Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 47 Issue 14

March 25, 2008

Volume 47, Issue 14

Pages 2515–2707

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Reviews
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Direct Evidence for a Hydrogen Bond to Bound Dioxygen in a Myoglobin/Hemoglobin Model System and in Cobalt Myoglobin by Pulse-EPR Spectroscopy (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 14/2008) (page 2515)

      Henry Dube, Besnik Kasumaj, Carlos Calle, Makoto Saito, Gunnar Jeschke and François Diederich

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890057

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A direct look at hydrogen bonding is possible with a synthetic cobalt(II) porphyrin model complex for myoglobin and hemoglobin. A dipolar distal hydrogen bond to bound dioxygen has been directly identified and characterized by pulse Davies-ENDOR spectroscopy. The complete EPR parameters for this interaction are given by F. Diederich et al. in their Communication on page 2600 ff. A similar but stronger distal hydrogen bond was revealed by the same methods in the dioxygen adduct of natural cobalt myoglobin, thus demonstrating that the synthetic complex is an excellent model for the natural protein.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Reviews
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Direct Light-Driven Modulation of Luminescence from Mn-Doped ZnSe Quantum Dots (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 14/2008) (page 2516)

      Scott E. Irvine, Thorsten Staudt, Eva Rittweger, Johann Engelhardt and Stefan W. Hell

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890058

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      Light-driven control of the fluorescence from Mn-doped ZnSe quantum dots is described by S. Hell and co-workers in their Communication on page 2685 ff. Blue light is used to excite the quantum nanocrystals, while a second longer wavelength modulated beam (red) can be used to selectively gate the fluorescence from the quantum dots. The lower right inset illustrates the energy levels involved in the light-controlled fluorescence from Mn-doped quantum dots.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Reviews
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Reviews
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  5. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Reviews
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
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    1. Chemistry in the Garden. By James R. Hanson. (page 2535)

      Charles Sell

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200785564

  6. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Reviews
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
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    10. Communications
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    1. Coordination Copolymerization of Polar Vinyl Monomers H2C[DOUBLE BOND]CHX (pages 2538–2542)

      Andreas Berkefeld and Stefan Mecking

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704642

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      Rising to the challenge: Neutral phosphinosulfonate PdII complexes were recently demonstrated to be versatile catalysts even for the challenging insertion copolymerization of polar functionalized vinyl comonomers H2C[DOUBLE BOND]CHX, such as acrylonitrile, vinyl acetate, and alkyl vinyl ethers (see scheme, MA=methyl acrylate).

    2. The Porphyrin Twist: Hückel and Möbius Aromaticity (pages 2543–2546)

      Norbert Jux

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705568

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      An interesting twist: Expanded porphyrins possess Möbius-strip-like structures in the solid state and in solution. The high conformational flexibility of individual groups enables a temperature- and solvent-dependent switch between Hückel and Möbius aromaticity. Group 10 metals can serve as clamps to stabilize the twist of the Möbius structure (see picture).

  7. Minireview

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Reviews
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
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    1. Synthesis of Platensimycin (pages 2548–2555)

      Konrad Tiefenbacher and Johann Mulzer

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705303

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      Route finders: The discovery of platensimycin (1) in 2006 has been hailed as a true breakthrough in antibiotic research. By efficiently blocking bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis it has a unique mode of action and therefore shows no cross-resistance to existing drugs. In this Minireview all the synthetic efforts towards 1 and its analogous are discussed.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Reviews
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
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    1. Combinatorial Transition-Metal Catalysis: Mixing Monodentate Ligands to Control Enantio-, Diastereo-, and Regioselectivity (pages 2556–2588)

      Manfred T. Reetz

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704327

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      Mix well: A novel concept in combinatorial homogeneous transition-metal catalysis lies in the mixing of two monodentate ligands in the presence of a transition metal to provide two homocombinations and one heterocombination. If the latter is most active, it will define the catalytic profile. By using this strategy, a better catalyst can be obtained without the need for preparing new ligands.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Reviews
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Rapid and Efficient Identification of Bacteria Using Gold-Nanoparticle–Poly(para-phenyleneethynylene) Constructs (pages 2590–2594)

      Ronnie L. Phillips, Oscar R. Miranda, Chang-Cheng You, Vincent M. Rotello and Uwe H. F. Bunz

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200703369

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      Microbiological intelligence: Simple constructs of hydrophobically functionalized gold nanoarticles and a conjugated polymer (poly(para-phenyleneethynylene, PPE) are able to identify three different strains of E. coli in minutes. The negatively charged bacteria replace the negatively charged conjugated polymers from the positively charged gold nanoparticles (see scheme), differentially restoring the polymer fluorescence.

    2. Improving Oral Bioavailability of Peptides by Multiple N-Methylation: Somatostatin Analogues (pages 2595–2599)

      Eric Biron, Jayanta Chatterjee, Oded Ovadia, Daniel Langenegger, Joseph Brueggen, Daniel Hoyer, Herbert A. Schmid, Raz Jelinek, Chaim Gilon, Amnon Hoffman and Horst Kessler

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705797

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      Full methyl jacket? A complete library of the N-methylated somatostatin cyclopeptidic analogue Veber–Hirschmann peptide cyclo(-PFwKTF-) has been prepared with the aim of improving its bioavailability. Several analogues from the library were found to bind to the somatostatin receptor in the nanomolar range and one of them shows a significant oral bioavailability of 10 %. Conformational analysis shows that N-methylation is allowed at specific positions without affecting the bioactive conformation.

    3. Direct Evidence for a Hydrogen Bond to Bound Dioxygen in a Myoglobin/Hemoglobin Model System and in Cobalt Myoglobin by Pulse-EPR Spectroscopy (pages 2600–2603)

      Henry Dube, Besnik Kasumaj, Carlos Calle, Makoto Saito, Gunnar Jeschke and François Diederich

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705180

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      Hydrogen bond revealed: In a cobalt(II) porphyrin complex which serves as a model for the dioxygen binding site of myoglobin (Mb) and hemoglobin, a distal hydrogen bond to the bound O2 was identified and characterized by pulse ENDOR spectroscopy. A similar but stronger hydrogen bond was revealed with the same methods in natural Co-Mb-O2.

    4. Improved Aptazyme Design and In Vivo Screening Enable Riboswitching in Bacteria (pages 2604–2607)

      Markus Wieland and Jörg S. Hartig

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200703700

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      Switch-hitter: A new strategy to control gene expression relies on a ligand-dependent, ribozyme-based RNA switch. The key feature of this setup is that the ribozyme liberates the ribosome binding site upon cleavage of the message. The design made it possible to screen in vivo for an inducible aptazyme by attaching an aptamer to stem III of the ribozyme, thus preserving naturally occurring stem I/stem II contacts.

    5. Phosphorus NMR Spectroscopy as a Versatile Tool for Compound Library Screening (pages 2608–2611)

      Florian Manzenrieder, Andreas O. Frank and Horst Kessler

      Version of Record online: 29 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705256

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      A new librarian: The applicability of NMR spectroscopy in biological and pharmaceutical research has been extended by introducing phosphorus (31P) as a new nucleus for compound library screening of protein inhibitors. Several NMR-based methods, such as recovery experiments and two-dimensional measurements, were utilized to show the fundamental soundness of the newly developed ligand-based screening approach.

    6. Perylene Bisimide Dimers as Fluorescent “Glue” for DNA and for Base-Mismatch Detection (pages 2612–2614)

      Daniela Baumstark and Hans-Achim Wagenknecht

      Version of Record online: 20 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705237

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      Lights up! The characteristic fluorescence of perylene bisimide dimers can be used to study DNA hybridization and DNA aggregation (see scheme) as well as the presence of single-base-pair mismatches and deletions.

    7. Alternating Copolymerizations Using a Grubbs-Type Initiator with an Unsymmetrical, Chiral N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand (pages 2615–2618)

      Kati Vehlow, Dongren Wang, Michael R. Buchmeiser and Siegfried Blechert

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704822

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      Good for a ROMP: Initiators 1 and 2, which both contain an unsymmetric, chiral N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand, mediate the alternating copolymerization of norborn-2-ene with other cyclic olefins including cyclopentene and cyclooctene. The selectivity of the copolymerization is explained by the steric interaction of the growing polymer chain with the 1-phenylethyl substituent and the nitrogen atom of the NHC ligand.

    8. Catalytic Dehydrogenation of Isopentane with Iridium Catalysts (pages 2619–2621)

      Helmut G. Alt and Ingrid K. Böhmer

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704856

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      Activation by adding PPh3: The catalytic dehydrogenation of isopentane to give isopentene and hydrogen with iridium catalysts on a silica gel support at 450 °C proceeds with impressive conversion when the support is impregnated with PPh3. The active species are proposed to be iridium phosphides which arise by thermal cleavage of phenyl groups.

    9. Five-Membered Metallacyclic Allenoids: Synthesis and Structure of Remarkably Stable Strongly Distorted Cyclic Allene Derivatives (pages 2622–2625)

      Juri Ugolotti, Gereon Dierker, Gerald Kehr, Roland Fröhlich, Stefan Grimme and Gerhard Erker

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705615

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      Metallocene lends a hand: Treatment of [bis(alkynyl)HfCp2] complexes with HB(C6F5)2 results in 1,1-hydroboration and subsequent carbon–carbon coupling to yield the corresponding metallacyclopenta-1,2-diene derivatives (see structure of the trimethylsilyl derivative; Hf brown, B red, Si blue, F green, C black). X-ray diffraction and a quantum chemical analysis reveal an electronic structure between a bent cyclic allene and a coordinated butenyne.

    10. Unprecedented Replacement of Bridging Oxygen Atoms in Polyoxometalates with Organic Imido Ligands (pages 2626–2630)

      Jian Hao, Yun Xia, Longsheng Wang, Laurent Ruhlmann, Yulin Zhu, Qiang Li, Panchao Yin, Yongge Wei and Hongyou Guo

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704546

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      Building bridges: Two arylimido derivatives of hexamolybdate, containing unprecedented bridging imido ligands, have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Their 1H NMR and UV/Vis spectra distinguish them from related terminally coordinated derivatives. Such compounds extend the range of organoimido polyoxometalate coordination chemistry, providing insight into the mechanism of oxo metathesis in the Lindqvist polymolybdate.

    11. Electrically Addressable Cell Immobilization Using Phenylboronic Acid Diazonium Salts (pages 2631–2634)

      Ronen Polsky, Jason C. Harper, David R. Wheeler, Dulce C. Arango and Susan M. Brozik

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704597

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      Holding cells: Individual gold electrodes can be activated by phenylboronic acid diazonium salts for the facile and reversible immobilization of eukaryotic cells (see scheme). This platform provides a simple method for on-demand release of captured cells (yeast and macrophage) and can be used in single-cell or array-based studies.

    12. Toward a Computational Tool Predicting the Stereochemical Outcome of Asymmetric Reactions: Development and Application of a Rapid and Accurate Program Based on Organic Principles (pages 2635–2638)

      Christopher R. Corbeil, Sabine Thielges, Jeremy A. Schwartzentruber and Nicolas Moitessier

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704774

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      Finding an ACE in the deck: The newly developed program ACE 1.0 (ACE= asymmetric catalyst evaluation) rapidly and accurately predicts the stereochemical outcome of asymmetric reactions. Application of ACE to asymmetric Diels–Alder cycloadditions and organocatalyzed aldol reactions demonstrates high accuracy (see picture; R=iPr (2 a), Me (2 b), Ph (2 c)).

    13. Rapid Determination of Both the Activity and Enantioselectivity of Ketoreductases (pages 2639–2641)

      Matthew D. Truppo, Franck Escalettes and Nicholas J. Turner

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705046

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      Fast and furious: A rapid and inexpensive assay for determining both the activity and enantioselectivity of ketoreductases (KREDs) has been developed (see scheme; HRP=horseradish peroxidase, ABTS=2,2′-azino-di(3-ethyl benzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid). This assay, which employs an enantioselective alcohol oxidase as a reporter enzyme, was used to screen a panel of 17 KREDs in only 10 min using less than 0.5 mg substrate.

    14. Isoprene Polymerization with Yttrium Amidinate Catalysts: Switching the Regio- and Stereoselectivity by Addition of AlMe3 (pages 2642–2645)

      Lixin Zhang, Masayoshi Nishiura, Masahiro Yuki, Yi Luo and Zhaomin Hou

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705120

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      Aluminum switches: The addition of AlMe3 to the isoprene polymerization catalyst 1/[Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] switches the regio- and stereoselectivity from 3,4-isospecific to 1,4-cis selective (see scheme). A heterotrinuclear Y/Al complex obtained from the reaction of 1 with AlMe3 shows 1,4-cis selectivity under similar conditions in the presence of [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4]. PI=polyisoprene.

    15. MALDI In-Source Photooxidation Reactions for Online Peptide Tagging (pages 2646–2648)

      Liang Qiao, Christophe Roussel, Jingjing Wan, Jilie Kong, Pengyuan Yang, Hubert H. Girault and Baohong Liu

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200703876

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      A TiO2photoelectrode array has been designed to achieve efficient photoelectrochemical redox reactions with electron donors or acceptors during the laser desorption ionization process. By adding hydroquinone to a peptide mixture, the photoelectrochemically generated benzoquinone reacts with the cysteine residues to selectively form tagged cysteine-containing peptides, thus demonstrating that in-source oxidation reactions can be efficiently performed.

    16. Pure C[BOND]H Hydrogen Bonding to Chloride Ions: A Preorganized and Rigid Macrocyclic Receptor (pages 2649–2652)

      Yongjun Li and Amar H. Flood

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704717

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      Strength in numbers: When traditionally weak C[BOND]H hydrogen bonds are preorganized in a shape-persistent macrocycle, a strong affinity for chloride ions emerges. This discovery arises from the dual use of click chemistry for efficient macrocyclization and the favorable steric properties of the resulting 1,2,3-triazoles.

    17. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Using Nafion-Based Composite Membranes with Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes (pages 2653–2656)

      Ramaiyan Kannan, Bhalchandra A. Kakade and Vijayamohanan K. Pillai

      Version of Record online: 21 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704343

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      Fuel efficiency: Enhanced proton conductivity is obtained by the incorporation of single-walled carbon nanotubes prefunctionalized with sulfonic acid groups (S-SWCNTs) into a Nafion matrix (see scheme). The acid content of the CNT connects the hydrophobic regions of the membrane, thus providing a network for proton mobility. The polymer electrolyte membranes also have improved mechanical stability in H2/O2 fuel cells.

    18. Ternary Complexes Comprising Cucurbit[10]uril, Porphyrins, and Guests (pages 2657–2660)

      Simin Liu, Atindra D. Shukla, Suresh Gadde, Brian D. Wagner, Angel E. Kaifer and Lyle Isaacs

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705346

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      As easy as pi: The spacious 870-Å3 cavity of CB[10] is able to accommodate free base and metalated tetra(N-methylpyridyl)porphyrins inside. The complexes blend the advantageous recognition and photophysical properties of these two classes of macrocycles and promote the formation ternary complexes (see picture) in water through π–π stacking interactions.

    19. Reactions of a Ditriptycyl-Substituted Selenoseleninate and Related Compounds with a Platinum(0) Complex: Formation of Selenaplatinacycle and Hydrido Selenolato Platinum(II) Complexes (pages 2661–2664)

      Akihiko Ishii, Norio Nakata, Rei Uchiumi and Keiko Murakami

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705336

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      A selenaplatinacycle (see structure 1; red P, blue Pt, green Se) is formed by the reactions of TripSe(O)SeTrip (Trip = 9-triptycyl) and TripSeOH with [Pt(PPh3)22-C2H4)] by intramolecular C[BOND]H activation leading to the cyclometalation. The reaction of TripSeSeTrip with [Pt(PPh3)22-C2H4)] also provided 1 together with TripSeH, which reacts with [Pt(PPh3)22-C2H4)] to give the hydrido selenolato platinum(II) complex 2.

    20. Arsenic-Containing Long-Chain Fatty Acids in Cod-Liver Oil: A Result of Biosynthetic Infidelity? (pages 2665–2667)

      Alice Rumpler, John S. Edmonds, Mariko Katsu, Kenneth B. Jensen, Walter Goessler, Georg Raber, Helga Gunnlaugsdottir and Kevin A. Francesconi

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705405

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      A bit fishy: Six arsenolipids have been isolated from cod-liver oil and identified by HPLC and mass spectrometry as a series of arsenic-containing long-chain fatty acids (for example, see picture). These fatty acids account for about 20 % of the total arsenolipid content of cod-liver oil.

    21. Palladium-Catalyzed Intermolecular Ene–Yne Coupling: Development of an Atom-Efficient Mizoroki–Heck-Type Reaction (pages 2668–2672)

      Anders T. Lindhardt (neé Hansen), Mette Louise H. Mantel and Troels Skrydstrup

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705558

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      Direct and to the point: A palladium(II) catalytic system based on a palladium hydride species provides access to highly substituted 1,3-dienes through a direct coupling of alkynes with alkenes in a base-free Mizoroki–Heck-type reaction with full atom economy (see scheme; R=amide, borate, C(OH)Me2, O[BOND]alkyl).

    22. Asymmetric Direct Amide Synthesis by Kinetic Amine Resolution: A Chiral Bifunctional Aminoboronic Acid Catalyzed Reaction between a Racemic Amine and an Achiral Carboxylic Acid (pages 2673–2676)

      Kenny Arnold, Bryan Davies, Damien Hérault and Andrew Whiting

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705643

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      Let's resolve this: A planar chiral benzimidazole ferroceneboronic acid catalyst demonstrates low to moderate asymmetric induction in the kinetic resolution of racemic α-substituted benzylamines by direct amide formation with achiral carboxylic acids (see scheme).

    23. Exploring the Differential Recognition of DNA G-Quadruplex Targets by Small Molecules Using Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry (pages 2677–2680)

      Anthony Bugaut, Katja Jantos, Jean-Luc Wietor, Raphaël Rodriguez, Jeremy K. M. Sanders and Shankar Balasubramanian

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705589

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      Tuning affinities: Dynamic combinatorial chemistry has been employed to explore the effect of chemical modifications on the DNA G-quadruplex binding properties of an oxazole-based peptide macrocycle. Two dynamic libraries of molecules, containing cationic and carbohydrate motifs, respectively, were screened by using structurally diverse nucleic acid targets (see scheme; each colored shape represents a cation or carbohydrate).

    24. An Iron Nitride Complex (pages 2681–2684)

      Carola Vogel, Frank W. Heinemann, Jörg Sutter, Christian Anthon and Karsten Meyer

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800600

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      High on nitride: Discrete iron nitride complexes stabilized by N-anchored tris(carbene) ligands have been synthesized (see picture). These high-valent FeIV[TRIPLE BOND]N complexes are stable at room temperature, which allows their full spectroscopic and—for the first time—crystallographic characterization.

    25. Direct Light-Driven Modulation of Luminescence from Mn-Doped ZnSe Quantum Dots (pages 2685–2688)

      Scott E. Irvine, Thorsten Staudt, Eva Rittweger, Johann Engelhardt and Stefan W. Hell

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705111

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      Unlimited possibilities: Light-driven modulation of the fluorescence from Mn-doped ZnSe quantum nanocrystals has been established through excited-state absorption and its direct competition with spontaneous emission. Such optical control over electronic transitions enables far-field fluorescence microscopy analysis with diffraction-unlimited resolution (45 nm, red) based on quantum dots (confocal imaging has a resolution of 200 nm, blue).

    26. Templated Amplification of an Unexpected Receptor for C70 (pages 2689–2692)

      Jean-Luc Wietor, G. Dan Pantoş and Jeremy K. M. Sanders

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704983

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      C70mixes things up: C70 fullerene triggers the formation of a supramolecular receptor based on amino acid functionalized naphthalene diimides. This hexameric receptor is formed at the expense of a supramolecular helical nanotube (see picture) and highlights the dynamic combinatorial nature of hydrogen-bonded scaffolds.

    27. Solvent Effects in Carbohydrate Binding by Synthetic Receptors: Implications for the Role of Water in Natural Carbohydrate Recognition (pages 2693–2696)

      Emmanuel Klein, Yann Ferrand, Nicholas P. Barwell and Anthony P. Davis

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704733

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      How do they do it? Carbohydrates are intrinsically difficult to bind in water. Lectins and other proteins succeed, but do they use polar or hydrophobic interactions? Studies of synthetic lectins in mixed solvent systems shed new light onto this contentious issue (see scheme; X=hydrophobic or hydrophilic solubilizing groups; R=H or alkyl group).

    28. Introducing Distinctly Different Chemical Functionalities onto the Internal and External Surfaces of Mesoporous Materials (pages 2697–2699)

      Kristopher A. Kilian, Till Böcking, Katharina Gaus and J. Justin Gooding

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704784

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      The ins and outs of it: The external and internal surfaces of mesoporous materials can be modified independently by exploiting the wetting behavior of the pores modified with a hydrophobic activated monolayer. To demonstrate the principle, porous silicon photonic crystals were modified with ligands promoting cell adhesion on the top of the crystal and with different functionalities on the inside of the crystal.

    29. A New Generation of Specific Trypanosoma cruzi trans-Sialidase Inhibitors (pages 2700–2703)

      Sabrina Buchini, Alejandro Buschiazzo and Stephen G. Withers

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705435

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      A substitution for inhibition: The incorporation of an aryl substituent at C9 of 3-fluorosialyl fluorides provides specificity and dramatically slows the reactivation of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored surface protein Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase (TcTS) by transglycosylation (see picture). X-ray crystallographic analysis of the trapped intermediate has provided a structural rationale for this behavior.

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    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Reviews
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview

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