Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 46 Issue 21

May 18, 2007

Volume 46, Issue 21

Pages 3771–3989

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Obituary
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: A Glycosynthase Catalyst for the Synthesis of Flavonoid Glycosides (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 21/2007) (page 3771)

      Min Yang, Gideon J. Davies and Benjamin G. Davis

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200790091

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      A panoramic library: Multiwell library screening of acceptor structures has allowed the identification of the first examples of glycosynthase enzymes that utilize non-natural substrates. In their Communication on page 3885 ff., G. Davies, B. Davis, and M. Yang show that the novel specificity, activity, and catalytic efficiency of the mutants are comparable with those of natural glycosyltransferases. The cover shows a 360° view of the “multiwell” ceiling of Oxford's Radcliffe Science Library.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Obituary
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Encoding Molecular-Wire Formation within Nanoscale Sockets (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 21/2007) (page 3772)

      Jinyao Tang, Yiliang Wang, Jennifer E. Klare, George S. Tulevski, Shalom J. Wind and Colin Nuckolls

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200790092

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      Coordination chemistry provides a versatile method to form molecular-scale wires between nanoscale electrodes, as S. J. Wind, C. Nuckolls, and co-workers describe in their Communication on page 3892 ff. First, a bifunctional molecule is assembled into a monolayer on the electrode surface such that only one end of the molecule reacts with the electrode, and then a second molecule (e.g. a metal ion, as shown in the picture) is introduced to span the gap between the termini of the closely spaced nanoscale films.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Obituary
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Obituary
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  5. Obituary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Obituary
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Frank Albert Cotton (1930–2007) (page 3790)

      John P. Fackler Jr.

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200701625

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Obituary
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  7. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Obituary
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Feeling the Force of Supramolecular Bonds in Polymers (pages 3794–3796)

      G. Julius Vancso

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604168

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      The power of the Force: The rupture force of supramolecular bonds, as well as the unbinding dynamics of associated polymers, have been studied by AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS). The first quantitative comparison of bond-rupture dynamics from independent AFM-SMFS and NMR data is highlighted.

  8. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Obituary
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Water in Organocatalytic Processes: Debunking the Myths (pages 3798–3800)

      Donna G. Blackmond, Alan Armstrong, Vyv Coombe and Andrew Wells

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604952

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      All this talk of water: Aqueous-based organocatalytic processes involve a complex set of parameters, and a holistic approach is the key to making informed decisions on the benefits on a case-by-case basis. A fundamental mechanistic understanding of the role of water in any reaction is necessary before its general use in organocatalytic reactions may be advocated. Copyright of the picture (water drops 1): Adam Hart-Davis.

  9. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Obituary
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Deprotonative Metalation Using Ate Compounds: Synergy, Synthesis, and Structure Building (pages 3802–3824)

      Robert E. Mulvey, Florence Mongin, Masanobu Uchiyama and Yoshinori Kondo

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604369

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      Crazy ates: Metalations of organic substrates with alkali-metal magnesiates, zincates, and aluminates have opened up new perspectives in synthetic and structural chemistry. This Review covers selected syntheses made possible by application of such “ate” complexes as deprotonation reagents, together with insight into synergetic effects in the syntheses of these species.

    2. In Situ and Operando Spectroscopy for Assessing Mechanisms of Gas Sensing (pages 3826–3848)

      Alexander Gurlo and Ralf Riedel

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602597

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      On the job: What previously seemed impossible, such as monitoring of the processes on working gas sensors, is now possible. Physicochemical processes on an active sensor can be studied under working conditions and in real time (see scheme). This Review covers the in situ and operando methodology for studying the gas-sensing mechanism on semiconducting metal oxides.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Obituary
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Ligand Bridging of the DNA Holliday Junction: Molecular Recognition of a Stacked-X Four-Way Junction by a Small Molecule (pages 3850–3854)

      Anna L. Brogden, Nicholas H. Hopcroft, Mark Searcey and Christine J. Cardin

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603760

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      Planning a Holliday: A new mode of binding to a stacked-X, four-way Holliday junction is described in which a chromophore molecule binds across the center of the junction and two adenine residues are replaced by the acridine chromophores at either side of the crossover. This binding mode is specific for the Holliday junction and does not cause unwinding of the DNA helices.

    2. Chemically Immobilized Single-Stranded Oligonucleotides on Praseodymium Oxide Nanoparticles as an Unlabeled DNA Sensor Probe Using Impedance (pages 3855–3859)

      Sudha Shrestha, Connie M. Y. Yeung, Catherine E. Mills, Jay Lewington and Shik Chi Tsang

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604827

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      A spark of attraction: Ellipsoidal Pr6O11 particles on indium tin oxide (ITO) modified with single-stranded oliogonucleotides act as an unlabeled DNA probe. Upon recognition of complementary bases in solution, an impedance change (capacitance change) is detected. An equivalent impedance change is not obtained upon the addition of an oligonucleotide with slightly mismatched bases.

    3. Chiral N-Heterocyclic Carbenes in Natural Product Synthesis: Application of Ru-Catalyzed Asymmetric Ring-Opening/Cross-Metathesis and Cu-Catalyzed Allylic Alkylation to Total Synthesis of Baconipyrone C (pages 3860–3864)

      Dennis G. Gillingham and Amir H. Hoveyda

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700501

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      Chiral carbenes as major players: Two recently discovered chiral N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes play a crucial role in a concise enantioselective total synthesis of baconipyrone C (see scheme). An (NHC)Cu complex catalyzes a double asymmetric allylic alkylation (AAA), and an (NHC)Ru complex catalyzes an asymmetric ring-opening/cross-metathesis (AROM/CM) to establish the absolute configuration of the target. RCM=ring-closing metathesis.

    4. Charge-Monitoring Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption Mass Spectrometry for Cell and Microparticle Mass Distribution Measurement (pages 3865–3869)

      Wen-Ping Peng, Huan-Chang Lin, Hsin-Hung Lin, Minglee Chu, Alice L. Yu, Huan-Cheng Chang and Chung-Hsuan Chen

      Version of Record online: 13 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700309

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      Mass exodus: A mass spectrometer for the rapid measurement of mass distributions of cells and microparticles is described. A discharge process is used to provide cells with thousands of charges so that direct charge measurement can be achieved. This device was used to measure microparticles with masses as high as 1015 Da and to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells.

    5. CH3ReO3 on γ-Al2O3: Understanding Its Structure, Initiation, and Reactivity in Olefin Metathesis (pages 3870–3873)

      Alain Salameh, Jérôme Joubert, Anne Baudouin, Wayne Lukens, Françoise Delbecq, Philippe Sautet, Jean Marie Basset and Christophe Copéret

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700211

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      A minor species, generated by C[BOND]H activation of the methyl group of CH3ReO3 on reactive surface sites of alumina, is the active site of alumina-supported CH3ReO3, a highly active olefin metathesis catalyst, while the major species, formed by coordination of CH3ReO3 at the same sites, is inactive (see scheme; Os denotes the O atoms of the alumina surface).

    6. Chirality Enrichment through the Heterorecognition of Enantiomers in an Achiral Coordination Host (pages 3874–3876)

      Michito Yoshizawa, Masazumi Tamura and Makoto Fujita

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700103

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      A bowl of pairs: The water-soluble bowl-shaped coordination compound formed from [Pd(en)(NO3)2] (en=ethylenediamine) and tris(3-pyridyl)triazine recognizes preferentially a racemic pair of guest molecules such as 1,1′-bi-2-naphthol. This bimolecular recognition results in chirality enrichment in the organic phase without the need to add another source of chirality (see scheme).

    7. Multiple Reversible Protonation of Polyoxoanion Surfaces: Direct Observation of Dynamic Structural Effects from Proton Transfer (pages 3877–3880)

      Xikui Fang and Craig L. Hill

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700004

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      Back and forth: The two complexes [{P2W15O54(H2O)2}2Zr]12− and [{P2W15O54(H2O)2}Zr{P2W17O61}]14− exhibit extensive dynamic structural changes induced by completely reversible multiple protonation behavior, comparable to the flexing of a muscle (see picture). The pH titration of the former complex indicates a two-step dissociation of all eight protons, in agreement with the structural and spectroscopic studies.

    8. Surface-Chemistry Control To Silence Gene Expression in Drosophila Schneider 2 Cells through RNA Interference (pages 3881–3884)

      Eugene W. L. Chan and Muhammad N. Yousaf

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604079

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      A good combination: RNA interference (RNAi) technology combined with surface chemistry can be used to control RNAi-mediated gene silencing in Drosophila Schneider 2 (S2) cells patterned on tailored self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiolates on gold. The cell population and not the cell confluence was shown to be critical for the effectiveness of RNAi Rho GTPase.

    9. A Glycosynthase Catalyst for the Synthesis of Flavonoid Glycosides (pages 3885–3888)

      Min Yang, Gideon J. Davies and Benjamin G. Davis

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604177

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      Mutant exposed! The synthetic utility of glycosynthase mutant enzymes has been expanded to allow the use of lipophilic acceptors, such as flavonoids, at rates comparable with those of natural glycosyltransferases. Sequential biocatalysis allows access to both di- and monosaccharide-modified products as well as natural product glycoflavonoids.

    10. Construction of an Aryliridium–Salen Complex for Highly cis- and Enantioselective Cyclopropanations (pages 3889–3891)

      Shigefumi Kanchiku, Hidehiro Suematsu, Kazuhiro Matsumoto, Tatsuya Uchida and Tsutomu Katsuki

      Version of Record online: 12 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604385

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      Ringing the changes: Iridium(III)–salen complexes 1 bearing a σ-coordinated aryl ligand (L=CH3C6H4, C6H5) at the apical position are found to efficiently catalyze the cis- and enantioselective cyclopropanation of mono- and disubstituted olefins (see scheme).

    11. Encoding Molecular-Wire Formation within Nanoscale Sockets (pages 3892–3895)

      Jinyao Tang, Yiliang Wang, Jennifer E. Klare, George S. Tulevski, Shalom J. Wind and Colin Nuckolls

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604398

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      Wire straits: Three-component molecular wires were constructed in situ by first assembling a monolayer of a bifunctional arene on the electrode surfaces, such that only one end of the molecule (thiol) reacts with the electrode. Then, a second molecule was used to chemically bridge the gap between the termini of the films. Coordination chemistry in this context provides a versatile method to reversibly form molecular-scale wires (see picture). EDTA=ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

    12. A Room-Temperature Liquid-Crystalline Phase with Crystalline π Stacks (pages 3896–3899)

      Yijin Xu, Siwei Leng, Chenming Xue, Runkun Sun, Jie Pan, Jason Ford and Shi Jin

      Version of Record online: 13 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604607

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      Well stacked: A liquid-crystalline material with crystalline π stacks has been synthesized in which the room-temperature liquid-crystalline phase consists of alternating 2D-crystalline mesogen layers and liquidlike alkyl layers. A long-range ordered layer structure forms as a consequence of the resulting microsegregation (see picture), with the π stacks contributing to the 2D crystalline order that exists within a layer.

    13. Noncovalently Connected Frameworks with Nanoscale Channels Assembled from a Tethered Polyoxometalate–Pyrene Hybrid (pages 3900–3904)

      Yu-Fei Song, De-Liang Long and Leroy Cronin

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604734

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      Porous POMs: Crystallization of a manganese-Anderson-type polyoxometalate (POM) derivatized with two pyrene moieties in the presence of tetrabutylammonium cations produces a nanoporous material with butterfly-shaped channels (O red, Mo green, C black, H white, N blue). The network is held together by very weak C[BOND]H⋅⋅⋅O[DOUBLE BOND]Mo interactions, but is stable to 240 °C and can absorb up to 12 wt % chlorobenzene.

    14. Controlling the Sense of Enantioselection on Surfaces by Conformational Changes of Adsorbed Modifiers (pages 3905–3908)

      Angelo Vargas, Davide Ferri, Norberto Bonalumi, Tamas Mallat and Alfons Baiker

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604776

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      Shapeshifting: The sense of enantioselection in the asymmetric hydrogenation of activated ketones over modified platinum depends on the cinchona-alkaloid modifier (for example, O-phenylcinchonidine; see picture). Spectroscopic and theoretical studies reveal that the chiral space is reshaped through a change in the conformation of the modifier.

    15. A White-Light-Emitting Borate-Based Inorganic–Organic Hybrid Open Framework (pages 3909–3911)

      Ming-Sheng Wang, Guo-Cong Guo, Wen-Tong Chen, Gang Xu, Wei-Wei Zhou, Ke-Jun Wu and Jin-Shun Huang

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604946

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      Intrinsic white borate phosphors: Solvothermal reaction of H3BO3 and ethylenediamine afforded the first three-dimensional zeolite-like ammonium borate. Its blue photoluminescence can be modified to white by a simple heat-treatment process at 250, at 360, or at 250 °C after doping with Eu3+ ions (see picture, left to right). In the absence of solvent, the same solvothermal reaction gave the first amine-pillared layer borate-based framework.

    16. An Alkoxide-Directed Intermolecular [2+2+1] Annulation: A Three-Component Coupling Reaction for the Synthesis of Tetrasubstituted α,β-Unsaturated γ-Lactams (pages 3912–3914)

      Martin McLaughlin, Masayuki Takahashi and Glenn C. Micalizio

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605060

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      In full control: A regio- and stereoselective cross-coupling reaction between internal alkynes and imines that provides selective access to allylic amines and γ-lactams has been developed (see scheme). This intermolecular [2+2+1] process could be described as an alkoxide-directed aza-Pauson–Khand-like annulation. The alkyne can tolerate a wide range of substituents R3.

    17. Enthalpy-Driven Three-State Switching of a Superhydrophilic/Superhydrophobic Surface (pages 3915–3917)

      Shutao Wang, Huajie Liu, Dongsheng Liu, Xinyong Ma, Xiaohong Fang and Lei Jiang

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700439

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      Wet, wet, wet: A responsive surface is presented that can switch between stable superhydrophilic, metastable superhydrophobic, and stable superhydrophobic states by an enthalpy-driven process (see picture). This macroscopic phenomenon of surface wettability originates from the coordinative effect of the collective nanoscale motion of DNA nanodevices and the surface microstructure.

    18. Highly Enantioselective and Diastereoselective Cycloaddition of Cyclopropanes with Nitrones and Its Application in the Kinetic Resolution of 2-Substituted Cyclopropane-1,1-dicarboxylates (pages 3918–3921)

      Yan-Biao Kang, Xiu-Li Sun and Yong Tang

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604645

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      The multitalented catalyst 1/Ni(ClO4)2 mediates both title processes (see scheme). Together the efficient asymmetric cycloaddition and a kinetic resolution/cycloaddition provide access to both enantiomers of tetrahydro-1,2-oxazines. DME=1,2-dimethoxyethane; R1=aryl, vinyl; R2=Et, Me, benzyl; R3=Me, Ph; R4=aryl, styryl.

    19. A Tungsten–Tin Mixed Hydroxide as an Efficient Heterogeneous Catalyst for Dehydration of Aldoximes to Nitriles (pages 3922–3925)

      Kazuya Yamaguchi, Hiroshi Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki Ogasawara, Miyuki Kotani and Noritaka Mizuno

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605004

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      Mix and match: A tungsten–tin mixed hydroxide (W–Sn hydroxide), prepared by the simple coprecipitation method, acts as a reusable heterogeneous catalyst for the dehydration of various aldoximes to the corresponding nitriles (see scheme, top). Furthermore, the W–Sn hydroxide catalyst could be applied to the direct one-pot synthesis of nitriles from hydroxylamine and the corresponding aldehydes (see scheme, bottom).

    20. Cu2(OTf)2-Catalyzed and Microwave-Controlled Preparation of Tetrazoles from Nitriles and Organic Azides under Mild, Safe Conditions (pages 3926–3930)

      Lluís Bosch and Jaume Vilarrasa

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605095

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      Avoiding hazards: Cu2(OTf)2⋅C6H6 (OTf=O3SCF3) is the catalyst of choice for the [3+2] cycloaddition of organic azides and ethyl cyanoformate or related nitriles (see scheme; PG=protecting group, EWG=electron-withdrawing group). For the first time, tetrazoles are obtained from these substrates at room temperature; heating at 80 °C in CH2Cl2 (microwave reactor) is only required for the most reluctant substrates.

    21. Synthesis of 2,3-Disubstituted Indoles by a Rhodium-Catalyzed Aromatic Amino-Claisen Rearrangement of N-Propargyl Anilines (pages 3931–3933)

      Akio Saito, Ayumi Kanno and Yuji Hanzawa

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605162

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      Give me a ring! A cationic RhI catalyst promotes the formation of fused arenes containing a five-membered ring (see scheme) by an aromatic amino-Claisen rearrangement of N-propargyl aniline derivatives in refluxing hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP). cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene, dppp=1,3-bis(diphenylphosphanyl)propane, Tf=trifluoromethanesulfonyl.

    22. Asymmetric Bioreduction of Activated Alkenes Using Cloned 12-Oxophytodienoate Reductase Isoenzymes OPR-1 and OPR-3 from Lycopersicon esculentum (Tomato): A Striking Change of Stereoselectivity (pages 3934–3937)

      Mélanie Hall, Clemens Stueckler, Wolfgang Kroutil, Peter Macheroux and Kurt Faber

      Version of Record online: 12 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605168

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      Tomato source: 12-Oxophytodienoate reductase isoenzymes OPR1 and OPR3 from tomato possess a broad substrate spectrum for the asymmetric bioreduction of α,β-unsaturated enals, enones, dicarboxylic acids, and N-substituted maleimides (see scheme). Stereocomplementary behavior of both isoenzymes was observed in the reduction of a nitroalkene that led to the formation of opposite stereoisomers in high enantiomeric excess.

    23. Carbonylation of Methanol on Metal–Acid Zeolites: Evidence for a Mechanism Involving a Multisite Active Center (pages 3938–3941)

      Teresa Blasco, Mercedes Boronat, Patricia Concepción, Avelino Corma, David Law and Jose Alejandro Vidal-Moya

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700029

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      IR operando and “in situ” MAS NMR spectroscopic techniques were used to detect the intermediates involved in the carbonylation of methanol on zeolites (mordenite). The presence of Cu as well as Brønsted acid sites enhances the rate of carbonylation over that of the metal-free sample (which produces mainly acetic acid) by preferential adsorption of CO and dimethyl ether on Cu and leads mainly to methyl acetate.

    24. Asymmetric Total Syntheses of Platensimycin (pages 3942–3945)

      K. C. Nicolaou, David J. Edmonds, Ang Li and G. Scott Tria

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700586

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      There are two ways about it: One route to the potent antibiotic (−)-platensimycin used a catalytic asymmetric cycloisomerization and the other an auxiliary-controlled asymmetric alkylation to set the configuration at a key chiral center (see scheme, TMS=trimethylsilyl). This latter synthesis also used an oxidative dearomatization step to construct a key spirocyclic intermediate en route to the natural product.

    25. Ordered Three-Dimensional Arrays of Monodispersed Mn3O4 Nanoparticles with a Core–Shell Structure and Spin-Glass Behavior (pages 3946–3950)

      Feng Jiao, Andrew Harrison and Peter G. Bruce

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700087

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      Don't forget your coat! Monodispersed Mn3O4 nanoparticles, each encased in a thin shell of MnO2, have been prepared for the first time. Ordered three-dimensional arrays of cubic symmetry were formed by self-assembly (see transmission electron microscope image). The nanoparticles exhibit strong interactions between the core and shell, resulting in spin-glass behavior.

    26. Asymmetric Assembly of Aromatic Rings To Produce Tetra-ortho-Substituted Axially Chiral Biaryl Phosphorus Compounds (pages 3951–3954)

      Goushi Nishida, Keiichi Noguchi, Masao Hirano and Ken Tanaka

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700064

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      Densely substituted title compounds can be obtained efficiently through an enantioselective [2+2+2] cycloaddition catalyzed by a cationic RhI/H8-binap complex (see scheme). This method is highly practical in view of the ready access to substrates, mild reaction conditions, operational simplicity, and high catalytic activity. cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene; H8-binap=2,2′-bis(diphenylphosphanyl)-5,5′,6,6′,7,7′,8,8′-octahydro-1,1′-binaphthyl; Ts=p-toluenesulfonyl.

    27. Design of Molecular Logic Devices Based on a Programmable DNA-Regulated Semisynthetic Enzyme (pages 3955–3958)

      Nathan C. Gianneschi and M. Reza Ghadiri

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700047

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      Informed decisions: Logic operations (AND, OR, NOR) can be performed with an enzyme by tagging it and its inhibitor with single-strand DNA. By adding appropriate single-strand DNA, the activity of the enzyme complex can be switched ON and OFF (see picture for NOR logic; DE: DNA-tagged enzyme; DI1, DI2: DNA-tagged inhibitors), or it can be used as a sensitive PCR-independent gene-diagnostic probe.

    28. The Aggregated State of Amyloid-β Peptide In Vitro Depends on Cu2+ Ion Concentration (pages 3959–3961)

      Sangmi Jun and Sunil Saxena

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700318

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      Hold them or fold them: The morphology of aggregated amyloid-β depends on the concentration of Cu2+ ions, as shown in the TEM images. Distinct differences in the coordination of Cu2+ ions to amyloid-β are observed by electron spin resonance as the metal concentration increases. The results suggest a correlation between specific Cu2+ ion coordination and the overall morphology of aggregates.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: The Aggregated State of Amyloid-β Peptide In Vitro Depends on Cu2+ Ion Concentration

      Vol. 46, Issue 28, 5263, Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2007

    29. Total Synthesis of the Marine Natural Product (−)-Cribrostatin 4 (Renieramycin H) (pages 3962–3965)

      Xiaochuan Chen and Jieping Zhu

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700539

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      Winning at dominoes: The cytotoxic title compound was synthesized from five readily available starting materials in a longest linear sequence of 21 steps and 4.3 % overall yield. The key step in the construction of the pentacyclic core of 1 was a domino sequence involving β elimination and an intramolecular phenolic Mannich reaction. Alloc=allyloxycarbonyl, Bn=benzyl, Boc=tert-butoxycarbonyl.

    30. Palladium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Substituted Cycloheptane-1,4-diones by an Asymmetric Ring-Expanding Allylation (AREA) (pages 3966–3970)

      Sabrina R. Schulz and Siegfried Blechert

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604553

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      The right AREA: Functionalized, seven- and eight-membered carbocycles are available from an asymmetric Pd-catalyzed decarboxylative fragmentation of strained bicyclo[3.2.0]heptane-2-ones (see scheme, dba=trans,trans-dibenzylideneacetone). The products were formed in a sequence of [2+2] cycloaddition, retro-aldol reaction, and asymmetric allylation of ketone enolates.

    31. Ring Expansion of a Cp* Moiety: Formation of a 1,2-Diphosphacyclooctatetraene Ligand (pages 3971–3975)

      Manfred Scheer, Daniel Himmel, Brian P. Johnson, Christian Kuntz and Michael Schiffer

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605173

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Not as innocent as it looks: Reaction of the phosphinidene complex 1 with tBuC[TRIPLE BOND]P leads, via a W[TRIPLE BOND]P triply bound intermediate, to the diphosphabutenonyl ligand complex 2, whereas the reaction with MesC[TRIPLE BOND]P (Mes=2,4,6-Me3C6H2) leads, through an unprecedented ring opening of the “innocent” Cp* ligand (Cp*=C5Me5) and insertion of the phosphaalkyne and the phosphinidene P atom, to the novel diphosphacyclooctatetraene ligand complex 3.

    32. The Constrained Amino Acid β-Acc Confers Potency and Selectivity to Integrin Ligands (pages 3976–3978)

      Sylwia Urman, Katharina Gaus, Yi Yang, Ulf Strijowski, Norbert Sewald, Silvia De Pol and Oliver Reiser

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605248

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Complete opposites: The incorporation of the rigid building block (+)-β-Acc (Acc=aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid) into cyclic RGD peptides results in a high affinity towards the integrin αvβ3. The peptides 1 and 2 are composed of the enantiomeric building blocks (+)- (blue) and (−)-β-Acc (red). The active peptide 1 inhibits integrin αvβ3 mediated cell adhesion to vitronectin with an IC50 value of 20 nM.

    33. Synthesis and Structure of a Cationic Platinum Borylene Complex (pages 3979–3982)

      Holger Braunschweig, Krzysztof Radacki and Katharina Uttinger

      Version of Record online: 12 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605191

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Making a B line: The boryl complex trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(Br){B(Mes)Br}] was synthesized and converted into the first two-coordinate borylene complex of platinum, trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(Br)(BMes)]+ (see picture), in which the boron atom is linearly coordinated. The bonding situation was analyzed by theoretical calculations and structural methods. Mes=2,4,6-Me3C6H2.

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