-Density Batteries (pages 8197–8200)

      Qing Wang, Shaik M. Zakeeruddin, Deyu Wang, Ivan Exnar and Michael Grätzel

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602891

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      A compact energy-storage system based on redox targeting is proposed, by which insulating LiFePO4 particles can be reversibly charged and discharged by redox shuttle molecules (S; see scheme) even in the absence of conducting additives. The energy density of such batteries is expected to be greatly improved.

    22. Chemo- and Regioselective Preparation and Reaction of a Kinetic Zinc Enolate Formed from a Thiol Ester and Bis(iodozincio)methane (pages 8200–8203)

      Zenichi Ikeda, Takaharu Hirayama and Seijiro Matsubara

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602950

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      Reactive functionalized enolates that are otherwise difficult to obtain can be prepared in a simple procedure by the treatment of a thiol ester with bis(iodozincio)methane in the presence of a palladium catalyst (see scheme). The terminal zinc enolates thus formed are kinetically controlled and react with a variety of electrophiles, such as aldehydes, ketones, and acyl cyanides. FG=functional group.

    23. trans Influences on Hypervalent Bonding of Aryl λ3-Iodanes: Their Stabilities and Isodesmic Reactions of Benziodoxolones and Benziodazolones (pages 8203–8206)

      Masahito Ochiai, Takuya Sueda, Kazunori Miyamoto, Paul Kiprof and Viktor V. Zhdankin

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603055

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      Large and small or twice moderate: Both combinations of trans influences of the substituents favor the formation of highly stable aryl λ3-iodanes ArILL′ (examples: PhI(OH)OTs and PhI(OAc)2). trans influences also seem to explain why iodosylbenzene adopts an oxo-bridged zigzag polymer structure in contrast to PhI(OH)2, which is monomeric.

    24. De Novo Design and Synthesis of Helix–Turn–Helix Structure from Short and Robust Mixed Helices Derived from C-Linked Carbo-β-Amino Acids (pages 8207–8210)

      Gangavaram V. M. Sharma, Velaparthi Subash, Kongari Narsimulu, Ampapathi Ravi Sankar and Ajit C. Kunwar

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603084

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      In a twist: Tethering of short peptides with robust 10/12-mixed helices, derived from C-linked carbo-β-amino acids, to the turn-inducing motif, β-hGly-D-Pro-Gly-β-hGly, permitted a de novo design of the helix–turn–helix motif in the foldamer domain.

    25. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by Noncovalent Peptide–Tripyrrole Conjugates (pages 8210–8214)

      Juan B. Blanco, Verónica I. Dodero, M. Eugenio Vázquez, Manuel Mosquera, Luis Castedo and José L. Mascareñas

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603115

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      To join the groove: Equipping basic-region bZIP peptides with a noncovalent heterodimerizing unit allows their major-groove DNA-binding capability to be triggered upon addition of appropriate external ligands that bind into adjacent minor-groove sites. The resulting noncovalent hybrids bind relatively long DNA sites with good affinity and very high specificity.

    26. Inverse Axial-Ligand Effects in the Activation of H2O2 and ROOH by an MnIII Corrolazine (pages 8214–8217)

      David E. Lansky, Amy A. Narducci Sarjeant and David P. Goldberg

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603139

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      Upside-down push: Reaction of an MnIII corrolazine complex with H2O2 or ROOH leads to O[BOND]O-bond cleavage to give an MnV[TRIPLE BOND]O complex (see scheme). Dramatic and unexpected axial-ligand (or “push”) effects are observed, namely, the more electron-poor the axial ligand L, the faster and more heterolytic the cleavage.

    27. Polyol Synthesis through Hydrocarbon Oxidation: De Novo Synthesis of L-Galactose (pages 8217–8220)

      Dustin J. Covell, Nicolaas A. Vermeulen, Nathan A. Labenz and M. Christina White

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603321

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      Carbohydrates from hydrocarbons: A hydrocarbon oxidation strategy for the synthesis of chiral polyols is validated by the enantioselective, de novo synthesis of differentially protected L-galactose (see scheme, TBS=tert-butyldimethylsilyl, Bn=benzyl). Key to this strategy is the selective C[BOND]H oxidation method for transforming protected chiral allylic alcohols into (E)-2-butene-1,4-diol derivatives.

    28. Is the Ferric Hydroperoxy Species Responsible for Sulfur Oxidation in Cytochrome P450s? (pages 8221–8223)

      Max J. Cryle and James J. De Voss

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603411

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      Not the ferryl oxidant? The oxidation of thiafatty acids by P450BM3 (CYP102A1) was shown to be consistent with oxidation by the ferric hydroperoxy species (Cpd 0) rather than the expected ferryl species (Cpd 1). This is the first indication that sulfur oxidation in a wildtype P450 occurs via the hydroperoxy species.

    29. High-Temperature-Stable Catalysts by Hollow Sphere Encapsulation (pages 8224–8227)

      Pablo M. Arnal, Massimiliano Comotti and Ferdi Schüth

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603507

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      Stable companions: Hollow zirconia shells that each contain one gold nanoparticle (see picture) are stable to sintering and can be used as heterogeneous catalysts in reactions such as the oxidation of CO in air. The performance of Au, @ZrO2 is unaffected by calcination at 800 °C.

    30. Hydrogen Storage in the Giant-Pore Metal–Organic Frameworks MIL-100 and MIL-101 (pages 8227–8231)

      Michel Latroche, Suzy Surblé, Christian Serre, Caroline Mellot-Draznieks, Philip L. Llewellyn, Jin-Ho Lee, Jong-San Chang, Sung Hwa Jhung and Gérard Férey

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200600105

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      Large hydrogen-storage capacity at liquid-nitrogen temperature is exhibited by the metal–organic framework MIL-101. In the zeotype architecture of this porous solid (see picture) each intersection of the cages is occupied by a supertetrahedron formed by trimers of chromium octahedra assembled with benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate ligands.

    31. A Versatile Ruthenium Catalyst for C[BOND]C Bond Formation by C[BOND]H Bond Activation (pages 8232–8235)

      Rémi Martinez, Reynald Chevalier, Sylvain Darses and Jean-Pierre Genet

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603786

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      Easily modified: the electronic and steric properties of a ruthenium catalyst highly active for C[BOND]H bond activation (see scheme) can be modified by fine-tuning the ligand. This makes this catalytic system very versatile as it allows functionalization of a variety of substrates. The catalyst is generated in situ from a stable and easily available ruthenium(II) source.

    32. Heterogeneous Copper-in-Charcoal-Catalyzed Click Chemistry (pages 8235–8238)

      Bruce H. Lipshutz and Benjamin R. Taft

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603726

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      Click here for Cu/C: Copper-in-charcoal (Cu/C) is an active catalyst for effecting click reactions between organic azides and 1-alkynes. Rates of cycloaddition are increased dramatically when carried out in the presence of Et3N or using microwave assistance. There is no sensitivity to air or moisture, and the catalyst can be recycled several times without loss of activity or selectivity for the 1,4-adduct.

    33. A New Non-Centrosymmetric Modification of BiB3O6 (pages 8239–8241)

      Johanna S. Knyrim, Petra Becker, Dirk Johrendt and Hubert Huppertz

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602993

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      Working under pressure: BiB3O6 is a well-known material with nonlinear optical properties. The use of high-pressure/high-temperature conditions led to the synthesis of a new non-centrosymmetric bismuth triborate (δ-BiB3O6). The picture shows a six-membered ring in the crystal structure of δ-BiB3O6 (orange spheres: Bi, blue spheres: O, red spheres: B).

    34. Gold Catalysts: Nanoporous Gold Foams (pages 8241–8244)

      Volkmar Zielasek, Birte Jürgens, Christian Schulz, Jürgen Biener, Monika M. Biener, Alex V. Hamza and Marcus Bäumer

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602484

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No support: Unsupported nanoporous gold foams with a spongelike morphology (see images) are formed through the selective leaching of silver from a gold–silver alloy. These gold foams are highly active catalysts for CO oxidation at ambient pressures and temperatures down to −20 °C, and have potential applications as membrane catalysts.

    35. α- and β-[Fe2(μ-StBu)2(StBu)4]2−: Coexistence of Two Bond-Stretch Isomers of a Classical Bitetrahedral Metal Chalcogenolate Compound (pages 8245–8249)

      Bernd Hammann, Changneng Chen, Ulrich Flörke, Ralf Hauptmann, Eckhard Bill, Sebastian Sinnecker and Gerald Henkel

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200601115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two of a kind: [Fe2(StBu)6]2− shows a new form of isomerism. Besides the isomer of classical structure 1 a (red Fe, yellow S) there is also a variant (1 b) in which the central Fe2S2 rhomb is inverted and the Fe[BOND]S bonds are distinctly shorter. 1 b can be regarded as a transition state during the inversion of the bridging sulfur atoms of 1 a that is stabilized by significant π interactions.

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    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigenda
    5. Obituary
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Correspondence
    9. Review
    10. Communications
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