Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 46 Issue 22

May 25, 2007

Volume 46, Issue 22

Pages 3991–4191

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Obituary
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Essay
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: A Supramolecular Approach to Organic Alloys: Cocrystals and Three- and Four-Component Solid Solutions of 1,4-Diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane and 4-X-Phenols (X=Cl, CH3, Br) (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 22/2007) (page 3991)

      Marta Dabros, Paul R. Emery and Venkat R. Thalladi

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200790096

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      Organic alloys …… can be prepared by crystallizing 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) in the presence of up to three different 4-substituted phenols, as described by V. R. Thalladi et al. in their Communication on page 4132 ff. The repeat unit of these solids is a trimolecular assembly: a central DABCO molecule connected to two peripheral phenol molecules (see structure). Substitution of the different phenols with one another leads to ternary and quaternary solid solutions.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Obituary
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Essay
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols at Room Temperature and Atmospheric Conditions Catalyzed by Reusable Gold Nanoclusters Stabilized by the Benzene Rings of Polystyrene Derivatives (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 22/2007) (page 3992)

      Hiroyuki Miyamura, Ryosuke Matsubara, Yoji Miyazaki and Shū Kobayashi

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200790097

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      Polymer-incarcerated gold nanoclusters catalyze the aerobic oxidation of various alcohols to aldehydes and ketones under ambient conditions. As described by S. Kobayashi and co-workers in their Communication on page 4151 ff., the nanoclusters were prepared by microencapsulation of gold in a copolymer based on polystyrene followed by cross-linking. The oxidation reactions catalyzed by the nanoclusters proceed without heating, with only molecular oxygen consumed and water generated as the sole side product.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Obituary
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Essay
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 22/2007 (pages 3995–4006)

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200790098

  4. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Obituary
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Essay
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
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      High Turnover Numbers for the Catalytic Selective Epoxidation of Alkenes with 1 atm of Molecular Oxygen (page 4006)

      Yoshiyuki Nishiyama, Yoshinao Nakagawa and Noritaka Mizuno

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200790099

      This article corrects:

      High Turnover Numbers for the Catalytic Selective Epoxidation of Alkenes with 1 atm of Molecular Oxygen1

      Vol. 40, Issue 19, 3639–3641, Article first published online: 2 OCT 2001

  5. News

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    5. Corrigendum
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    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Essay
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
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  6. Obituary

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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
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    1. Paul C. Lauterbur (1929–2007) (page 4010)

      Hans Wolfgang Spiess

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200701624

  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Obituary
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Essay
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
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  8. Highlight

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Obituary
    8. Book Review
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    10. Essay
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    1. A New Oxocarbon C12O6 via Highly Strained Benzyne Intermediates (pages 4012–4014)

      Holger Butenschön

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700926

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      Some fine arynes: Elimination of triflate followed by [2+2] cycloaddition with ketene silyl acetals facilitates the formation of highly strained benzynes with one or two annulated cyclobutane rings. A prominent example based on this chemistry is the synthesis of the novel oxocarbon C12O6 (see structure).

  9. Essay

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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
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    1. Tracing the Origins and Evolution of Chirality and Handedness in Chemical Language (pages 4016–4024)

      Pedro Cintas

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603714

      Chirality, the key concept first proposed by Kelvin, was reintroduced in textbooks in the mid-1960s. Since then, it has been the source of much reflection and inspiration. This Essay traces the nonchemical origins of the concept and its semantic connotations, which not only enrich the language of chemistry but also have ramifications in, for example, philosophy.

  10. Minireview

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
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    8. Book Review
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    10. Essay
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    1. Chemical Approaches to Molecular Logic Elements for Addition and Subtraction (pages 4026–4040)

      Uwe Pischel

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603990

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      Go figure! Molecules that can add or subtract binary digits are an interesting aspect of the concept of molecular logic. In contrast to silicon-based microprocessors, these molecular devices receive chemical or optical input signals. The picture shows an abacus, one of the oldest devices for calculation, and fluorescein, a universal model of a molecular calculator, interlinked by the truth table of a half adder.

  11. Review

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
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    7. Obituary
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    1. Electrophilic Activation of Alkenes by Platinum(II): So Much More Than a Slow Version of Palladium(II) (pages 4042–4059)

      Anthony R. Chianese, Stephen J. Lee and Michel R. Gagné

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603954

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      Going platinum: Many metal ions are known for their ability to activate olefins toward nucleophilic attack and platinum(II) complexes are no exception. The wide range of platinum-catalyzed reactions, often complementary to palladium catalysis, includes simple addition to alkenes (hydroamination, hydroarylation, hydroalkylation) and more complex cycloisomerization reactions.

  12. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Obituary
    8. Book Review
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    1. Supportless Pt and PtPd Nanotubes as Electrocatalysts for Oxygen-Reduction Reactions (pages 4060–4063)

      Zhongwei Chen, Mahesh Waje, Wenzhen Li and Yushan Yan

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700894

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      Staying power: A new class of cathode catalysts based on supportless Pt (see picture, left) and PtPd nanotubes (NTs) is introduced. These materials have remarkable durability (right; CV=cyclic voltammetry, ECSA=electrochemical surface area) and high catalytic activity. They have the potential to circumvent most of the degradation pathways of current Pt/C and Pt-black catalysts.

    2. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Hyperpolarized Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pages 4064–4068)

      Louis-S. Bouchard, Kirill V. Kovtunov, Scott R. Burt, M. Sabieh Anwar, Igor V. Koptyug, Renad Z. Sagdeev and Alexander Pines

      Article first published online: 23 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700830

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      Gas-phase MRI phantom: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the gas phase was demonstrated using para-hydrogen-induced polarization. H2 enriched in the para (antiparallel) spin state and propylene gas were flowed over solid-supported Wilkinson's catalyst, and the product, propane gas, was collected in an NMR tube. Enhanced signal intensities were observed in the images of phantoms placed inside the NMR tube (see picture).

    3. Stereoselective Simmons–Smith Cyclopropanation of Chiral Enamides (pages 4069–4072)

      Zhenlei Song, Ting Lu, Richard P. Hsung, Ziyad F. Al-Rashid, Changhong Ko and Yu Tang

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700681

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      Efficient and practical access to chiral aminocyclopropanes is secured by the title reaction (see example). Both E and Z enamides undergo the cyclopropanation with high diastereoselectivity (d.r. up to >95:5). The application of this methodology to the synthesis of biologically significant aminocyclopropanes illustrates the potential of chiral enamides as useful building blocks for stereoselective organic synthesis.

    4. A Hexacopper Fluoro Metallacrown Cavitand and its Alkali-Metal Complexes (pages 4073–4076)

      Leigh F. Jones, Colin A. Kilner, Marcelo P. de Miranda, Joanna Wolowska and Malcolm A. Halcrow

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700584

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      A brimming bowl: The [12]MC-6 fluoro metallacrown (MC) shown in the picture is crystallized both as a metal-free wheel and in complex with Na+ or K+ ions. The magnetic and structural properties are only slightly altered upon metal complexation. Opposite faces of the molecule form bowl-shaped cavities, in which H2O or CH2Cl2 molecules are hydrogen-bonded to the F acceptors.

    5. Synthesis of the Carbocyclic Core of Zoanthenol: Implementation of an Unusual Acid-Catalyzed Cyclization (pages 4077–4080)

      Douglas C. Behenna, Jennifer L. Stockdill and Brian M. Stoltz

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700430

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      A smokin' hot cyclization! When the racemic cyclization precursor is heated in neat trifluoroacetic acid, an unusual Friedel–Crafts-type cyclization forms the carbocyclic core of the marine alkaloid zoanthenol containing two all-carbon-substituted quaternary centers. Catalytic asymmetric alkylation allows entry into an enantioselective route.

    6. Development and Biological Assessment of Fully Water-Soluble Helical Aromatic Amide Foldamers (pages 4081–4084)

      Elizabeth R. Gillies, Frédérique Deiss, Cathy Staedel, Jean-Marie Schmitter and Ivan Huc

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700301

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      Abiotic but bioactive: Folding aromatic amide oligomers possessing helical structures very different from those of α-peptides, β-peptides, or peptoids nevertheless show comparable abilities to penetrate into cells, as well as low toxicity and complete resistance to protease degradation. TFA=trifluoroacetate.

    7. Singlet Diradical Character of an Oxidized Ruthenium Trithiolate: Electronic Structure and Reactivity (pages 4085–4088)

      Craig A. Grapperhaus, Pawel M. Kozlowski, Devesh Kumar, Holly N. Frye, Kiran B. Venna and Selma Poturovic

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700297

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      All alone: The ground state of the oxidized, reactive intermediate [Ru(dppbt)3]+ (dppbt=2-diphenylphosphinothiaphenolate) is calculated to be a singlet diradical. The unpaired electrons in the π* orbitals are delocalized over the metal atom and the ligand sulfur atoms. The relative orientation of the half-occupied orbitals inhibits disulfide formation and favors addition of unsaturated hydrocarbons across adjacent sulfur atoms.

    8. A Supramolecular Multiposition Rotary Device (pages 4089–4092)

      Nikolai Wintjes, Davide Bonifazi, Fuyong Cheng, Andreas Kiebele, Meike Stöhr, Thomas Jung, Hannes Spillmann and François Diederich

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700285

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      Spinning tops: A supramolecular rotary device, reminiscent of a mechanical rotary switch, was engineered by a bottom-up approach. Self-assembly of a functionalized porphyrin molecule leads to the formation of a porous network that features chiral cavities. These serve as hosts for molecular guests, which can be induced to rotate either thermally or by using the scanning tunneling microscopy tip (see images).

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      Colorimetric Detection of Mercuric Ion (Hg2+) in Aqueous Media using DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles (pages 4093–4096)

      Jae-Seung Lee, Min Su Han and Chad A. Mirkin

      Article first published online: 27 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700269

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      Color is everything: Hg2+ in aqueous media is detected by the formation of thymidine–Hg2+–thymidine coordination complexes, which raises the melting temperature of the DNA-hybridized gold nanoparticle probes and thus the temperature at which the probes disperse and effect a purple-to-red color change. The method has very high sensitivity and selectivity, and it provides a simple and fast colorimetric readout (see picture).

    10. A Protein-Responsive Chromophore Based on Squaraine and Its Application to Visual Protein Detection on a Gel for SDS-PAGE (pages 4097–4099)

      Yoshio Suzuki and Kenji Yokoyama

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700245

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      Dying to know: A visual protein indicator based on squaraine is responsible for a profound color change upon binding to protein in solution, from light pink for the dye alone to deep purple for the dye⋅BSA complex (see picture; BSA: bovine serum albumin). The detection limit for BSA is 2 μg mL−1, which is about five times higher than that with Coomassie Brilliant Blue as the dye.

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      “Intelligent” Fingerprinting: Simultaneous Identification of Drug Metabolites and Individuals by Using Antibody-Functionalized Nanoparticles (pages 4100–4103)

      Richard Leggett, Emma E. Lee-Smith, Sue M. Jickells and David A. Russell

      Article first published online: 27 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700217

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      Thumbs up: A method of fingerprinting that enables both identification of an individual and simultaneous determination of the chemical makeup of the sweat deposited in the fingerprint has been determined. Potential applications of this methodology are enormous as the functionalization of nanoparticles with other antibodies enables the specific detection of numerous antigens within a fingerprint.

    12. Molecular Printboards as a General Platform for Protein Immobilization: A Supramolecular Solution to Nonspecific Adsorption (pages 4104–4107)

      Manon J. W. Ludden, Alart Mulder, Robert Tampé, David N. Reinhoudt and Jurriaan Huskens

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605104

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      Be specific: A supramolecular adsorbate consisting of an adamantyl group (red) and an oligo(ethylene glycol) chain has been designed to prevent nonspecific protein adsorption at cyclodextrin molecular printboards. The adamantyl group allows specific and reversible interactions. Specific immobilization of proteins (gray) is possible through multivalent orthogonal linkers by effective replacement of the monovalent adsorbate (Ni2+ ions (green) may be needed; see picture).

    13. A Versatile Method for Direct and Covalent Immobilization of DNA and Proteins on Biochips (pages 4108–4110)

      Benjamin P. Corgier, Alain Laurent, Pascal Perriat, Loïc J. Blum and Christophe A. Marquette

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605010

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      Stuck on sensing: A method is presented for the immobilization of aryl diazonium modified biomolecules by direct electrografting onto the surface of a conducting material to create effective on-chip sensing layers (see picture). Proof of concept is given for both proteins (antibodies, enzymes) and DNA.

    14. Discovering and Verifying Elusive Fullerene Cage Isomers: Structures of C2p11-(C74-D3h)(CF3)12 and C2p11‒(C78D3h(5))(CF3)12 (pages 4111–4114)

      Natalia B. Shustova, Brian S. Newell, Susie M. Miller, Oren P. Anderson, Robert D. Bolskar, Konrad Seppelt, Alexey A. Popov, Olga V. Boltalina and Steven H. Strauss

      Article first published online: 23 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604968

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      Two in a million: The solid-state structures of C2-symmetric isomers of C74(CF3)12 (see picture) and C78(CF3)12 have been solved by X-ray crystallography. They verify the structures of the hollow C74-D3h and C78-D3h(5) cages, and exhibit a (para)11 ribbon of edge-sharing p-C6(CF3)2 hexagons on the surface of the fullerenes.

    15. Molecular Basis for Trehalase Inhibition Revealed by the Structure of Trehalase in Complex with Potent Inhibitors (pages 4115–4119)

      Robert P. Gibson, Tracey M. Gloster, Shirley Roberts, R. Anthony J. Warren, Isabel Storch de Gracia, Ángela García, Jose L. Chiara and Gideon J. Davies

      Article first published online: 23 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604825

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      Strong inhibitions: The inhibition of trehalases, enzymes which hydrolyze the disaccharide trehalose, is a target for novel antibiotic insecticides. The structures (see picture; C black, N blue, O red, S yellow) of a trehalase in complex with validoxylamine A (yellow) and 1-thiatetrazolin (blue) reveal that the inhibitors tightly bind to the enzyme through hydrogen bonds.

    16. Efficient Fluorescence Enhancement and Cooperative Binding of an Organic Dye in a Supra-biomolecular Host–Protein Assembly (pages 4120–4122)

      Achikanath C. Bhasikuttan, Jyotirmayee Mohanty, Werner M. Nau and Haridas Pal

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604757

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      A factor of 300 enhancement in fluorescence and increased binding is observed when the triphenylmethane dye Brilliant Green binds to bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the presence of the macrocyclic host cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) as a supramolecular “enhancer” (see picture). Thus, a cumulative (multiplicative) fluorescence enhancement occurs compared to the effects observed in the presence of CB7 alone (factor of 6) or BSA alone (factor of 45).

    17. Extremely Stable Photoinduced Charge Separation in a Colloidal System Composed of Semiconducting Niobate and Clay Nanosheets (pages 4123–4127)

      Nobuyoshi Miyamoto, Yoshimi Yamada, Satoshi Koizumi and Teruyuki Nakato

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604483

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      The further, the better! Photoinduced charge separation between a semiconducting nanosheet donor and the acceptor methylviologen (MV2+) is greatly stabilized in the presence of hectorite clay nanosheets. The distance between the donor and acceptor, which results from the formation of hectorite microdomains that selectively adsorb MV2+ ions, is key for this stabilization (see picture).

    18. Honeycomb-Patterned Photoluminescent Films Fabricated by Self-Assembly of Hyperbranched Polymers (pages 4128–4131)

      Cuihua Liu, Chao Gao and Deyue Yan

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604429

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      A film to dye for: Honeycomb-patterned films have been fabricated by the self-assembly of amphiphilic hyperbranched poly(amidoamine) on solid substrates. The film thickness can be varied from the nanometer to micrometer scale simply by changing the concentration of the polymer solution. Luminescent films of different colors can be prepared by encapsulating various dyes into the polymer (see picture, R=(CH2)14CH3, red sphere=dye molecule).

    19. A Supramolecular Approach to Organic Alloys: Cocrystals and Three- and Four-Component Solid Solutions of 1,4-Diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane and 4-X-Phenols (X=Cl, CH3, Br) (pages 4132–4135)

      Marta Dabros, Paul R. Emery and Venkat R. Thalladi

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604830

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      Triple play: The crystallization of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (A) with one, two, or three different 4-substituted phenols (B, C, D) leads to cocrystals (for example, AB2, left) or solid solutions (for example, A(B,C,D)2, right). The repeat units of these multicomponent organic solids are supramolecular assemblies of three molecules.

    20. [4+1]/[2+1] Cycloaddition Reactions of Fischer Carbene Complexes with α,β-Unsaturated Ketones and Aldehydes (pages 4136–4140)

      José Barluenga, Hugo Fanlo, Salomé López and Josefa Flórez

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605167

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      Put two and two together: Fischer carbene complexes and α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds smoothly react under thermal conditions to give 2,3-dihydrofurans, and from them furans or 1,4-dicarbonyl compounds were easily accessible (see scheme). This cycloaddition process involves a cyclopropanation reaction followed by rearrangement from the acylcyclopropane to a dihydrofuran.

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      Stereoselective Synthesis of Ferrocene-Based C2-Symmetric Diphosphine Ligands: Application to the Highly Enantioselective Hydrogenation of α-Substituted Cinnamic Acids (pages 4141–4144)

      Weiping Chen, Peter J. McCormack, Karim Mohammed, William Mbafor, Stanley M. Roberts and John Whittall

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604493

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      Chirality3: A new ferrocene-based diphosphine ligand is applied to the asymmetric hydrogenation of α-substituted cinnamic acids. The P-centered-, C-centered-, and planar-chiral ligand (RC,RC,SFc,SFc,SP,SP)-1 displays unprecedented enantioselectivity in this Rh-catalyzed reaction (see scheme; cod=cycloocta-1,5-diene).

    22. Direct Electrochemical Characterization of Archaeal Thioredoxins (pages 4145–4147)

      Sarah E. Chobot, Hector H. Hernandez, Catherine L. Drennan and Sean J. Elliott

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604620

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      Send and deliver: The thioredoxin (Trx) superfamily of proteins contains small soluble proteins that function as 2 e/2 H+ electron-transfer agents by virtue of a redox-active disulfide bond. A fully reversible 2 e disulfide-bond redox couple can be observed for four different Trx proteins.

    23. A Sesquineolignan with a Spirodienone Structure from Pinus sylvestris L. (pages 4148–4150)

      Jari Sinkkonen, Jaana Liimatainen, Maarit Karonen, Kirsti Wiinamäki, Patrik Eklund, Rainer Sjöholm and Kalevi Pihlaja

      Article first published online: 23 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605115

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      Barking up the right tree: The spirodienone sesquineolignan pinobatol (1), a long-time speculated monomeric unit of lignin, was isolated from the 70 % aqueous acetone extract of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) bark. Its structure was determined by high-resolution electron ionization mass spectrometry and a variety of NMR spectroscopic techniques.

    24. Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols at Room Temperature and Atmospheric Conditions Catalyzed by Reusable Gold Nanoclusters Stabilized by the Benzene Rings of Polystyrene Derivatives (pages 4151–4154)

      Hiroyuki Miyamura, Ryosuke Matsubara, Yoji Miyazaki and Shū Kobayashi

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700080

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      Lock up your gold: Polymer-incarcerated gold nanoclusters (PI Au) were synthesized by microencapsulation of gold nanoclusters and cross-linking using a copolymer based on polystyrene (see TEM image). The nanoclusters could be used to catalyze the aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones under atmospheric conditions at room temperature, and additionally could be reused with little loss of activity.

    25. Synthesis and Characterization of Monodisperse Hollow Fe3O4 Nanoparticles (pages 4155–4158)

      Sheng Peng and Shouheng Sun

      Article first published online: 27 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700677

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      Controlled oxidation of amorphous core–shell Fe–Fe3O4 nanoparticles in a simple solution-phase process affords monodisperse hollow Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Self-assembly of the monodisperse hollow Fe3O4 nanoparticles leads to superlattice arrays (see TEM image). The synthesis offers a general approach to hollow iron oxide and core–shell–void Fe–Fe3O4 nanoparticles that may have potential applications in catalysis and high-frequency electromagnetic devices.

    26. From a Stable Silylene to a Mixed-Valent Disiloxane and an Isolable Silaformamide–Borane Complex with Considerable Silicon–Oxygen Double-Bond Character (pages 4159–4162)

      Shenglai Yao, Markus Brym, Christoph van Wüllen and Matthias Driess

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700398

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      Kipping's dream has (almost) become reality with the first isolable silanone-like complex 2, prepared by borane-assisted addition of water to the stable silylene 1. The short Si–O bond in 2 points to considerable Si[DOUBLE BOND]O character. In contrast, treatment of 1 with water in the absence of a borane leads to the crystalline siloxy silylene 3, an unprecedented mixed-valent disiloxane with di- and tetravalent silicon atoms (R=2,6-iPr2C6H3).

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      Rewritable Imaging on the Surface of Frozen Ionic Liquids (pages 4163–4165)

      Frank J. M. Rutten, Haregewine Tadesse and Peter Licence

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700144

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      The write way: A technique for high-resolution rewritable image formation has been derived by using frozen ionic liquids as a temperature-controllable canvas that allows the simple erasure of data. This technique is very flexible as the physicochemical properties of ionic liquids can be fine-tuned through manipulation of the chemical/structural composition of the individual ions.

    28. Formation of Potentially Prebiotic Amphiphiles by Reaction of β-Hydroxy-n-alkylamines with Cyclotriphosphate (pages 4166–4168)

      Lee B. Mullen and John D. Sutherland

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700394

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The long and the short of it: In water, long-chain β-hydroxy-n-alkylamines are converted to their O-monophosphates by reaction with cyclotriphosphate. With short-chain β-hydroxy-n-alkylamines, N-triphosphates are formed instead. The difference results from the formation of surfactant assemblies from the long-chain compounds. This surfactant control of reactivity may be of relevance to the prebiotic formation of amphiphiles. (P): phosphate unit.

    29. Photochemical and Radiolytic Production of an Organic Hydride Donor with a RuII Complex Containing an NAD+ Model Ligand (pages 4169–4172)

      Dmitry Polyansky, Diane Cabelli, James T. Muckerman, Etsuko Fujita, Take-aki Koizumi, Takashi Fukushima, Tohru Wada and Koji Tanaka

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700304

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Role model: The photochemical and electrochemical properties of a polypyridylruthenium complex with an NAD+/NADH (NAD+=nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) model ligand, [Ru(bpy)2(pbn)]2+ ([1]2+; bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, pbn=2-(2-pyridyl)benzo[b]-1,5-naphthyridine), were investigated. When solutions containing [1]2+ and triethylamine are irradiated with visible light, [(1)HH]2+ is produced cleanly (see scheme).

    30. Synthesis of Pentaantennary N-Glycans with Bisecting GlcNAc and Core Fucose (pages 4173–4175)

      Steffen Eller, Ralf Schuberth, Gislinde Gundel, Joachim Seifert and Carlo Unverzagt

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604788

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Always use protection? The omission of a single protecting group led to the convergent synthesis of the highly branched dodecasaccharide N-glycan that contains two neighboring tetrasubstituted mannoside groups. A serendipitous finding led to the identification of the key protecting group in oligosaccharide building blocks for the optimized synthesis of N-glycans.

    31. Carbanions with Two N Substituents: Nucleophilic Acyl-Group-Transfer Reagents (pages 4176–4179)

      Daniel Bojer, Ina Kamps, Xin Tian, Alexander Hepp, Tania Pape, Roland Fröhlich and Norbert W. Mitzel

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200700113

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Without mercury or thallium: A new umpoled nucleophilic acylation reagent is formed in the direct deprotonation of 1,3,5-trimethyl-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane with butyllithium. The carbanionic center is flanked by two amino groups, even though lithiation at this position is expected to be disfavored (see scheme).

    32. Generation of Live-Cell Microarrays by Means of DNA-Directed Immobilization of Specific Cell-Surface Ligands (pages 4180–4183)

      Hendrik Schroeder, Bernhard Ellinger, Christian F. W. Becker, Herbert Waldmann and Christof M. Niemeyer

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604467

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Everything in its place: The DNA-directed immobilization of specific cell-surface ligands on a DNA microarray enables the generation of positionally encoded arrays of live cells. Such arrays can be used for fundamental research in molecular cell biology or as a screening platform in the area of drug development

    33. DNA Photography: An Ultrasensitive DNA-Detection Method Based on Photographic Techniques (pages 4184–4187)

      David M. Hammond, Antonio Manetto, Johannes Gierlich, Vladimir A. Azov, Philipp M. E. Gramlich, Glenn A. Burley, Melanie Maul and Thomas Carell

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200605023

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      All there in black and white: DNA labeled with spectral sensitizers applied to commercially available photopaper allows the detection of oligonucleotides with extreme sensitivity. The detection of the DNA with the help of black and white photography is shown in the picture (ODN=oligodeoxyribonucleotide).

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      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 23/2007 (page 4191)

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200790101

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