Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Angewandte Chemie International Edition

September 29, 2008

Volume 47, Issue 41

Pages 7773–7965

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Toward Functional Clathrasils: Size- and Composition-Controlled Octadecasil Nanocrystals by Desilication (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 41/2008) (page 7773)

      Javier Pérez-Ramírez, Sònia Abelló, Luis A. Villaescusa and Adriana Bonilla

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890201

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Like sucking and chewing sweets the action of sodium hydroxide leads to clathrasil nanocrystals by selective silicon dissolution. In the Communication on page 7913 ff., Pérez-Ramírez et al. show that the size, porosity, and composition of octadecasil crystals can be tuned by adjusting the alkaline conditions. This top-down approach could lead to functional clathrasils, opening a new window for research on this type of materials both in terms of post-synthesis modification and application in catalysis.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Gold(I)-Catalyzed Alkoxyhalogenation of β-Hydroxy-α,α-Difluoroynones (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 41/2008) (page 7774)

      Marie Schuler, Franck Silva, Carla Bobbio, Arnaud Tessier and Véronique Gouverneur

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890202

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold(I) catalysts teamed with selectfluor produce trifluorinated dihydropyranones from difluoroynones under mild conditions, as described by V. Gouverneur et al. in the Communication on page 7927 ff. The process proceeds via a vinylgold intermediate that undergoes fluorination and competing protonation. This gold chemistry is encouraging for the synthesis of architecturally complex fluorinated targets combining fluorinated precursors with electrophilic fluorinating reagents. The illustration was produced by Dr. Karl Harrison (University of Oxford)

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  4. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      N-Terminal Protein Modification through a Biomimetic Transamination Reaction (page 7788)

      Joshua M. Gilmore, Rebecca A. Scheck, Aaron P. Esser-Kahn, Neel S. Joshi and Matthew B. Francis

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890204

      This article corrects:

      N-Terminal Protein Modification through a Biomimetic Transamination Reaction1

      Vol. 45, Issue 32, 5307–5311, Article first published online: 17 JUL 2006

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  6. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Nanoparticles and Catalysis. Edited by Didier Astruc. (page 7795)

      Michael S. Wong

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200785570

  7. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Silver Acetylene Complexes (1)

      Comments on “Homoleptical Silver(I) Acetylene Complexes” (pages 7796–7797)

      Andreas Krapp and Gernot Frenking

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200705423

      In a recent publication, Krossing, Scherer, and co-workers reported interesting experimental results for homoleptic AgI acetylene complexes. In this Correspondence the interpretation of the X-ray analysis and the claim of “pseudo-gas-phase conditions” in the solid state are questioned.

    2. Silver Acetylene Complexes (2)

      Reply (pages 7798–7801)

      Daniel Himmel, Nils Trapp, Ingo Krossing, Sandra Altmannshofer, Verena Herz, Georg Eickerling and Wolfgang Scherer

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802616

      The comments of Krapp and Frenking are acknowledged, however, it is proposed that a detailed description of the nature of the metal–ligand bonding in the AgI acetylene complexes has to consider orbital interactions, in contrast to the electrostatic picture drawn by Krapp and Frenking.

  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Directed Evolution

      Artificial Enzymes Made to Order: Combination of Computational Design and Directed Evolution (pages 7802–7803)

      Thomas R. Ward

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802865

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Intelligent design: The combination of computational design and directed evolution has allowed the creation and optimization of an artificial enzyme starting from a catalytically inactive protein scaffold. In this approach, glutamate, tryptophane, and lysine residues were introduced into a TIM barrel fold to yield an artificial enzyme for the Kemp elimination that was fine-tuned by directed evolution (kcat/Km=2590 M−1 s−1, see picture).

    2. Functional Materials

      Self-Immolative Polymers (pages 7804–7806)

      Wenxin Wang and Cameron Alexander

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802474

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This message will self-destruct! Polymers that can be triggered to disassemble in a sequential fashion following a single triggering event were described recently. The amplification effect after cleavage of an end group by an enzyme leads to the spontaneous fragmentation of the polymer and the release of fluorescent reporters. The significance of these systems in terms of enzyme detection and drug release is discussed.

  9. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Touch Sensors

      Tactile Devices To Sense Touch on a Par with a Human Finger (pages 7808–7826)

      Vivek Maheshwari and Ravi Saraf

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200703693

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electronic skin: Emulating the tactile sense of human touch will have a great impact on robotics. A new flexible thin film composed of nanoparticles and polyelectrolyte can feel texture on a par with a human finger. The picture shows how the pressing of a coin on such a sensor leads to a specific voltage distibution. Current research in nanomaterials and molecular electronics is described.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Direct-Gap Semiconductors

      Soluble Direct-Band-Gap Semiconductors LiAsS2 and NaAsS2: Large Electronic Structure Effects from Weak As⋅⋅⋅S Interactions and Strong Nonlinear Optical Response (pages 7828–7832)

      Tarun K. Bera, Jung-Hwan Song, Arthur J. Freeman, Joon I. Jang, John B. Ketterson and Mercouri G. Kanatzidis

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801392

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bridging the gap: Li1−xNaxAsS2 (x=0–1) species are found to be a new class of polar direct-gap semiconductors, which display a strong second harmonic generator (SHG) response. The anomalous band-gap trend and their direct-band-gap nature was studied by calculations. The 1.6 eV direct energy gap of LiAsS2 coupled with its high solubility makes it promising as an efficient light harvesting component in solar cells.

    2. Microreactors

      Aryllithium Compounds Bearing Alkoxycarbonyl Groups: Generation and Reactions Using a Microflow System (pages 7833–7836)

      Aiichiro Nagaki, Heejin Kim and Jun-ichi Yoshida

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803205

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Go with the flow: An effective method for the generation and reaction of aryllithium compounds bearing an alkoxycarbonyl group is developed using microflow systems with very short residence times together with fast mixing and efficient temperature control. A wide range of alkoxycarbonyl groups including ethoxycarbonyl and methoxycarbonyl groups are tolerant of the microflow conditions.

    3. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of Callystatin A by Titanium-Mediated Reductive Alkyne–Alkyne Cross-Coupling (pages 7837–7840)

      Holly A. Reichard, Jude C. Rieger and Glenn C. Micalizio

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using a modular approach: A concise synthesis of callystatin A has been developed. The modular pathway provides access to the highly unsaturated skeleton of the leptomycin natural products by using a complex titanium-mediated reductive alkyne–alkyne cross-coupling reaction as the key transformation (see scheme; TBS=tert-butyldimethylsilyl).

    4. Fuel Cells

      A Proton-Conducting Fuel Cell Operating with Hydrocarbon Fuels (pages 7841–7844)

      Pilwon Heo, Kenichi Ito, Atsuko Tomita and Takashi Hibino

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801667

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Low temperature, high voltage! Direct oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels, including methane, ethane, propane, and butane, occurs over Pt-free anodes in a proton-conducting fuel cell in the temperature range 100–300 °C. A Mo2C–ZrO2/C anode (30 mg Mo2C–ZrO2 per cm2) yields power densities equal to those obtained from Pt/C anodes (1–7 mg Pt per cm2) and generates higher open-circuit voltages than the Pt/C anodes.

    5. Biomimetic Synthesis

      Monitoring Biomimetic Platinum Nanocluster Formation Using Mass Spectrometry and Cluster-Dependent H2 Production (pages 7845–7848)

      Sebyung Kang, Janice Lucon, Zachary B. Varpness, Lars Liepold, Masaki Uchida, Debbie Willits, Mark Young and Trevor Douglas

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802481

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Matter of size: Platinum nanocluster formation inside protein cages (LiDps protein) was monitored by noncovalent mass spectrometry. The Pt clusters catalyze hydrogen formation in presence of an iridium photosensitizer (PS; see scheme, TEOA=triethanolamine), and their catalytic activity depends on the cluster size.

    6. Hydroxylation

      Facile Oxy-Functionalization of a Nucleophilic Metal Alkyl with a cis-Dioxo Metal Species via a (2+3) Transition State (pages 7849–7852)

      Brian L. Conley, Somesh K. Ganesh, Jason M. Gonzales, Daniel H. Ess, Robert J. Nielsen, Vadim R. Ziatdinov, Jonas Oxgaard, William A. Goddard III and Roy A. Periana

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802575

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An easy transition: Facile generation of methanol is achieved by hydroxide-promoted transfer of a nucleophilic methyl group from methyltrioxorhenium to osmium tetroxide in basic aqueous medium via a cyclic transition state. 1H NMR spectroscopy and density functional calculations are used to investigate reaction pathways.

    7. Blue Protein

      Unusual Chromophore and Cross-Links in Ranasmurfin: A Blue Protein from the Foam Nests of a Tropical Frog (pages 7853–7856)

      Muse Oke, Rosalind Tan Yan Ching, Lester G. Carter, Kenneth A. Johnson, Huanting Liu, Stephen A. McMahon, Malcolm F. White, Carlos Bloch Jr., Catherine H. Botting, Martin A. Walsh, Aishah A. Latiff, Malcolm W. Kennedy, Alan Cooper and James H. Naismith

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802901

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A smurfin' good structure: The 1.16 Å resolution crystal structure of ranasmurfin, a blue protein extracted from the foam nests of the Malaysian tree frog Polypedates leucomystax, reveals unusual posttranslational chemical modifications. The chromophore involves an extended Zn-coordinated four-residue (Lys-Tyr-Tyr-Lys) inter-subunit cross-link of a kind not previously reported.

    8. Protein Interactions

      Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles as a Powerful Systems Biology Characterization Tool in the Physiological Context (pages 7857–7860)

      Jatuporn Salaklang, Benedikt Steitz, Andrija Finka, Conlin P. O'Neil, Marc Moniatte, André J. van der Vlies, Todd D. Giorgio, Heinrich Hofmann, Jeffrey A. Hubbell and Alke Petri-Fink

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800357

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spying on SPIONs: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) bearing a mitochondrial targeting peptide (MTP), a cyclic RGD peptide for internalization (cRGD), and a fluorophore for tracking can be targeted to mitochondria. After magnetic isolation from the cells, 48 proteins are identified by mass spectrometry to be interacting with the MTP-cRGD-SPIONs in a network that consists of 308 interactions (see picture).

    9. Protein Engineering

      An Engineered Protease that Cleaves Specifically after Sulfated Tyrosine (pages 7861–7863)

      Navin Varadarajan, George Georgiou and Brent L. Iverson

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800736

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Picky eater: The bacterial protease OmpT has been engineered to cleave after sulfotyrosine residues in peptide substrates but not after phosphotyrosine (see scheme). A selection/counterselection screen was used to identify OmpT variants with the desired specificity and high levels of overall catalytic activity.

    10. Protein Structures

      Bicelle-Enabled Structural Studies on a Membrane-Associated Cytochrome b5 by Solid-State MAS NMR Spectroscopy (pages 7864–7867)

      Jiadi Xu, Ulrich H. N. Dürr, Sang-Choul Im, Zhehong Gan, Lucy Waskell and Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801338

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spinning bicelles: Solving 3D structures of membrane proteins is a great challenge because of the difficulty in finding well-behaved model membranes. Bicelles are well suited to overcome these difficulties and enable the use of solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy experiments for studies on a large soluble domain containing a low concentration of membrane protein cytochrome b5 at 37 °C.

    11. Germanates

      A Germanate Built from a 68126 Cavity Cotemplated by an (H2O)16 Cluster and 2-Methylpiperazine (pages 7868–7871)

      Qinhe Pan, Jiyang Li, Kirsten E. Christensen, Charlotte Bonneau, Xiaoyan Ren, Lei Shi, Junliang Sun, Xiaodong Zou, Guanghua Li, Jihong Yu and Ruren Xu

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801375

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Totally tubular: A new tubular germanate is cotemplated by 2-methylpiperazine and an (H2O)16 cluster in a hydro(solvo)thermal synthesis. The germanate features a large, highly symmetric 68126 cavity (see picture; yellow sphere) built from 12 Ge7X19 (X=O, OH, F) clusters (GeX6 red, GeX5 yellow, GeX4 green).

    12. Asymmetric Organocatalysis

      A Highly Reactive and Enantioselective Bifunctional Organocatalyst for the Methanolytic Desymmetrization of Cyclic Anhydrides: Prevention of Catalyst Aggregation (pages 7872–7875)

      Sang Ho Oh, Ho Sik Rho, Ji Woong Lee, Je Eun Lee, Sung Hoon Youk, Jik Chin and Choong Eui Song

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801636

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Unprecedented reactivity and high stereoselectivity were observed in the ring opening of meso anhydrides under mild conditions with a cinchona-alkaloid-based sulfonamide catalyst (see scheme). Computation of the catalyst–transition-state analogue (right; gray C, white H, green F, blue N, red O, yellow S) provided insight into the origin of the stereoselectivity.

    13. Biotemplates for Nanotechnology

      Fungal Templates for Noble-Metal Nanoparticles and Their Application in Catalysis (pages 7876–7879)

      Nadja C. Bigall, Manuela Reitzig, Wolfgang Naumann, Paul Simon, Karl-Heinz van Pée and Alexander Eychmüller

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801802

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Living templates: Gold, silver, platinum, and palladium nanoparticles are synthesized. The as-obtained citrate-stabilized solutions are used as growth media for a variety of fungi. The nanoparticles partly assemble onto the mycelia, leading to a hybrid structure which consists of a biological template covered with nanoparticles. Supercritical drying of these structures conserves the three-dimensional tubular shape.

    14. Drug Delivery

      Sustained Release of Drugs Dispersed in Polymer Nanoparticles (pages 7880–7882)

      Gunilla B. Jacobson, Rajesh Shinde, Christopher H. Contag and Richard N. Zare

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802260

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Please release me: Supercritical carbon dioxide was used as an antisolvent for the formation of nanoparticles that contain luciferin, a bioactive therapeutic, dispersed in poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a biodegradable polymer. These nanoparticles undergo slow and sustained drug release, which can be monitored by bioluminescence both in vitro and in vivo (see picture; ATP=adenosine triphosphate; ADP=adenosine diphosphate; Pi=inorganic phosphate).

    15. Molecular Probes

      A Near-Infrared Squaraine Dye as a Latent Ratiometric Fluorophore for the Detection of Aminothiol Content in Blood Plasma (pages 7883–7887)

      Sivaramapanicker Sreejith, Kizhumuri P. Divya and Ayyappanpillai Ajayaghosh

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803194

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hunt for thiols: A nucleophilic thiol attack on a weakly fluorescent near-infrared (NIR) squaraine dye results in a conjugation break to form an adduct that absorbs in the UV/Vis region and is highly fluorescent. This fluorophore allows the selective detection of thiols either by colorimetry or fluorescence (see picture). The probe is suitable for the detection and estimation of the total aminothiol content in human blood plasma.

    16. Radical Reactions

      Oxygenation of a Me2Zn/α-Diimine System: A Unique Zinc Methylperoxide Cluster and Evidence for Its Sequential Decomposition Pathways (pages 7888–7891)

      Janusz Lewiński, Karolina Suwała, Marcin Kubisiak, Zbigniew Ochal, Iwona Justyniak and Janusz Lipkowski

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803254

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      O what a reaction: The oxygenation of Me2Zn⋅tBu-DAB (tBu-DAB=1,4-di-tert-butyl-1,4-diazabutadiene) affords the unprecedented oxo(methylperoxide) cubane 1, the corresponding double cubic oxo(methoxide) 2, and the C[BOND]C coupled dinuclear methoxide [(MeZn)2(tBu-DAB-DAB(H)-tBu)(μ-OMe)], the formation of which involves initial ZnO[BOND]OMe bond homolysis.

    17. Cycloisomerization Reactions

      cis-Selective Single-Cleavage Skeletal Rearrangement of 1,6-Enynes Reveals the Multifaceted Character of the Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Cycloisomerizations (pages 7892–7895)

      Eloísa Jiménez-Núñez, Christelle K. Claverie, Christophe Bour, Diego J. Cárdenas and Antonio M. Echavarren

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803269

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A skeleton in the closet: The unprecedented title rearrangement of 1,6-enynes has been observed with gold and platinum catalysts (see scheme, [M]=metal catalyst, Z=C(CO2Me)2, R=electron-donating group). This reaction is proposed to proceed through an open carbocationic species.

    18. Catalytic Antioxidants

      Amphiphilic/Bipolar Metallocorroles That Catalyze the Decomposition of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, Rescue Lipoproteins from Oxidative Damage, and Attenuate Atherosclerosis in Mice (pages 7896–7900)

      Adi Haber, Atif Mahammed, Bianca Fuhrman, Nina Volkova, Raymond Coleman, Tony Hayek, Michael Aviram and Zeev Gross

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801149

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antioxidants that work! The iron corrole 1-Fe (see picture) is a potent catalyst for decomposition of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that binds selectively to lipoproteins. The complex also affects cholesterol levels and its cellular efflux. 1-Fe is more effective than natural antioxidants in reducing atherosclerosis development in mice. LDL=low-density lipoprotein.

    19. Donor–Acceptor Block Copolymers

      Crystalline–Crystalline Donor–Acceptor Block Copolymers (pages 7901–7904)

      Michael Sommer, Andreas S. Lang and Mukundan Thelakkat

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802725

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Efficient combination of two polymerization reactions allowed various complex issues in photovoltaic devices, such as light absorption, the presence of a donor–acceptor heterojunction, photoluminescence quenching, crystallinity, and microphase separation, to all be addressed in a single block copolymer (see picture).

    20. Endohedral Fullerenes

      Observation of 13C NMR Chemical Shifts of Metal Carbides Encapsulated in Fullerenes: Sc2C2@C82, Sc2C2@C84, and Sc3C2@C80 (pages 7905–7908)

      Yuko Yamazaki, Koji Nakajima, Takatsugu Wakahara, Tsuchiya Tsuchiya, Midori O. Ishitsuka, Yutaka Maeda, Takeshi Akasaka, Markus Waelchli, Naomi Mizorogi and Shigeru Nagase

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802584

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Seeing the filling in fullerenes: The 13C NMR chemical shifts of the C2 units in Sc2C2@C82(C3v), Sc2C2@C84(D2d), [Sc3C2@C80(Ih)] (see picture), adamantylidene adduct of Sc3C2@C80(Ih) were observed for the first time and agree well with the calculated values. The 13C NMR chemical shifts of all cage carbon atoms in these fullerenes were assigned by 2D INADEQUATE NMR measurements.

    21. Emission Spectrometry

      Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric-Barrier Discharge as a Radiation Source for Optical Emission Spectrometry (pages 7909–7912)

      Yongliang Yu, Zhuo Du, Mingli Chen and Jianhua Wang

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802681

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Honey, I shrunk the spectrometer: The use of atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) as a radiation source for atomic optical emission spectrometry (OES) allowed the construction of a miniaturized DBD–OES system. A microsequential injection configuration (the picture shows the DBD unit and its cross-sectional configuration, HV=discharge power) provides favorable analytical performance for the system, as demonstrated for the determination of mercury.

    22. Clathrates

      Toward Functional Clathrasils: Size- and Composition-Controlled Octadecasil Nanocrystals by Desilication (pages 7913–7917)

      Javier Pérez-Ramírez, Sònia Abelló, Luis A. Villaescusa and Adriana Bonilla

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802393

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Clathrasils go functional: Nanosized octadecasil crystals with tunable size and variable Si/Al ratio have been synthesized by controlled desilication of the parent clathrasil in alkaline medium. Extremely small (10–25 nm) nanocrystals with high external surface area (200 m2 g−1) and preserved crystallinity were attained (see picture). This result widens the scope of this class of materials, opening room for catalytic applications.

    23. Prebiotic Chemistry

      Production of Potentially Prebiotic Condensed Phosphates by Phosphorus Redox Chemistry (pages 7918–7920)

      Matthew A. Pasek, Terence P. Kee, David E. Bryant, Alexander A. Pavlov and Jonathan I. Lunine

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802145

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bringing phosphorus to life: The prebiotic origin of key biomolecules such as RNA and ATP is contingent on a source of condensed phosphates, such as pyrophosphate and triphosphate. Condensed phosphates can be produced at high yields from the oxidation of H-phosphonate or H-phosphinate. Reactive phosphates were likely abundant on the early earth's surface, setting the stage for prebiotic chemistry that led to the evolution of life.

    24. 3D Nanostructures

      3D Rutile Titania-Based Structures with Morpho Butterfly Wing Scale Morphologies (pages 7921–7923)

      Michael R. Weatherspoon, Ye Cai, Matija Crne, Mohan Srinivasarao and Kenneth H. Sandhage

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801311

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rutile replicas of butterfly scales: Rutile titania-based structures, retaining the morphology of wing scales of a Morpho butterfly (see pictures), are synthesized using an automated, surface sol–gel process. By doping a titanium alkoxide precursor solution with a tin alkoxide, rutile structures were formed at 450 °C. This method may be used to apply rutile coatings on other organic templates for biomedical, filtration, or optical applications.

    25. Biofuels

      Direct, High-Yield Conversion of Cellulose into Biofuel (pages 7924–7926)

      Mark Mascal and Edward B. Nikitin

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801594

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fueling up with furans: Cellulose can be converted into furanic biofuels in unprecedented yields using an inexpensive, simple process involving concurrent hydrolysis, dehydration, and chlorine substitution reactions coupled with continuous extraction into an organic phase (see scheme). Furanic ethers, such as those that can be derived from the products above, are known diesel additives.

    26. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Gold(I)-Catalyzed Alkoxyhalogenation of β-Hydroxy-α,α-Difluoroynones (pages 7927–7930)

      Marie Schuler, Franck Silva, Carla Bobbio, Arnaud Tessier and Véronique Gouverneur

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802162

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold standard: AuCl was found to be the only suitable catalyst for the 6-endo-dig ring closure of hydroxylated difluorinated ynones (see scheme), a class of substrates that displays low reactivity owing to the presence of the gem-difluoro group. For the first time, a gold catalyst is used in combination with an electrophilic fluorinating reagent.

    27. Photocatalysts

      Ag@AgCl: A Highly Efficient and Stable Photocatalyst Active under Visible Light (pages 7931–7933)

      Peng Wang, Baibiao Huang, Xiaoyan Qin, Xiaoyang Zhang, Ying Dai, Jiyong Wei and Myung-Hwan Whangbo

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802483

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plasmonic photocatalyst Ag@AgCl, in which Ag nanoparticles are deposited on the surfaces of AgCl particles (SEM image depicted), was prepared by treating Ag2MoO4 with HCl to form AgCl powder and then reducing some Ag+ ions in the surface region of the AgCl particles to Ag0. This photocatalyst is highly efficient, for example in the degradation of organic dyes, and stable under visible light.

    28. Intercalation

      Lattice Widening in Niobium-Doped TiO2 Nanotubes: Efficient Ion Intercalation and Swift Electrochromic Contrast (pages 7934–7937)

      Andrei Ghicov, Masahiro Yamamoto and Patrik Schmuki

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802598

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Widely accommodating: Novel TiO2/Nb nanotube layers (see picture, right) are grown on a titanium–niobium alloy. Niobium doping of TiO2 enlarges the cell parameters of the anatase lattice (left; Nb green, Ti gray, O red), facilitating the intercalation of H+ and Li+ ions, and even larger Na+ ions (blue) into the lattice.

    29. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Supported Silver-Nanoparticle-Catalyzed Highly Efficient Aqueous Oxidation of Phenylsilanes to Silanols (pages 7938–7940)

      Takato Mitsudome, Shusuke Arita, Haruhiko Mori, Tomoo Mizugaki, Koichiro Jitsukawa and Kiyotomi Kaneda

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802761

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bon Apatite! Hydroxyapatite-supported silver nanoparticles act as a highly efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the oxidation of diverse phenylsilanes into silanols in water (see picture; C orange, H red, O blue, R purple, Si green), while suppressing significant condensation to the disiloxanes. The solid silver catalyst is readily reusable without any loss of activity or selectivity.

    30. Asymmetric Synthesis

      Anionic–Anionic Asymmetric Tandem Reactions: One-Pot Synthesis of Optically Pure Fluorinated Indolines from 2-p-Tolylsulfinyl Alkylbenzenes (pages 7941–7944)

      José Luis García Ruano, José Alemán, Silvia Catalán, Vanesa Marcos, Silvia Monteagudo, Alejandro Parra, Carlos del Pozo and Santos Fustero

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802885

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chirality switch up: A novel strategy has been developed to give optically pure fluorinated indolines with one or two stereogenic centers (see scheme; AN=nucleophilic addition, PG=protecting group, SNAr=intramolecular nucleophilic aromatic substitution, Tol=tolyl). Almost complete stereoselectivity and mild reaction conditions are the key features of the title reaction.

    31. Natural Products

      Total Synthesis of (−)-Allosecurinine (pages 7945–7948)

      Andrew B. Leduc and Michael A. Kerr

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803257

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Safe and secure: An efficient methodology which provides access to homochiral 2,5-cis pyrrolidines in excellent yields starting from chiral alkoxyamine cyclopropanes was used in the total synthesis of (−)-allosecurinine (see scheme). The synthesis proceeds with enantiomeric purity in 15 steps with an overall yield of 5 %. OTf: trifluoromethanesulfonate, Boc: tert-butoxycarbonyl, PG: protecting group.

    32. Superconductivity

      Superconductivity and Crystal Structures of (Ba1−xKx)Fe2As2 (x=0–1) (pages 7949–7952)

      Marianne Rotter, Michael Pangerl, Marcus Tegel and Dirk Johrendt

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803641

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Doping improves performance: Iron arsenides (Ba1−xKx)Fe2As2 with the ThCr2Si2-type structure exhibit superconductivity at 3–38 K depending on the potassium doping level. Superconductivity occurs before the structural distortion of the parent compound BaFe2As2 (x=0) is completely suppressed by doping (see phase diagram; • critical temperature, ○ phase-transition temperature). Doping decreases the bond angles in the iron arsenide layers, suggesting a strong coupling of structural and electronic degrees of freedom.

    33. Biomimetic O2 Activation

      A Trispyrazolylborato Iron Malonato Complex as a Functional Model for the Acetylacetone Dioxygenase (pages 7953–7956)

      Inke Siewert and Christian Limberg

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802955

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Position available: A pentacoordinate iron(II) complex that binds and activates dioxygen shows dioxygenase activity and cleaves diethyl phenylmalonate, in analogy to acetylacetone dioxygenase (see scheme). The mechanism for the model compound allows interesting hypotheses to be made about the enzyme function.

    34. Photochemical Synthesis

      A Polymer-Bound Chiral Template for Enantioselective Photochemical Reactions (pages 7957–7959)

      Stefan Breitenlechner and Thorsten Bach

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802479

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A happy couple: A chiral complexing agent was modified with an ω-hydroxyalkyl linker and immobilized on a Wang resin and on a methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG 2000). The immobilized templates 1 served in an enantioselective photochemical reaction with impressive selectivity (e.r. 92:8 to 96:4) and stability over several cycles.

  11. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Correspondence
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 42/2008 (page 7965)

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890206

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION