Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 47 Issue 35

August 18, 2008

Volume 47, Issue 35

Pages 6495–6725

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: A Highly Emissive Fluorescent Nucleoside that Signals the Activity of Toxic Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 35/2008) (page 6495)

      Seergazhi G. Srivatsan, Nicholas J. Greco and Yitzhak Tor

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890170

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      Ribosome-inactivating proteins, … such as ricin, are among the most poisonous toxins known. Despite their simple isolation from natural sources (shown is Ricinus communis, or castor bean plant), there is a lack of useful therapeutics or field detection tools. In their Communication on page 6661 ff. Y. Tor et al. describe RNA constructs that are complementary to the α-sarcin/ricin RNA substrate and signal the depurination of a specific adenosine residue. (Picture source: O. T. Thomé, Flora von Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz, 1885, Gera.)

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: A Discrete Supramolecular Conglomerate Composed of Two Saddle-Distorted Zinc(II)-Phthalocyanine Complexes and a Doubly Protonated Porphyrin with Saddle Distortion Undergoing Efficient Photoinduced Electron Transfer (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 35/2008) (page 6496)

      Takahiko Kojima, Tatsuhiko Honda, Kei Ohkubo, Motoo Shiro, Takahiro Kusukawa, Takamitsu Fukuda, Nagao Kobayashi and Shunichi Fukuzumi

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890171

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      A supramolecular conglomerate composed of a saddle-distorted, diprotonated porphyrin dication and two saddle-distorted zinc(II)–phthalocyanine complexes (see picture) is described by T. Kojima et al. in their Communication on page 6712 ff. The conglomerate undergoes photoinduced electron transfer from the zinc(II)-phthalocyanine to the porphyrin dication to generate an electron-transfer state with a lifetime of 667 ps.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 35/2008 (pages 6499–6511)

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890172

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  5. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  6. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Amyloid Dissociation

      Cold- and Pressure-Induced Dissociation of Protein Aggregates and Amyloid Fibrils (pages 6518–6521)

      Rajesh Mishra and Roland Winter

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802027

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      Cold denaturation (including supercooling) and pressure perturbation are able to dissolve protein aggregates and, in some cases, amyloid fibrils (see picture). These studies provide additional details on the polymorphic forms of amyloid structures and their precursors as well as the transformation processes between polymorphic states.

    2. Protein Structures

      Metals Coordinate Protein–Protein Interactions (pages 6522–6524)

      Kagan Kerman and Heinz-Bernhard Kraatz

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801169

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      When Protein met Metal: The ability of metal ions to coordinate the assembly of specific supramolecular protein complexes (see schematic representation) enables the development of experimental and bioinformatic techniques for probing protein–protein interactions.

  7. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Metal–Metal Complexes

      Direct Bonds Between Metal Atoms: Zn, Cd, and Hg Compounds with Metal–Metal Bonds (pages 6526–6536)

      Ernesto Carmona and Agustín Galindo

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704568

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      Sticking together: In the past few years, several compounds with stable Zn[BOND]Zn bonds have been reported, the existence of which was previously considered highly doubtful. Interest in this area was sparked by [Zn25-C5Me5)2], in which the [Zn[BOND]Zn]2+ unit is coordinated by two eclipsed C5Me5 ligands (see structure; Zn green, C gray). Homologous Cd and Hg species have been discovered as well.

  8. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Nanoelectronics

      Light-Emitting Diodes with Semiconductor Nanocrystals (pages 6538–6549)

      Andrey L. Rogach, Nikolai Gaponik, John M. Lupton, Cristina Bertoni, Diego E. Gallardo, Steve Dunn, Nello Li Pira, Marzia Paderi, Piermario Repetto, Sergei G. Romanov, Colm O'Dwyer, Clivia M. Sotomayor Torres and Alexander Eychmüller

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705109

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      Small things bright and beautiful: research into light-emitting diodes (LEDs) made from semiconductor nanocrystals has advanced significantly in just one decade: external quantum efficiency has improved by over two orders of magnitude and highly saturated color emission is now the norm (see picture; nano-crystalbased LED and size-dependent photoluminescence of CdTe nanocrystals). The nanocrystal devices have potential advantages over purely organic LEDs such as spectrally pure emission.

    2. Nanotechnology

      Carbon Nanotube Gas and Vapor Sensors (pages 6550–6570)

      Douglas R. Kauffman and Alexander Star

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200704488

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      Big things from small materials: The incorporation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into electronic devices has led to the development of extremely sensitive and compact chemical sensors (see the model of a transistor with a CNT between two electrodes). These sensors utilize the unique phenomena occurring at the surface of nanometer-sized structures for the detection of trace amounts of gas- and vapor-phase analytes.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Book Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Minireview
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Coupling Reactions

      Nickel-Mediated Coupling Reactions of Carboryne with Alkenes: A Synthetic Route to Alkenylcarboranes (pages 6572–6575)

      Zaozao Qiu and Zuowei Xie

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801958

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      Happily coupled: A nickel–carboryne complex 1 reacts with substituted styrenes 2 to afford alkenylcarboranes in moderate to very good yields with excellent regio- and steroselectivity. Either the “Heck-type” (3) or the “ene-reaction-type” product (4) could be isolated (see scheme). A reaction mechanism that involves alkene insertion followed by successive β-H elimination and reductive elimination steps is proposed.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Nickel-Mediated Coupling Reactions of Carboryne with Alkenes: A Synthetic Route to Alkenylcarboranes

      Vol. 47, Issue 40, 7580, Article first published online: 22 SEP 2008

    2. Natural Product Synthesis

      High-Pressure Entry into Platencin (pages 6576–6578)

      Dennis C. J. Waalboer, Mark C. Schaapman, Floris L. van Delft and Floris P. J. T. Rutjes

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802912

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      Bacteria under pressure! An efficient synthesis of the enantiopure tricyclic core of a recently discovered antibiotic, platencin, has been developed. This synthesis highlights a novel high-pressure Diels–Alder reaction of the flavoring agent (S)-(−)-perillaldehyde and an efficient SmI2-mediated pinacol cyclization for the construction of the bicyclo[2.2.2]octane framework (see scheme).

    3. Total Syntheses and Structural Revision of α- and β-Diversonolic Esters and Total Syntheses of Diversonol and Blennolide C (pages 6579–6582)

      K. C. Nicolaou and Ang Li

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802632

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      Expedient total syntheses of the originally proposed structures of the naturally occurring α- and β-diversonolic esters (1 and 2) and diversonol (3) lead to the revision of the structures of 1 and 2 to 4 and 5, respectively (see structures).

    4. Surface Chemistry

      Hydrocarbon Chain Growth on V(100) Single-Crystal Surfaces via Vinyl Intermediates (pages 6583–6585)

      Min Shen and Francisco Zaera

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802338

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      A four-step mechanism for thermal activation of methylene species on V(100) surfaces to generate propene is identified experimentally (see scheme). Dehydrogenation of methylene to methylidyne and coupling with another methylene group gives a vinyl intermediate, which reacts with a methylene group to form an allyl species, which is finally hydrogenated to propene. This provides evidence for the possible role of vinyl intermediates in Fischer–Tropsch synthesis.

    5. Synthetic Methods

      Synthesis of Enantioenriched α-(Hydroxyalkyl)-tri-n-butylstannanes (pages 6586–6589)

      Anyu He and John R. Falck

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802313

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      Li and Mg are pesky: A catalytic asymmetric synthesis of α-(hydroxyalkyl)-tri-n-butylstannanes (1) in good to excellent yields and enantioselectivities was achieved (see scheme; PG=protecting group; L*=chiral ligand). Compound 1 was isolated as an ester or thiocarbamate, and the reagent was prepared from equimolar amounts of nBu3SnH and Et2Zn in dimethoxyethane. Conditions employing lithium or magnesium ions suppress enantioselectivity.

    6. CO2 Fixation

      Efficient Fixation of Carbon Dioxide by Hypervalent Organobismuth Oxide, Hydroxide, and Alkoxide (pages 6590–6593)

      Shuang-Feng Yin, Junpei Maruyama, Takashi Yamashita and Shigeru Shimada

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802277

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      Keeping the lid on CO2: Atmospheric CO2 can be trapped irreversibly by hypervalent organobismuth oxide and hydroxide compounds, while an analogous alkoxide binds this greenhouse gas reversibly (see scheme). The hypervalent nature of the bismuth compounds is shown to play a decisive roll in these reactions.

    7. Synthetic Methods

      [1,5]-Hydride Transfer/Cyclizations on Alkynyl Fischer Carbene Complexes: Synthesis of 1,2-Dihydroquinolinyl Carbene Complexes and Cascade Reactions (pages 6594–6597)

      José Barluenga, Martín Fañanás-Mastral, Fernando Aznar and Carlos Valdés

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802268

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      Trigger happy: A new cascade process initiated by an unprecedented [1,5]-hydride transfer/cyclization of ortho-aminophenyl alkynyl Fischer carbene complexes leads to the formation of new 1,2-dihydroquinolinyl carbene complexes and 5,6-dihydrophenantridine derivatives (see scheme).

    8. Nitrogen Oxides

      Fast Reductive Ligation of S-Nitrosothiols (pages 6598–6601)

      Hua Wang and Ming Xian

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801654

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      “Nitroso” knows: A process has been developed which converts unstable S-nitrosothiols into stable sulfenamide analogues (see scheme). Reductive ligation proceeds rapidly in mixed organic solvent/water systems to give high yields. By applying this reaction, an efficient strategy for detecting S-nitrosylation in proteins and other biological systems is envisioned.

    9. Immobilized Catalysts

      Parallel Synthesis and Screening of Polymer-Supported Phosphorus-Stereogenic Aminophosphane–Phosphite and –Phosphinite Ligands (pages 6602–6605)

      René den Heeten, Bert H. G. Swennenhuis, Piet W. N. M. van Leeuwen, Johannes G. de Vries and Paul C. J. Kamer

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801689

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      Bound to Ps: An efficient, rapid, parallel solid-phase synthesis of a series of resin-bound P-stereogenic aminophosphane–phosphinite and –phosphite ligands is developed (see scheme). The ligands form active hydrogenation catalysts, displaying moderate to good enantioselectivities.

    10. Boryl Anions

      Syntheses, Structures, and Reactivities of Borylcopper and -zinc Compounds: 1,4-Silaboration of an α,β-Unsaturated Ketone to Form a γ-Siloxyallylborane (pages 6606–6610)

      Takashi Kajiwara, Tomomi Terabayashi, Makoto Yamashita and Kyoko Nozaki

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801728

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      New borylcopper and borylzinc compounds were synthesized by transmetalation of boryllithium with metal halides. The 1,4-addition of lithium borylbromocuprate [BCu(μ2-Br)Li(thf)3] to 2-cyclohexen-1-one as a boryl anion, followed by trapping of the resulting boron-substituted copper enolate with Me3SiCl, afforded the γ-siloxyallylborane.

    11. Diffusion in Porous Materials

      Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Study of Methane Diffusion in Metal Organic Frameworks MIL-47(V) and MIL-53(Cr) (pages 6611–6615)

      Nilton Rosenbach Jr., Hervé Jobic, Aziz Ghoufi, Fabrice Salles, Guillaume Maurin, Sandrine Bourrelly, Philip L. Llewellyn, Thomas Devic, Christian Serre and Gérard Férey

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801748

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      Channel tunnel: Diffusion of methane in the metal–organic frameworks MIL-53(Cr) and MIL-47(V) was elucidated by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation, and 1D diffusion of CH4 along the channels was found in both materials. The self-diffusivity of methane at low loading is very large, more than one order of magnitude higher than in zeolites. The picture shows CH4 molecules in a MIL-53(Cr) channel.

    12. Molecular Switches

      Toward Fluorescent Memories with Nondestructive Readout: Photoswitching of Fluorescence by Intramolecular Electron Transfer in a Diaryl Ethene-Perylene Bisimide Photochromic System (pages 6616–6619)

      Martin Berberich, Ana-Maria Krause, Michele Orlandi, Franco Scandola and Frank Würthner

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802007

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      Flicking a switch: Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs between the perylene and the closed (but not the open) form of the diarylethene unit in a prototype optical memory system based on a photochromic diarylethene-perylene bisimide dyad (see picture). This allows three different wavelengths to be used for the read, write, and erase steps without destructive readout occurring by photochromic cycloreversion.

    13. Synthetic Methods

      Germanium(II)-Mediated Reductive Mannich-Type Reaction of α-Bromoketones to N-Alkylimines (pages 6620–6623)

      Shin-ya Tanaka, Nobuo Tagashira, Kouji Chiba, Makoto Yasuda and Akio Baba

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800194

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      A versatile metal: Germanium was effectively used in a novel and efficient method for the Mannich-type reaction between α-bromoketones and simple N-alkyl imines (see scheme). Germanium(II) acts as a reducing agent, forming a nucleophile for C[BOND]C bond formation. The Mannich adduct is effectively stabilized by the germanium center. Various N-alkylaldimines, including enolizable imines and formaldimines, can be used in this reaction system.

    14. Organocatalysis

      Evidence for an Enol Mechanism in a Highly Enantioselective Mannich-Type Reaction Catalyzed by Primary Amine–Thiourea (pages 6624–6628)

      Denis A. Yalalov, Svetlana B. Tsogoeva, Tatyana E. Shubina, Irina M. Martynova and Timothy Clark

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800849

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      A tale of two mechanismsenol versus enamine: Chiral primary amine–thiourea 1 catalyzes highly enantioselective Mannich-type addition of unmodified ketones to N-benzoylhydrazones (see scheme). The reaction does not require preformed enolate equivalents, and the computational data for the mechanism indicates a preference for 1-complexed enol intermediates rather than enamine intermediates.

    15. Photocurrent Generation

      CdS Nanoparticles/β-Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Electrodes for Enhanced Photoelectrochemistry (pages 6629–6633)

      Huseyin Bekir Yildiz, Ran Tel-Vered and Itamar Willner

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801141

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      Changing direction: Gold electrodes have been linked to CdS nanoparticles through a β-cyclodextrin bridging unit (see scheme). The encapsulation of I3 or N,N′-dioctyl-4,4′-bipyridinium (octyl viologen) in the β-cyclodextrin cavities leads to enhanced photocurrents that are direction-controlled by the nature of the guest or by the addition of an inhibitor.

    16. Synthetic Methods

      Asymmetric Diels–Alder Reactions of α,β-Unsaturated Aldehydes Catalyzed by a Diarylprolinol Silyl Ether Salt in the Presence of Water (pages 6634–6637)

      Yujiro Hayashi, Sampak Samanta, Hiroaki Gotoh and Hayato Ishikawa

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801408

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      Water, water, everywhere: The title reaction predominantly affords the exo isomer with excellent enantioselectivity (see scheme; TMS=trimethylsilyl). The synthesis can be carried out without organic solvents and provides the products by distillation. Water increases the rate and enantioselectivity of the reaction.

    17. Aerobic Oxidation

      Ruthenium Porphyrin-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidation of Terminal Aryl Alkenes to Aldehydes by a Tandem Epoxidation–Isomerization Pathway (pages 6638–6642)

      Gaoxi Jiang, Jian Chen, Hung-Yat Thu, Jie-Sheng Huang, Nianyong Zhu and Chi-Ming Che

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801500

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      Catalytic oxidation of 1-alkenes to aldehydes by an epoxidation–isomerization pathway with air or dioxygen as terminal oxidant has been realized for bulky ruthenium(VI) porphyrin catalysts. For the new, recyclable catalyst [RuVI(tmttp)O2], product yields of up to 99 % and total turnover numbers of up to 1144 were obtained.

    18. Asymmetric Catalysis

      [Ru(phgly)2(binap)]/Li2CO3: A Highly Active, Robust, and Enantioselective Catalyst for the Cyanosilylation of Aldehydes (pages 6643–6646)

      Nobuhito Kurono, Kenta Arai, Masato Uemura and Takeshi Ohkuma

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801501

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      The right combination: A series of aromatic, heteroaromatic, aliphatic, and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes can be converted into the desired silylated cyanohydrins by reaction with (CH3)3SiCN and a catalyst system consisting of the combination of a chiral ruthenium complex and Li2CO3 (see scheme). The reaction is highly enantioselective and affords the R products with up to 98 % ee within 24 h at a substrate-to-catalyst ratio of 10 000:1.

    19. Multicomponent Reactions

      Catalytic Enantioselective Trapping of an Alcoholic Oxonium Ylide with Aldehydes: RhII/ZrIV-Co-Catalyzed Three-Component Reactions of Aryl Diazoacetates, Benzyl Alcohol, and Aldehydes (pages 6647–6649)

      Xu Zhang, Haoxi Huang, Xin Guo, Xiaoyu Guan, Liping Yang and Wenhao Hu

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801510

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      The right combination: A catalytic asymmetric multicomponent reaction has been developed in which two stereogenic carbon centers are constructed in a single step (see scheme; erythro/threo 90:10, up to 80 % yield, 98 % ee). This type of enantioselective three-component reaction generates α,β-dihydroxy acid derivatives in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. Bn=benzyl.

    20. Natural Products

      Rapid Construction of the Cortistatin Pentacyclic Core (pages 6650–6653)

      Eric M. Simmons, Alison R. Hardin, Xuelei Guo and Richmond Sarpong

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802203

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      Ringing in cortistatin: The pentacyclic core of the cortistatin steroidal alkaloids has been readily assembled in eleven steps from simple building blocks (see scheme; PMB=para-methoxybenzyl, TBS=tert-butyldimethylsilyl). An enyne cycloisomerization and an oxidative dearomatization/cyclization are the key ring-forming steps in this sequence.

    21. Contact Electrification

      Patterns of Electrostatic Charge and Discharge in Contact Electrification (pages 6654–6656)

      Samuel W. Thomas III, Sarah J. Vella, George K. Kaufman and George M. Whitesides

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802062

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      Episodic breakdown: The dynamics of contact electrification of a metal sphere rolling across an insulating plate are investigated. The data are consistent with contact charging that involves the transfer of ions (see picture), interrupted by episodic discharge events that involve the dielectric breakdown of air.

    22. Natural Product Synthesis

      The Asymmetric Total Synthesis of (+)-Cytotrienin A, an Ansamycin-Type Anticancer Drug (pages 6657–6660)

      Yujiro Hayashi, Mitsuru Shoji, Hayato Ishikawa, Junichiro Yamaguchi, Tomohiro Tamura, Hiroki Imai, Yosuke Nishigaya, Kenichi Takabe, Hideaki Kakeya and Hiroyuki Osada

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802079

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      A star-studded lineup: (+)-Cytotrienin A was the target of an asymmetric total synthesis featuring an enantioselective aldol reaction, α-aminoxylation, deoxygenation, and a ring-closing metathesis to form the 21-membered macrolactam. This first total synthesis confirms the relative and absolute confguration of the molecule.

    23. Fluorescent Probes

      A Highly Emissive Fluorescent Nucleoside that Signals the Activity of Toxic Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins (pages 6661–6665)

      Seergazhi G. Srivatsan, Nicholas J. Greco and Yitzhak Tor

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802199

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      Lethal weapon: The presence of RNA abasic sites generated by ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) such as ricin can be detected. RNA depurination by toxins is signaled by the enhanced emission intensity of synthetically modified emissive RNA constructs that are complementary to the α-sarcin/ricin loop (see picture). This method is more efficient and precise than the use of radiolabeled substrates.

    24. Gold Nanoparticles

      An Organometallic Approach to Gold Nanoparticles: Synthesis and X-Ray Structure of CO-Protected Au21Fe10, Au22Fe12, Au28Fe14, and Au34Fe14 Clusters (pages 6666–6669)

      Cristina Femoni, Maria Carmela Iapalucci, Giuliano Longoni, Cristina Tiozzo and Stefano Zacchini

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802267

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      CO-vering gold: An organometallic approach to the synthesis of CO-protected Au–Fe nanoparticles led to solutions of colloids with hydrodynamic diameters between 4 and 300 nm, from which [Au21{Fe(CO)4}10]5− (picture: metal frame; Au yellow, Fe green), [Au22{Fe(CO)4}12]6−, [Au28{Fe(CO)3}4{Fe(CO)4}10]8−, and [Au34{Fe(CO)3}6{Fe(CO)4}8]8− were isolated. Their X-ray structures resemble those of gold–thiolate clusters.

    25. Mesostructures

      Solving Complex Concentric Circular Mesostructures by Using Electron Tomography (pages 6670–6673)

      Pei Yuan, Nian Liu, Lingzhi Zhao, Xufeng Zhou, Liang Zhou, Graeme J. Auchterlonie, Xiangdong Yao, John Drennan, Gao Qing (Max) Lu, Jin Zou and Chengzhong Yu

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801755

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      Inside knowledge: The true internal structure of a complex concentric circular hexagonal mesostructure has been solved for the first time by using electron tomography. This technique allows the mesostructure containing closed rings to be differentiated from a closed helical mesostructure. The key step is the use of tomographic slices with a thickness of less than 1 nm so that the interior structure can be observed (see picture).

    26. Solid-Phase Synthesis

      Solid-Phase Organic Synthesis in the Presence of Compressed Carbon Dioxide (pages 6674–6677)

      Annika Stobrawe, Piotr Makarczyk, Céline Maillet, Jean-Luc Muller and Walter Leitner

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801653

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      Under pressure: The mass-transfer limitation in solid-phase organic synthesis with pressurized gaseous reagents is overcome by using carbon dioxide in the homogeneous supercritical state (right) for hydroformylation or under expanded-liquid conditions (left) for Pauson–Khand reactions. The use of standard high-pressure vessels and commercially available receptacles for the compartmentalization of substrates enables straightforward parallelization.

    27. Peptide Arrays

      Helical Peptide Arrays on Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces through Soft and Reactive Landing of Mass-Selected Ions (pages 6678–6680)

      Peng Wang and Julia Laskin

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801366

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      Gently does it: Soft landing (SL) of mass-selected peptide ions can be used for preparation of conformation-specific peptide arrays on self-assembled monolayer surfaces. Deposition from solution results in formation of a peptide layer dominated by the β-sheet structure, whereas with SL, a stable α-helical peptide layer on SAM surfaces is formed.

    28. DNA Analysis

      Nanohybrid Carbon Film for Electrochemical Detection of SNPs without Hybridization or Labeling (pages 6681–6684)

      Dai Kato, Naoyuki Sekioka, Akio Ueda, Ryoji Kurita, Shigeru Hirono, Koji Suzuki and Osamu Niwa

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801304

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      Base discrimination: A nanocarbon film electrode exhibits sufficiently high activity to obtain sharp, quantitative peaks for all the bases in an oligonucleotide. This property allows the label-free electrochemical analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) through the discrimination of single-base differences solely by using electrochemical oxidation (see picture; ssDNA=single-strand DNA).

    29. Surface Chemistry

      Dissociation of SO2 on Au/TiC(001): Effects of Au–C Interactions and Charge Polarization (pages 6685–6689)

      José A. Rodriguez, Ping Liu, Francesc Viñes, Francesc Illas, Yoshiro Takahashi and Kenichi Nakamura

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Activating gold: High-resolution photoemission spectroscopy and DFT calculations were used to study the interaction of SO2 with Au/TiC(001) surfaces. Both revealed molecular adsorption of SO2 on TiC(001) but complete dissociation of the S[BOND]O bonds on Au/TiC(001) (see picture). Au/TiC(001) cleaves S[BOND]O bonds more efficiently than Au/TiO2(110) or Au/MgO(100) and decomposes SO2 at temperatures as low as 150 K.

    30. Polymer Gels

      Peristaltic Motion of Polymer Gels (pages 6690–6693)

      Shingo Maeda, Yusuke Hara, Ryo Yoshida and Shuji Hashimoto

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801347

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      It's alive! A polymer gel has been developed that can generate a peristaltic motion without external stimuli. The motion is produced by dissipating the chemical energy of an oscillating reaction that occurs inside the gel. Although the gel is solely composed of a synthetic polymer, it shows independent motion as if it were alive. The motion of the gel can be harnessed to transport objects with millimeter dimensions (see picture).

    31. Cluster Compounds

      Covalently Linked Dimers of Clusters: Loop- and Dumbbell-Shaped Mn24 and Mn26 Single-Molecule Magnets (pages 6694–6698)

      Theocharis C. Stamatatos, Khalil A. Abboud, Wolfgang Wernsdorfer and George Christou

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801393

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      Double impact: The use of both azide and di-2-pyridylketone-derived ligands has provided new Mn24 (left) and Mn26 complexes (right) with loop and dumbbell structures that are made up of two covalently linked Mn12 and Mn13 units, respectively. Both complexes are single-molecule magnets, and the Mn26 complex displays the largest barrier for magnetization reversal in a MnII/III complex known to date. MnII yellow, MnIII blue, O red, N green, C gray.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Covalently Linked Dimers of Clusters: Loop- and Dumbbell-Shaped Mn24 and Mn26 Single-Molecule Magnets

      Vol. 47, Issue 50, 9590, Article first published online: 26 NOV 2008

    32. Electron Transfer

      Observation of Electrochemical Single-Electron-Transfer Events of Gold Nanoparticles in Aqueous Solution in the Presence of Both Ammonium and Sulfonate Surface-Active Agents (pages 6699–6702)

      Misaki Nakai, Yoshinori Yamanoi, Yoshihiko Nishimori, Tetsu Yonezawa and Hiroshi Nishihara

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801704

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      The synergistic effect of the two surfactants hexyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate allows the redox peaks of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) to be observed in the differential pulse voltammogram of an AuNP-modified Au electrode in aqueous solution (b), whereas in the presence of Et4NClO4 alone no significant peaks ascribable to AuNP redox processes appear due to the high dielectric constant of water (a).

    33. Electronic Structure

      Calcium d States: Chemical Bonding of CaC6 (pages 6703–6706)

      Shuiquan Deng, Arndt Simon and Jürgen Köhler

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801985

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Ca 3d state is a necessary and sufficient condition to produce an interlayer band in CaC6 according to model and first-principles studies, and this band cannot be considered to be a free-electron band. Involvement of the Ca 3d state in the chemical bonding and its tight-binding character explain the unusual Ca isotope effect in CaC6. The picture shows the orbital topology of one of the Fermi states of CaC6.

    34. Asymmetric Epoxidation

      Functional Analysis of an Aspartate-Based Epoxidation Catalyst with Amide-to-Alkene Peptidomimetic Catalyst Analogues (pages 6707–6711)

      Charles E. Jakobsche, Gorka Peris and Scott J. Miller

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802223

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      Subtle exchange: Replacement of an amide function with alkene or fluoroalkene groups provides a new class of epoxidation catalysts (see scheme). The structure-dependent catalytic behavior of these isosteric peptides provides mechanistic insights in their mode of action.

    35. Supramolecular Chemistry

      A Discrete Supramolecular Conglomerate Composed of Two Saddle-Distorted Zinc(II)-Phthalocyanine Complexes and a Doubly Protonated Porphyrin with Saddle Distortion Undergoing Efficient Photoinduced Electron Transfer (pages 6712–6716)

      Takahiko Kojima, Tatsuhiko Honda, Kei Ohkubo, Motoo Shiro, Takahiro Kusukawa, Takamitsu Fukuda, Nagao Kobayashi and Shunichi Fukuzumi

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802601

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Blazing saddles: A supramolecular conglomerate is formed by intermolecular hydrogen bonding between two saddle-distorted ZnII–phthalocyanine complexes coordinated by 4-pyridinecarboxylate and one doubly protonated saddle-distorted porphyrin dication. The assembly undergoes photoinduced intrasupramolecular electron transfer to generate an electron-transfer state with the lifetime of 667 ps.

    36. Fullerenes

      Site-Selective Fabrication of Two-Dimensional Fullerene Arrays by Using a Supramolecular Template at the Liquid-Solid Interface (pages 6717–6721)

      Min Li, Ke Deng, Sheng-Bin Lei, Yan-Lian Yang, Tai-Shan Wang, Yong-Tao Shen, Chun-Ru Wang, Qing-Dao Zeng and Chen Wang

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802518

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A selective invitation: A 2D hydrogen-bonded porous network formed by an azobenzene derivative (NN4 A) contains two different types of cavities and is shown to selectively accommodate fullerenes C80 and Sc3N§C80 (see picture). Highly ordered fullerene arrays are constructed at the liquid–solid interface of graphite by coadsorption of fullerenes and NN4 A. While C60 occupies both types of cavity, C80 and Sc3N§C80 are only immobilized in one cavity type.

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      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890174

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