Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Angewandte Chemie International Edition

August 4, 2008

Volume 47, Issue 33

Pages 6089–6299

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireviews
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Matter-Wave Metrology as a Complementary Tool for Mass Spectrometry (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 33/2008) (page 6089)

      Stefan Gerlich, Michael Gring, Hendrik Ulbricht, Klaus Hornberger, Jens Tüxen, Marcel Mayor and Markus Arndt

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890160

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      An artist's view … of the matter-wave interferometer for large molecules is shown in the cover picture: the three-grating arrangement is seen through the window of the vacuum chamber. The molecular model in the foreground is a compound studied in the experiments reported by K. Hornberger, M. Mayor, M. Arndt et al. in their Communication on page 6195 ff. The compound's fragmentation behavior can be analyzed using quantum interferometry.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireviews
    9. Review
    10. Communications
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    1. Inside Cover: Stability and Shape of Hepatitis B Virus Capsids In Vacuo (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 33/2008) (page 6090)

      Charlotte Uetrecht, Cees Versluis, Norman R. Watts, Paul T. Wingfield, Alasdair C. Steven and Albert J. R. Heck

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890161

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      Precise biophysical characterization of macromolecular complexes is possible by mass spectrometry. Heck et al. report in their Communication on page 6247 ff. how two distinct icosahedral geometries of intact megaDalton capsids of the hepatitis B virus (a major human pathogen) can be measured and separated by mass spectrometry. Ion mobility measurements established that the viral structures are largely preserved in vacuo and two distinct conformers per capsid geometry could be distinguished.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireviews
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireviews
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  5. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireviews
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  6. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireviews
    9. Review
    10. Communications
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    1. 3D Protein Structures by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Ready for High Resolution (pages 6110–6113)

      Anja Böckmann

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801352

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      Protocols for determining high-resolution 3D structures of solid proteins are essential for structural studies of fibrils and membrane proteins. Advances in solid-state NMR spectroscopy have led to a multitude of approaches to access restraints and to calculate structures from highly ambiguous data sets. 3D structures at atomic resolution have been derived for several model proteins, as well as for the C-terminal portion of the Het-s prion protein.

  7. Minireviews

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    8. Minireviews
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    1. Halogen Bonding in Supramolecular Chemistry (pages 6114–6127)

      Pierangelo Metrangolo, Franck Meyer, Tullio Pilati, Giuseppe Resnati and Giancarlo Terraneo

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800128

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      Building bridges: Halogen bonding is a noncovalent interaction where halogen atoms function as electrophilic species (see picture; gray C, green F, violet I). Halogen bonding has an impact on all fields where the control of recognition and self-organization plays a key role. The potential of the interaction is also shown by useful applications in the field of material science and in biological systems.

    2. The Road to Non-Enzymatic Molecular Networks (pages 6128–6136)

      Zehavit Dadon, Nathaniel Wagner and Gonen Ashkenasy

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200702552

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      A systematic viewpoint: Recent progress in transforming minimal self-replicating systems into small networks of dynamically interacting molecules is reviewed. The authors suggest that such synthetic self-organized networks can provide useful models for studying the behavior of complex systems.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
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    1. Asymmetric Aminocatalysis—Gold Rush in Organic Chemistry (pages 6138–6171)

      Paolo Melchiorre, Mauro Marigo, Armando Carlone and Giuseppe Bartoli

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705523

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      Gold! Gold! Gold from the American River! The seminal reports on asymmetric catalysis with secondary amines attracted waves of researchers to the “gold mine” of organocatalysis. Particular challenges, milestones, and future directions of asymmetric aminocatalysis are discussed in this Review.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlight
    8. Minireviews
    9. Review
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    1. Subdiffraction-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging with Conventional Fluorescent Probes (pages 6172–6176)

      Mike Heilemann, Sebastian van de Linde, Mark Schüttpelz, Robert Kasper, Britta Seefeldt, Anindita Mukherjee, Philip Tinnefeld and Markus Sauer

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802376

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      Eagle eyes: dSTORM uses conventional photoswitchable fluorescent dyes that can be reversibly cycled between a fluorescent and a dark state by irradiation with light of different wavelengths (see picture). This elegant approach can visualize cellular structures with a resolution of approximately 20 nm, far beyond the diffraction limit of light, without the need of an activator molecule.

    2. A Practical, Self-Catalytic, Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Dioxide (pages 6177–6179)

      Julien Bachmann, Robert Zierold, Yuen Tung Chong, Roland Hauert, Chris Sturm, Rüdiger Schmidt-Grund, Bernd Rheinländer, Marius Grundmann, Ulrich Gösele and Kornelius Nielsch

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800245

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      Molecular self-attack: According to mythology, a scorpion may sting itself to death; similarly, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane catalyzes its own hydrolysis in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of SiO2 thin films and nanostructures. Between 120 and 200 °C, the growth rate is constant at 0.06 nm per ALD cycle. The SiO2 films are chemically and optically pure. SiO2 nanotubes of aspect ratio 500 exhibit smooth walls of accurately controlled thickness.

    3. Enantioselective Kinetic Resolution of trans-Cycloalkane-1,2-diols (pages 6180–6183)

      Christian E. Müller, Lukas Wanka, Kevin Jewell and Peter R. Schreiner

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800641

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      Finally! The title resolution is achieved with a nonnatural, partially rigid, lipophilic tetrapeptide at low catalyst loadings without additional base or cosolvents. The transition-state model (ball-and-stick model in the scheme; C gray, N blue, O red) emphasizes the interplay between hydrogen-bonding and hydrophobic interactions.

    4. Probing Protein–Chaperone Interactions with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy (pages 6184–6188)

      Frank Hillger, Dominik Hänni, Daniel Nettels, Sonja Geister, Michelle Grandin, Marcus Textor and Benjamin Schuler

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800298

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      Molecular chaperones aid protein folding in the cell, but their effects on the conformation of the substrate protein have largely eluded experimental investigation. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was used to extract structural and dynamic information from a protein–chaperone complex (see figure; yellow: rhodanase, blue: GroEL). This approach will aid in a more physical understanding of the role of cellular factors in protein folding.

    5. Total Synthesis of the Tetracyclic Sesquiterpene (±)-Punctaporonin C (pages 6189–6191)

      Martin Fleck and Thorsten Bach

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801534

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      Tailor made for the target molecule 2, the carbon skeleton of the epoxide 1 was integrated entirely into the natural product. A regioselective intramolecular [2+2] photocycloaddition and subsequent Wacker oxidation enabled the specific and successive incorporation of the two terminal double bonds of 1 into the unusual oxatetracyclo[6.3.2.01,4.05,13]tridecane skeleton of 2, which was synthesized in 24 steps and 2.0 % overall yield. TBDMS=tert-butyldimethylsilyl.

    6. Establishing the Chelating α-Azocarbonyl Function in π-Acceptor Ligands (pages 6192–6194)

      Sayak Roy, Monika Sieger, Biprajit Sarkar, Brigitte Schwederski, Falk Lissner, Thomas Schleid, Jan Fiedler and Wolfgang Kaim

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801328

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      Strong acceptor, weak coordination: The heterodinuclear complex ion [LCu(dppf)]+ (see formula) contains the as yet unrecognized strong π-acceptor system N[DOUBLE BOND]N[BOND]C[DOUBLE BOND]O, which is involved in a charge-transfer interaction with the copper center but is not reduced through full electron transfer. This situation is likely caused by steric hindrance and the donor function of the dialkylamino substituents on the C[DOUBLE BOND]O carbon atom.

    7. Matter-Wave Metrology as a Complementary Tool for Mass Spectrometry (pages 6195–6198)

      Stefan Gerlich, Michael Gring, Hendrik Ulbricht, Klaus Hornberger, Jens Tüxen, Marcel Mayor and Markus Arndt

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801942

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      Quantum interferometry can serve as a useful complement to mass spectrometry. The interference visibility (see picture) reveals important information on molecular properties, such as mass and polarizability. The method is applicable to a wide range of molecules, and is particularly valuable for characterizing neutral molecular beams. In particular, fragmentation in the source can be distinguished from molecular dissociation in the detector.

    8. Short Formal Synthesis of (−)-Platencin (pages 6199–6200)

      Konrad Tiefenbacher and Johann Mulzer

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801441

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      Short and sweet: A five-step, protecting-group-free formal synthesis of (−)-platencin from commercially available (−)-perillaldehyde (see retrosynthetic scheme) features a highly diastereoselective Diels–Alder reaction and a ring-closing metathesis as key steps.

    9. Concise Synthesis of the Tricyclic Core of Platencin (pages 6201–6203)

      Sang Young Yun, Jun-Cheng Zheng and Daesung Lee

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801587

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      A radical change: Implementation of a radical-mediated rearrangement of the bicyclo[3.2.1]octyl moiety to the bicyclo[2.2.2]octane structure has enabled a concise synthesis of the tricyclic core of platencin, a newly discovered antibiotic. An intramolecular aldol and a ring-closing metathesis reaction were subsequently used to complete the synthesis of the tricycle (see scheme).

    10. C1-(C84-C2(11))(CF3)12: Trifluoromethylation Yields Structural Proof of a Minor C84 Cage and Reveals a Principle of Higher Fullerene Reactivity (pages 6204–6207)

      Ivan E. Kareev, Igor V. Kuvychko, Natalia B. Shustova, Sergei F. Lebedkin, Vyacheslav P. Bubnov, Oren P. Anderson, Alexey A. Popov, Olga V. Boltalina and Steven H. Strauss

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801777

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      Ribbon pattern: An isomer of C84(CF3)12 fullerene with the C84-C2(11) cage (see molecular structure determined by X-ray crystallography) demonstrates a new principle of hollow higher fullerene reactivity: For 1,4-additions of bulky groups that produce ribbons or loops of edge-sharing p-C6X2 hexagons, the “most reactive” double bonds remain intact.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Tuning the Basicity of Synergic Bimetallic Reagents: Switching the Regioselectivity of the Direct Dimetalation of Toluene from 2,5- to 3,5-Positions (pages 6208–6211)

      Victoria L. Blair, Luca M. Carrella, William Clegg, Ben Conway, Ross W. Harrington, Lorna M. Hogg, Jan Klett, Robert E. Mulvey, Eva Rentschler and Luca Russo

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801158

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      Metameta metalation: Remarkably, toluene can be directly dimanganated or dimagnesiated at the 3,5-positions using bimetallic bases with active Me3SiCH2 ligands (see scheme, blue). In contrast, n-butyl ligands lead to 2,5-metalation (red). tmp=2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide.

    12. Iridium-Catalyzed Dehydrocoupling of Primary Amine–Borane Adducts: A Route to High Molecular Weight Polyaminoboranes, Boron–Nitrogen Analogues of Polyolefins (pages 6212–6215)

      Anne Staubitz, Alejandro Presa Soto and Ian Manners

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801197

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      The B all and N all: Soluble, linear, high molecular weight polyaminoborane homopolymers and copolymers have been synthesized by iridium-catalyzed dehydrocoupling of readily available amine–borane adducts RNH2⋅BH3 (R=H, Me, nBu).

    13. Rotational Probes of Six Conformers of Neutral Cysteine (pages 6216–6220)

      M. Eugenia Sanz, Susana Blanco, Juan C. López and José L. Alonso

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801337

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      Six of one: Vaporization of solid cysteine by laser ablation followed by the generation of a supersonic jet in a vacuum chamber has enabled six low-energy conformers of this amino acid to be characterized by using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (see picture). The information provided by this technique is directly comparable with that predicted from in vacuo ab initio computations.

    14. Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for the Direct Formation of H2O2 from H2 and O2 (pages 6221–6224)

      Qingsheng Liu, J. Chris Bauer, Raymond E. Schaak and Jack H. Lunsford

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801517

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      Ex situ synthesis is the key: Palladium nanoparticles having a narrow size distribution around 3.6 nm have been synthesized in a liquid phase and then loaded onto a carbon support with an overall efficiency of 85 %. The resulting nanoparticles, which retained their size and morphology, were exceptionally active and selective as a catalyst for the direct formation of H2O2 from H2 and O2 in ethanol.

    15. Metal Carbene Dimerization: Versatile Approach to Polyalkynylethenes (pages 6225–6228)

      José Barluenga, Diana de Sáa, Aránzazu Gómez, Alfredo Ballesteros, Javier Santamaría, Ana de Prado, Miguel Tomás and Angel L. Suárez-Sobrino

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801584

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      Heads or tails? Chemo-, regio-, and stereoselective access to cross- and linear conjugated poly-ynene scaffolds from alkynyl-derived group six metal carbenes is reported. The metal carbenes shown (M=Cr, W; TIPS=triisopropylsilyl) readily undergo low-temperature, tail-to-tail dimerization in the presence of potassium tert-butoxide by reaction at either of the Cβ atoms to provide E-polyalkynylethenes.

    16. Mesoporous Silica Nanosphere Supported Ruthenium Catalysts for Asymmetric Hydrogenation (pages 6229–6232)

      David J. Mihalcik and Wenbin Lin

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705656

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      Chiral Ruthenium–diphosphine–diamine complexes with a siloxy pendant are grafted onto mesoporous silica nanospheres. The resulting supported ruthenium catalysts are highly active for the asymmetric hydrogenation of aromatic ketones to afford chiral secondary alcohols and racemic aryl aldehydes to give chiral primary alcohols (see scheme). This immobilization strategy should be amenable to the design of similar heterogeneous catalysts.

    17. Highly Stereoselective Ring Expansion Reactions Mediated by Attractive Cation–n Interactions (pages 6233–6235)

      Timothy Ribelin, Christopher E. Katz, Donna G. English, Sherriel Smith, Anna K. Manukyan, Victor W. Day, Benjamin Neuenswander, Jennifer L. Poutsma and Jeffrey Aubé

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801591

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      Gaining control: An attractive electrostatic force stabilizes the conformation of an intermediate (see scheme; n=nonbonded electron), thus controlling the leaving group configuration to give superior diastereoselectivity in an asymmetric ring expansion.

    18. Energetic Nitrogen-Rich Derivatives of 1,5-Diaminotetrazole (pages 6236–6239)

      Young-Hyuk Joo, Brendan Twamley, Sonali Garg and Jean'ne M. Shreeve

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801886

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      High-energy-density materials can be obtained by reaction of monosubstituted hydrazines with cyanogen azide to generate 1,5-diaminotetrazole derivatives. Azidohydrazones are postulated as intermediates in this reaction (see scheme).

    19. A Simple Unimolecular Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (pages 6240–6243)

      Matteo Amelia, Massimo Baroncini and Alberto Credi

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802018

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      Simple but effective! 8-Methoxyquinoline, an unsophisticated fluorophore, displays both 2:1 multiplexer and 1:2 demultiplexer digital functions (see picture). Protonation of the fluorophore results in completely different optical spectral profiles and multiplexing/demultiplexing behavior is obtained by exploiting the proton-driven reversible modulation of two complementary absorption and fluorescence signals.

    20. Entry to Heterocycles Based on Indium-Catalyzed Conia-Ene Reactions: Asymmetric Synthesis of (−)-Salinosporamide A (pages 6244–6246)

      Keisuske Takahashi, Michiko Midori, Kei Kawano, Jun Ishihara and Susumi Hatakeyama

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801967

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      Conica can: The In(OTf)3-catalyzed cyclization of nitrogen- and oxygen-tethered acetylenic malonic esters gives five- to seven-membered heterocycles in moderate to excellent yields (see scheme; Tf=trifluoromethanesulfonyl). The asymmetric synthesis of (−)-salinosporamide A illustrates the synthetic utility of the method.

    21. Stability and Shape of Hepatitis B Virus Capsids In Vacuo (pages 6247–6251)

      Charlotte Uetrecht, Cees Versluis, Norman R. Watts, Paul T. Wingfield, Alasdair C. Steven and Albert J. R. Heck

      Version of Record online: 18 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802410

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      Viruses at a glance: Ion mobility mass spectrometry allows the identification and differentiation of states in a viral assembly not only by mass but also by conformation. This approach has been used to obtain a biophysical characterization of the hepatitis B virus capsids, and has shown that of its two distinct icosahedral geometries, the spherical capsid structure is preserved in vacuo (see picture).

    22. Capitalizing on Differing Coordination Environments and Redox Potentials to Prepare an Ordered Heterobimetallic UVI/NpIV Diphosphonate (pages 6252–6254)

      Anna-Gay D. Nelson, Travis H. Bray and Thomas E. Albrecht-Schmitt

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801981

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      Order out of chaos: The reduction of NpVI to NpIV readily occurs under mild hydrothermal conditions in the presence of phosphonates, sharply contrasting with UVI, which maintains its oxidation state under identical conditions. By coupling the differing redox potentials of UVI and NpVI with the vastly different coordination chemistry of UVI and NpIV, the first example of an ordered UVI/NpIV phosphonate is prepared (see structure: U green, Np purple (large), O red, P purple (small)).

    23. Self-Assembly of a Cavitand-Based Capsule by Dynamic Boronic Ester Formation (pages 6255–6258)

      Naoki Nishimura and Kenji Kobayashi

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802293

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      Be my guest: Two molecules of a cavitand tetraboronic acid and four molecules of a bis(catechol) linker quantitatively assemble into a capsule (see picture for two views), with highly selective guest-recognition, by dynamic boronic ester formation. The on/off control of capsule formation with guest encapsulation is achieved by removal/addition of methanol.

    24. A Hybrid Nanoparticle Probe for Dual-Modality Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pages 6259–6262)

      Jin-sil Choi, Jeong Chan Park, Hyunsoo Nah, Seungtae Woo, Jieun Oh, Kyeong Min Kim, Gi Jeong Cheon, Yongmin Chang, Jeongsoo Yoo and Jinwoo Cheon

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801369

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      Creating a good image: A probe for combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has high colloidal stability and demonstrates facile conjugation ability. Sentinel lymph nodes are clearly identified in the fusion image (see picture; I: injection site) because of the complementary nature of the techniques, which makes accurate anatomical information and fault-free diagnosis possible.

    25. In Situ ATRP-Mediated Hierarchical Formation of Giant Amphiphile Bionanoreactors (pages 6263–6266)

      Benjamin Le Droumaguet and Kelly Velonia

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801007

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      Functional giants: Amphiphilic bioconjugates can be synthesized in situ by grafting polystyrene from a protein (see scheme). The resulting giant amphiphiles display low polydispersities and the characteristic aggregation properties of amphiphilic biomacromolecules. A second, catalytically active guest protein can also be included within the superstructures.

    26. An Electroactive Catalytic Dynamic Substrate that Immobilizes and Releases Patterned Ligands, Proteins, and Cells (pages 6267–6271)

      Eugene W. L. Chan, Sungjin Park and Muhammad N. Yousaf

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800166

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      Dynamic release: A quinone-terminated self-assembled monolayer captures and releases ligands and cells in situ through a pH-dependent electrochemical potential. The surface is catalytic for multiple rounds of immobilization/release. When combined with a photochemical approach, peptide ligands that mediate cell attachment are captured and released on defined gradient patterns (see picture).

    27. Critical Size for Intracluster Proton Transfer from Water to an Anion (pages 6272–6274)

      Israel Wolf, Avraham Shapira, Rina Giniger, Yifat Miller, R. Benny Gerber and Ori Cheshnovsky

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800542

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      Bigger is better: Proton transfer in the electronic ground state for (C6H5NH)⋅ (H2O)n has been investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy. At a critical size of n=3, one proton of a water molecule is captured by the deprotonated aniline to form solvated OH (see picture). These experimental observations are supported by ab initio calculations that establish the greater stability of the solvated OH anion for n≥3.

    28. Preferential Solvation and Hydrogen Bonding in Mixed Solvents (pages 6275–6277)

      Joanne L. Cook, Christopher A. Hunter, Caroline M. R. Low, Alejandro Perez-Velasco and Jeremy G. Vinter

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801349

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      Oak trees from acorns: A small amount (<1 %) of a cosolvent can change the stability of the H-bonded complex on the right-hand side of the equation by an order of magnitude. Mixtures of chloroform and THF were found to be more polar than either of the pure solvents by using this complex as a molecular-recognition probe of solvation. A quantitative interpretation based on preferential solvation accounts for the properties of solvent mixtures.

    29. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Oxidative Cross-Coupling of Chelating Arenes and Cycloalkanes (pages 6278–6282)

      Guojun Deng, Liang Zhao and Chao-Jun Li

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801544

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      Alkane and arene join together: Various arenes were coupled directly with simple cycloalkanes. The reaction was catalyzed by ruthenium under oxidative conditions to give substituted cycloalkylarenes regioselectively (see scheme).

    30. An Epilogue on the C78-Fullerene Family: The Discovery and Characterization of an Elusive Isomer (pages 6283–6285)

      Kalin S. Simeonov, Konstantin Yu. Amsharov, Evangelos Krokos and Martin Jansen

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801922

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      Missing relative found: The last representative of the first multi membered fullerene family, C78(4), has been synthesized and isolated. Its connectivity pattern was confirmed by a single-crystal X-ray analysis of its chlorinated derivative C78(4)Cl18 (see picture). The crystal structure also reveals the presence of unusual, short intermolecular chlorine contacts.

    31. Phosphorescent, Terdentate, Liquid-Crystalline Complexes of Platinum(II): Stimulus-Dependent Emission (pages 6286–6289)

      Valery N. Kozhevnikov, Bertrand Donnio and Duncan W. Bruce

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802101

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      Liquid crystals shining bright. A highly efficient platinum(II) luminophore is rendered liquid crystalline using a simple and flexible synthetic approach. Ordering in the liquid-crystalline state allows monomer emission when the characteristic for the material is exciplex-like emission. More than that, emission characteristics are subject to tribological control, with the initial state re-obtained by thermal cycling.

    32. Calcium Amidoborane Hydrogen Storage Materials: Crystal Structures of Decomposition Products (pages 6290–6295)

      Jan Spielmann, Georg Jansen, Heinz Bandmann and Sjoerd Harder

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802037

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      A model solution to hydrogen storage? The recently introduced hydrogen storage material [{Ca(NH2BH3)2}n] has been investigated on a molecular level. A hydrocarbon-soluble calcium amidoborane complex eliminates H2 spontaneously at the very low temperature of 20–40 °C (see scheme). The decomposition product shows a dimeric species with a bridging [HN[BOND]BH[BOND]NH[BOND]BH3]2− ion that is isolobal to the allylic dianion [HC[BOND]CH[BOND]CH[BOND]CH3]2−.

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